×
INTELLIGENT WORK FORUMS
FOR ENGINEERING PROFESSIONALS

Log In

Come Join Us!

Are you an
Engineering professional?
Join Eng-Tips Forums!
  • Talk With Other Members
  • Be Notified Of Responses
    To Your Posts
  • Keyword Search
  • One-Click Access To Your
    Favorite Forums
  • Automated Signatures
    On Your Posts
  • Best Of All, It's Free!
  • Students Click Here

*Eng-Tips's functionality depends on members receiving e-mail. By joining you are opting in to receive e-mail.

Posting Guidelines

Promoting, selling, recruiting, coursework and thesis posting is forbidden.

Students Click Here

FEM MESHING OF PLATE

FEM MESHING OF PLATE

FEM MESHING OF PLATE

(OP)
Hi

I have a plate element, which is meshed as shown in the picture given below. Is that a right way of meshing. If not can anybody give a good reason.
If I am having a slab of 7 meter x 12 meter x 650mm thick and going to analyze as a plate element, what is the size of mesh I have to use. Please explain about aspect ratio of plate mesh in detail.

RE: FEM MESHING OF PLATE

is that the complete mesh ? so the corners of the elements (the rectangles) don't align ? is so the mesh should fail (because it is not continuous).

it is not clear what your structure is, nor why you've chosen to idealise it the way you have.

another day in paradise, or is paradise one day closer ?

RE: FEM MESHING OF PLATE

(OP)
I just shown an example, I just want to know weather the plates must me connected only to the nodes, why not as shown in the above sketch.

RE: FEM MESHING OF PLATE

Hi
I don't understand your figure. Does your complete mesh consist of six elements?

The elements need to be connected at the nodes. This approach may be software specific but I don't think the mesh will work.

Thomas

RE: FEM MESHING OF PLATE

ok, your example is very poor; particularly when you say "I have a plate element, which is meshed as shown".

1) it lacks continuity
2) the mesh is very coarse
3) we don't know where the loads are, where the constraints are, where the limitations of the structure are, where things are that'd affect the mesh, ...

it would be more useful to post the structure you're trying to model and say "how'd i do this?".

expect a bunch of replies like "go back to school and learn FEA" or "hire a component SE".

another day in paradise, or is paradise one day closer ?

RE: FEM MESHING OF PLATE

Why don't you just create the mesh as you have sketched it, and see what happens?

And then generate another mesh where all of the elements join at common corner nodes.

This would be a useful self-education exercise for you to undertake over the holiday period, and then check back in here in the New Year if you have any further questions.

Happy Holidays everybody!

http://julianh72.blogspot.com

RE: FEM MESHING OF PLATE

Quoting:

> I just shown an example, I just want to know weather the plates must me connected only to the nodes, why not as shown in the above sketch.

Your sketch shows no connectivity b/w the elements, meaning that you will have a severed load-path or no load-path at all.

Also learn how to spell /whether/.

RE: FEM MESHING OF PLATE

what u are showing in the picture is not consistent with your description of the slab. it is one slab or six slabs. are they individual slabs or they are bonded together which acts as one piece. and the dimensions that u are describing doesn't not match the dimensions in your picture.

disclaimer: all calculations and comments must be checked by senior engineers before they are taken to be good.

RE: FEM MESHING OF PLATE

I'm going to take a wild guess here, and assume that:

1. You want to analyse an RC floor system supported by beams (probably modelled with plate elements, with line supports representing the beams.
2. You're worried that it won't mesh properly. I.e. each of the rectangles will have their own "mesh" pattern, with "nodes" that don't link up between adjacent panels.

As others have said, you need to be sure in what you want to analyse. Are they one single monolithic slab, or individual slabs? This is going to be extremely software specific, but any decent package will ensure this is something you don't need to worry about for something simple like this ; although the mesh will look terrible, with a very poor aspect ratio).

Yes, the nodes need to connect; the "mesh" is the structure/model, the geometry on which is based isn't considered in the analysis at all. I think understanding the difference between "geometry" and "mesh" in FEA-land will be helpful, going through the manual will be a helpful thing for you to do. Fundamentally, FE is the subdivision of a very large structure into very small pieces (or "elements", connected at individual points (or "nodes"). (please don't burn me at the stake if this statement isnt 100% correct ;), yes I know you can have additional nodes in between etc). If these pieces are not connected, they will act independently.

Hope this helps (also I have some sympathy, as resident FE-guy I have a lot of experience dealing with grads fresh out of uni/college who at best, go through the worked examples, at worst not even that in terms of experience). gl!







Red Flag This Post

Please let us know here why this post is inappropriate. Reasons such as off-topic, duplicates, flames, illegal, vulgar, or students posting their homework.

Red Flag Submitted

Thank you for helping keep Eng-Tips Forums free from inappropriate posts.
The Eng-Tips staff will check this out and take appropriate action.

Reply To This Thread

Posting in the Eng-Tips forums is a member-only feature.

Click Here to join Eng-Tips and talk with other members! Already a Member? Login


Resources

White Paper - How ESI is Helping Move New Medical Device Product to Market Quicker & More Cost Effic
Early Supplier Involvement has long been a strategy employed by manufacturers to produce innovative products. Now, it almost seems like a necessity. Because decisions made in the design phase can positively affect product quality and costs, this can help add value to OEM bottom lines. This white paper will discuss many facets of ESI, including why it’s so valuable today, what challenges limit the benefits of ESI, how cost is impacted, and more. Download Now

Close Box

Join Eng-Tips® Today!

Join your peers on the Internet's largest technical engineering professional community.
It's easy to join and it's free.

Here's Why Members Love Eng-Tips Forums:

Register now while it's still free!

Already a member? Close this window and log in.

Join Us             Close