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Running only a single stage in a dual stage pump

Running only a single stage in a dual stage pump

Running only a single stage in a dual stage pump

(OP)
Hey there,

I have a dual stage vacuum pump which broke when I accidentally ran it dry since it spewed out all of its oil. I opened it up and found that one of the rotary vanes was broken. I was wondering if it would be okay to run the pump on one stage only and have the other parts without a vane.

The vane that is broken is in at the second stage. I'm just not sure if there will be sufficient pressure buildup to open the reed valves if my understanding of the system is correct anyways. Please correct me as needed and sorry if I said anything that makes no sense. Thanks.

RE: Running only a single stage in a dual stage pump

Some details of the pump maybe useful?

Doesn't sound like a good idea to me but you should get some level of vacuum.

What type of pump?

Remember - More details = better answers
Also: If you get a response it's polite to respond to it.

RE: Running only a single stage in a dual stage pump

(OP)
Yeah, I definitely agree with you.

It's a dual stage rotary vane vacuum pump that runs with oil. Its specs are 1/2 HP and 5 CFM.

RE: Running only a single stage in a dual stage pump

OK, Not much information eh?

So from a quick google it looks to me like you need to remove the second stage or both vanes completely otherwise your remaining vane will block flow from the first one.

SO I guess about half the vacuum level at the same rate of flow, but there may be issues with an unbalanced machine.

Why can't you fix it or just get another one?

Remember - More details = better answers
Also: If you get a response it's polite to respond to it.

RE: Running only a single stage in a dual stage pump

Hi,
Did you check with vendor and/or why don't you repair/purchase a new one?
To me does not make sense, you need to cope with your process parameter. Check with your process engineer.
my 2 cents
Pierre

RE: Running only a single stage in a dual stage pump

(OP)
@LittleInch, I am unable to fix it right now because I need to replace the rotary vane and those aren't readily available where I live.

It would also require purchasing a new spring and machining the carbon graphite piece. The carbon graphite piece also has a long lead time for delivery as well.

I am working on getting a new one right now though but would prefer to fix this is one or see if it is okay to use it as is.

RE: Running only a single stage in a dual stage pump

(OP)
@pierreick, I am currently in contact with the vendor but they take a while to respond. It's been a message from both our ends per day for the past few days which is very inefficient.

We also don't have a process engineer. This is being used for composites work so it might be a different niche than you are anticipating.

Thanks for the advice!

RE: Running only a single stage in a dual stage pump

A sliding vain vacuum pump doesn't generate any axial thrust forces that need to be balanced out, I see no reason running a single stage on the pump would be a problem.

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