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Maximum Slope for Truck Parking Lot

Maximum Slope for Truck Parking Lot

Maximum Slope for Truck Parking Lot

(OP)


What is the maximum grade/gradient allowed for non-temporary (overnight or longer) parking/vehicle storage areas in parking lots for heavy-duty vehicles such as semi-trucks and buses?

All I could find is that the International Building Code allows a maximum gradient of 1:15 (6 2/3% grade) in any direction for parking spots, that the Americans with Disabilities Act allows 1:20 (5%) running/longitudinal maximum for accessible areas that do not count as ramps, and that the ADA allows a maximum of 1:48 (2.0833%), with 1:50 (2%) preferred maximum, in any direction for disabled parking spots.

On a related note, I could also find that the Federal Aviation Administration limits the runway to 1.5% longitudinal maximum for aircraft approach categories C, D, and E (all jet airliners (heavy-duty if such a classification existed) fall within this), that the FAA limits it to 0.8% maximum longitudinal for the first and last quarters of the runway for the same categories, and that the FAA limits airport aprons (parking areas) to 1% maximum in any direction for the same categories.

Similarly, I could find that most mainline railroads (more accurately railways) and metros limit it to 0.5%-1% maximum at station platforms, most mainlines 0.1%-0.25% maximum in parking and coupling/decoupling areas, most metros 0.15%-0.5% maximum in parking and coupling/decoupling areas, most light rails 1%-2% at station platforms, and most light rails 0.3%-0.5% in parking and coupling/decoupling areas.

So, is there any legal, industry, or trade association standard that sets a maximum slope for truck and bus long-term parking/vehicle storage areas, especially to prevent rollaways in case of brake failures? Here, I am not referring to loading docks, where there is a structure to rest against.

RE: Maximum Slope for Truck Parking Lot

I have no idea. Did you check the many state and Federal Highway Administration and the Federal Unified Facilities Guide Specifications? Surely the UFG has something about parking lots.

RE: Maximum Slope for Truck Parking Lot

I doubt there is one.

Any slope for a heavy vehicle that has brake failure will result in rolling and runaway. But then just park at 90 degrees to the slope. Unless you're sleeping in the truck(!)

Remember - More details = better answers
Also: If you get a response it's polite to respond to it.

RE: Maximum Slope for Truck Parking Lot

in Italy max allowed is 5%

RE: Maximum Slope for Truck Parking Lot

This sounds correct, provided this is just for truck parking. I had facility that had forklift loading of flatbed trailers in the yard, that had additional slope constraints on the forklift operations.

RE: Maximum Slope for Truck Parking Lot

Kwan - Don't double post. One or other of these posts may disappear and it's against site rules.

Remember - More details = better answers
Also: If you get a response it's polite to respond to it.

RE: Maximum Slope for Truck Parking Lot

Quote (Similarly, I could find that most mainline railroads (more accurately railways) and metros limit it to 0.5%-1%)


Due to tolerance, I've often encountered ponding water where slopes have been spec'd at 1%.

Rather than think climate change and the corona virus as science, think of it as the wrath of God. Feel any better?

-Dik

RE: Maximum Slope for Truck Parking Lot

Maximum slope for underground workings is usually 15% and we park wherever we can.

RE: Maximum Slope for Truck Parking Lot

If it's a ramp, then if more than 12%, I use 10' transitions at the top and bottom. If handicapped I think 1:20 is the max. I was thinking you were looking for a 'flat' parking area, not a slope. The loading dock info is good for loading docks.

Rather than think climate change and the corona virus as science, think of it as the wrath of God. Feel any better?

-Dik

RE: Maximum Slope for Truck Parking Lot

I'm fairly certain that current US standards are 6% grade maximum but up to 7% is allowed in certain cases.

RE: Maximum Slope for Truck Parking Lot

In these environs, ramps for parking garages are often greater than 7%.

Rather than think climate change and the corona virus as science, think of it as the wrath of God. Feel any better?

-Dik

RE: Maximum Slope for Truck Parking Lot

For 20% you definitely need transitions top and bottom of the ramp, else the car will 'bottom' out when it leaves/enters the ramp.

Rather than think climate change and the corona virus as science, think of it as the wrath of God. Feel any better?

-Dik

RE: Maximum Slope for Truck Parking Lot

You should try the ramps in Spanish underground parking. 25% is not uncommon. No transitions. When you reach street level facing blue sky, you cannot see anyone that happens to be walking on the sidewalk in front of you that you have to cross to get to the street. My own turn in off the street is 14% upwards. It's not comfortable opening the door uphill and tricky opening the hatchback with a tank of butane ready to roll out and over you, or if I happened to have put the eggs at the top of the bag, there won't be a full dozen left. We've got a lot of regular city streets with 20% grades. You definitely want to leave the tires turned when parking on those. You almost need to pop the clutch if someone parked too close on the downhill side. In Sevilla its flat. Everyone leaves the parking brake disengaged so you can parallel park close, then roll the adjacent parkers forward or back until you have just enough room to break out to the street.

RE: Maximum Slope for Truck Parking Lot

Quote (No transitions.)


You can easily bottom out, else your car has to have a high 'floorboard'.

Rather than think climate change and the corona virus as science, think of it as the wrath of God. Feel any better?

-Dik

RE: Maximum Slope for Truck Parking Lot

In general the distance between axles in EU is probably much less than in North America.

RE: Maximum Slope for Truck Parking Lot

Quote:

In these environs, ramps for parking garages are often greater than 7%.

Quote:

My son's condo parking garage exit ramp is steeper than 7%, closer to over 20%

Parking garages don't typically accommodate heavy trucks.

6% is the normally the max grade for an interstate highway in the US, and for secondary roads, it's up to 10%, but I think that has to do with overheating brakes on long downhill grades, so not applicable to parking. Although, I've seen some trucks really struggle to move at all trying to go up those 10% grades. Buses may struggle to move on that steep of a grade, due to the limits of their transmissions.

If it's in a location where ice could develop, it'll get real ugly, real fast at anything over about 2%.

Rod Smith, P.E., The artist formerly known as HotRod10

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