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D2 in an oven with product

D2 in an oven with product

D2 in an oven with product

(OP)
Is there any danger with putting D2 parts in an oven heated to between 500-1000F with medical stainless steel product? I've been told the D2 could outgas chromium but I haven't found anything to confirm that.

RE: D2 in an oven with product

It had better not outgas at those temps.
Besides the SS parts will have Cr also.
I sure hope that your SS parts are being treated at the lower end of that temperature range, unless you are aging PH grades or tempering martensitic alloys.

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P.E. Metallurgy, consulting work welcomed

RE: D2 in an oven with product

(OP)
Thanks EdStainless. I should have said SS and nitinol for that temp range but it doesn't seem like the D2 would pose a problem. With the D2 having already been heated to 1850 for hardening, I would think anything that would happen already did but I just wanted to make sure.

RE: D2 in an oven with product

The only real issue is the cleaning of the D2 prior to tempering.
Since you are likely air cooling this shouldn't be a problem.
We used to temper D2 at 350F as soon as it had cooled enough to handle.
Then we would go back and re-temper to get the properties that we wanted.
https://www.hudsontoolsteel.com/technical-data/ste...

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P.E. Metallurgy, consulting work welcomed

RE: D2 in an oven with product

(OP)
Yeah we use D2 pretty regularly in our punches and dies and typically temper at 400 to get 59/60 Rc. That's why I want to switch to D2 from CPM 10V. The CPM isn't holding the hardness and cutting edge that I think D2 would give us after basically tempering it over and over again in the production oven.

RE: D2 in an oven with product

What temper on the 10V?
Are you sure that the hardness is the issue? 60-61 on 10V is fairly standard.
What microhardness values are you getting?
In my experience 10V has similar toughness to D@ and 4x the wear resistance.
The V in 10V will always give it better wear resistance at the same hardness.
Are these fairly small parts? Have you looked at quenching from 1825F with a double 450F temper?

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P.E. Metallurgy, consulting work welcomed

RE: D2 in an oven with product

(OP)
The CPM blades come in from the vendor at 60/61 but after a couple hundred cycles in and out of the production oven between 500-1000, they measure 43-48 on our rockwell tester.

RE: D2 in an oven with product

If you are using the 10V at up to 1000F you need to quench from 2025-2050F and then temper at 1025F.
The hardness should be about 61-62 and it should never drop (OK, it will drop a little over hundreds of hours).
With a 1025F temper D2 should be about 58, and it will slowly drop over time.
You might consider M4 or T15 for this application.

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P.E. Metallurgy, consulting work welcomed

RE: D2 in an oven with product

(OP)
Good info. Thanks for your help EdStainless

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