×
INTELLIGENT WORK FORUMS
FOR ENGINEERING PROFESSIONALS

Log In

Come Join Us!

Are you an
Engineering professional?
Join Eng-Tips Forums!
  • Talk With Other Members
  • Be Notified Of Responses
    To Your Posts
  • Keyword Search
  • One-Click Access To Your
    Favorite Forums
  • Automated Signatures
    On Your Posts
  • Best Of All, It's Free!
  • Students Click Here

*Eng-Tips's functionality depends on members receiving e-mail. By joining you are opting in to receive e-mail.

Posting Guidelines

Promoting, selling, recruiting, coursework and thesis posting is forbidden.

Students Click Here

Walking Columns - How Much is Too Much
7

Walking Columns - How Much is Too Much

Walking Columns - How Much is Too Much

(OP)
I'm polling the gang here to get a sense of everyone's opinion regarding the business of seriously walking columns as shown below. The project is a high rise building in a high seismic region. I get the whole walking column concept but feel that, at some point, there should be a rational limit. Some potential seismic consequences of this:

- you've got a significant, permanent lateral load on on the building that will ratchet under seismic yielding.

- you've got a significant, permanent torsion acting on your core that will ratchet under seismic yielding. I'm not sure that anybody even really knows how cores respond to torsion when they're already yielded as plastic hinges.

- vertical seismic accelerations are going to exacerbate the above concerns.

- the whole thing's got an inverted pendulum character to it.

Yeah, we've got irregularity penalties, ETABS, OpenSEES, PBD, and the rest... To me though, this still seems like hubris even with all of the fancy tools in hand. I'd like to hear how others feel about this kind of thing. Would you really want your kids on the 30th floor of this things start shaking?

I like to debate structural engineering theory -- a lot. If I challenge you on something, know that I'm doing so because I respect your opinion enough to either change it or adopt it.

RE: Walking Columns - How Much is Too Much

No, I don't like these monstrosities either, for all the reasons you listed. As well, I just hate the look of it. Saw that thing in Vancouver recently, and to see it described as "an examplar new urban typology" raised my blood pressure. It depends on which angle you view it from, and your picture isn't even from the worst viewpoint.

RE: Walking Columns - How Much is Too Much

I can't define how much is too much, but I know it when I see it.

RE: Walking Columns - How Much is Too Much

City Hall
Tempe, Arizona

RE: Walking Columns - How Much is Too Much

Quote:

- you've got a significant, permanent torsion acting on your core that will ratchet under seismic yielding. I'm not sure that anybody even really knows how cores respond to torsion when they're already yielded as plastic hinges.

That was exactly my reasoning for begging off to do something similar for a far shorter structure. Not sure what ASCE's ideas on this are since even with torsional irregularities, you can still build it if you do a dynamic analysis.

RE: Walking Columns - How Much is Too Much

Unfortunately, if an Architect can dream it, there's a structural engineer with a black box who thinks they can defy gravity and design it.
No one puts pictures of three story concrete frame building in the magazines.

RE: Walking Columns - How Much is Too Much

I've always been fascinated by the building that cvg posted. It is the library at UC San Diego, about the worst possible place to place an inverted pyramid in a seismic zone.

RE: Walking Columns - How Much is Too Much

And when we build it, it's painful as well.


I was looking over the shoulder of draftsman today, and saying - that can't be right - but its nearly identical to the first picture.

The same group will have a transfer beam sized to carry the load above with no deflection, but only overlap a stepped column a inch or two on a 5" slab.


RE: Walking Columns - How Much is Too Much

(OP)

Quote (hokie66)

Saw that thing in Vancouver recently

What's that now?? The next time that you find yourself anywhere within a short range nuclear launch of western Canada, I want to know about it in advance damn it. I won't quite fly to the south pacific to have a beer with you but I'll damn well high tail it out to Vancouver.

I like to debate structural engineering theory -- a lot. If I challenge you on something, know that I'm doing so because I respect your opinion enough to either change it or adopt it.

RE: Walking Columns - How Much is Too Much

Watching this building in Mexico City whip & twist during the Sept 20, 2017 Puebla Earthquake, it struck me that the acceleration of any large pieces of furniture that were not nailed down could be extremely dangerous to anyone in the building on the higher floors. It might even be difficult to stand while in a doorway. Maybe it is a life safety issue even before it is a structural issue? You could have lots of occupants unable to walk & no elevators.

RE: Walking Columns - How Much is Too Much

(OP)
I'd actually argue that cvg's building is not nearly so bad. It's short and, unless I'm mistaken, largely symmetrical. That eliminates all of my concerns other than the inverted pendulum stuff.

I like to debate structural engineering theory -- a lot. If I challenge you on something, know that I'm doing so because I respect your opinion enough to either change it or adopt it.

RE: Walking Columns - How Much is Too Much

KootK,
Thought about you and some of my other friends here, but I was doing the tourist thing with my wife, daughter, and son-in-law. They already think I neglect them for Eng-Tips at times.

RE: Walking Columns - How Much is Too Much

(OP)
Next time, make it happen. Just tell me where you'll be and when and I'll tail you like a crazy nutter. I wont' be the worst that your family will see on Robson street.

I like to debate structural engineering theory -- a lot. If I challenge you on something, know that I'm doing so because I respect your opinion enough to either change it or adopt it.

RE: Walking Columns - How Much is Too Much

I'd do it because I like a challenge, but I've also never designed high-seismic, high-rise so I'd probably regret it.

It seems to me that "too much" is the point when you start combining extremes and pushing the limits. Inverted pendulum; okay. Extreme torsional irregularity; okay. Combined extreme torsional irregularity and inverted pendulum and offset column irregularity and complex structural analysis and detailing; no way.

Short answer is I'd keep the types of irregularities to only one, or two; I'd make sure all the normal design conditions for modal analysis are not violated, and I'd make sure the detailing was simple and robust. If anything pushed me to the limits of "normal" analysis tools I'd pass. I'd also envelope the design like crazy to ensure that failure of joints and unanticipated distributions of forces were all considered. I'd budget a ton of time to preparing multiple analysis to ensure that all practical methods of analysis were utilized to envelope the design.

Finally, I'd remind myself about the Citicorp Tower design flaw. Maybe post a picture of the Citicorp Tower on the wall to remind myself each day not to miss anything.

All that said; this got built and seems to have managed well enough:

Ian Riley, PE, SE
Professional Engineer (ME, NH, MA) Structural Engineer (IL)
American Concrete Industries https://www.facebook.com/AmericanConcrete/

RE: Walking Columns - How Much is Too Much

Also, don't forget wind. While high seismic will certainly control, something like what you posted for a picture almost certainly will require wind tunnel testing to ensure you don't get any strange effects (vortex shedding will almost certainly be a problem).

Ian Riley, PE, SE
Professional Engineer (ME, NH, MA) Structural Engineer (IL)
American Concrete Industries https://www.facebook.com/AmericanConcrete/

RE: Walking Columns - How Much is Too Much

I'm not opposed to walking columns here or there. I've done a building with a 6 degree tilt on one side. But it was symmetric, easily understood with simple statics, and had a good lateral layout. You could come up with the static horizontal load with a pen, calculator, and a napkin.

This one is nuts though! My real concern is how do you deal with all the lateral seismic load that gets dumped in these walls. Do you design them all as special shear walls? All the diaphragms are getting locked together at so many points. If you treat them as columns, even the relatively small ones, how do you possibly get the slab to work for Mpr??

Looking at other photos of the building it looks like there are many, many of these walls pretending to be columns. Crazy.

https://urbanyvr.com/vancouver-house-bjarke-ingels...

RE: Walking Columns - How Much is Too Much

(OP)

Quote (TME)

All that said; this got built and seems to have managed well enough:

Again though, I'd argue that is not nearly as bad. Diagrid perimeter tubes. Nice, discrete load paths and gobs of torsional resistance. Additionally, an aspect of it that often gets over looked is that it's essentially a giant, single bay moment frame with a kink. You shed much of that cantilever action typical of high rises.

I like to debate structural engineering theory -- a lot. If I challenge you on something, know that I'm doing so because I respect your opinion enough to either change it or adopt it.

RE: Walking Columns - How Much is Too Much

Quote (KootK)

Again though, I'd argue that is not nearly as bad.

True, but I guess that's kind of my point. Crazy looking things can be done, but they need to be a lot simpler than they look. If you are getting into the realm of things that are actually crazy to design then I'd say you've gone too far.

Perhaps what this needs to be is you need to tell the architect what their building shape can be rather than the other way around.
When you figure out how to do this let me know...

Ian Riley, PE, SE
Professional Engineer (ME, NH, MA) Structural Engineer (IL)
American Concrete Industries https://www.facebook.com/AmericanConcrete/

RE: Walking Columns - How Much is Too Much

Quote (ajh1)

I've always been fascinated by the building that cvg posted. It is the library at UC San Diego, about the worst possible place to place an inverted pyramid in a seismic zone.

Not sure what that building is, but it is NOT the UCSD library. For us proud UCSD grads, we know the library looks like below.


Same basic concept though. Though I think the UCSD one is both more appealing aesthetically and appears more robust structurally. We used to ask our professors about what they thought of it. They would politely decline to comment. LOL.

RE: Walking Columns - How Much is Too Much

Yep, Tempe City Hall

RE: Walking Columns - How Much is Too Much

Eventually we get cocky and venture into the unknown without realizing it (see the FIU bridge failure).

KootK and the like have that educated and intuitive voice of reason lurking inside their heads. Not everyone has (or listens to) that voice.

RE: Walking Columns - How Much is Too Much

Quote (JLNJ )

Eventually we get cocky and venture into the unknown without realizing it...

This is what Petroski cautions us about.

Regards,

Mike

The problem with sloppy work is that the supply FAR EXCEEDS the demand

RE: Walking Columns - How Much is Too Much

(OP)
The litmus test that I apply to my own work is that I imagine a future where something has gone wrong and somebody has gotten hurt. I want to be able to credibly say to myself and to others "I believe that my decisions on this project were aggressive but in accord with good engineering judgement given the state of the art in structural engineering at the time". With something like this, what would you say:

- I allowed the center of mass to needlessly be shifted high on the building.

- I allowed a torsional vibration mode to become one of my dominant vibration modes.

- I allowed my vertical vibration modes to become coupled to my torsional vibration modes.

- I invited a high degree of torsional irregularity into a major structure.

- I knowingly invited permanent lateral and torsional loads into a core made of a material characterized by creep deformation.

- I knowingly invited torsional seismic ratcheting into a concrete box section for which behavior under plastic hinging is poorly understood.

- I did all of this because I've got 4000 pages of CSI Perform output saying that everything was fine.

My eng-soul would be blackened beyond redemption I fear.

I like to debate structural engineering theory -- a lot. If I challenge you on something, know that I'm doing so because I respect your opinion enough to either change it or adopt it.

RE: Walking Columns - How Much is Too Much

There is a building in my home town very much like cvg's photo. We call it the upside down building. It is in the news every so often and the Government tenants swear that the building moves during high winds.
How the architects and the engineers come up with these boggles me.

RE: Walking Columns - How Much is Too Much

2

Quote (James E. Amrhein - Masonry Institute of America)

"Structural engineering is the art of molding materials we don't wholly understand, into shapes we can't fully analyze, so as to withstand forces we can't really assess, in such a way that the community at large has no reason to suspect the extent of our ignorance."

RE: Walking Columns - How Much is Too Much

(OP)
@Trenno: it's a great quote and fitting here but it fails to draw a line in the sand. Does it mean that we should be cautious? Or does it mean than any one wacky structure is really not so much wackier than any other and we should just maintain our facade in all instances? I know you do a lot of large and complex work these days. I'd love to hear your own personal opinion of the matter.

I like to debate structural engineering theory -- a lot. If I challenge you on something, know that I'm doing so because I respect your opinion enough to either change it or adopt it.

RE: Walking Columns - How Much is Too Much

In the relative scheme of things, I'm still very green in the structural engineering sphere, so my opinion doesn't hold much weight.

What I will say however, is that I recommend people listen to Sean Brady's podcasts. He's a brilliant forensic structural engineer, who has been featured in the IStructE magazine many times. In regards to the topic at hand, I find his ideas/comments regarding the progression and development of bridge design/construction techniques very relevant to this discussion. It essentially goes along the lines of... engineers are always pushing the envelope and every now and then a failure happens; will provide not only a reality check but also redefines a limit. This limit changes as we witness failures and then learn from them. It's a harsh but true reality.

https://bradyheywood.libsyn.com/

EDIT: There's even a podcast on the Citicorp Tower Crisis for you, TME.

RE: Walking Columns - How Much is Too Much

(OP)

Quote (Trenno)

In the relative scheme of things, I'm still very green in the structural engineering sphere, so my opinion doesn't hold much weight.

Pfft. Over the years here I've gotten a good measure of you as an engineer and I respect your intuition. Give me your weightless opinion damnit. You know I'd do it for you.

I certainly agree with Brady, of course, that ours is a reactive profession. And that's weird space. Pushing the envelope reaps great rewards for individual practitioners. And occasionally puts people in harm's way in very real sense.

I can't name names but I'm friendly with one of the dominant academic thinkers in seismic engineering, formerly a professor at the university of British Columbia in Vancouver. I recall sitting in his office a few years back and asking his opinion of some other things I don't love in Vancouver. I think it was transfer slab punching shear, the "wallumn" issue that DETstru mentioned, and a one sided coupling beam detail often used when there's hardly any return wall left on one side of the opening (it's atrocious). All of these trouble me in high seismic regions. He leaned in and said something to the tune of "if people here had experienced an earthquake in their lifetimes, or understood any of the recent developments in NZ, I can't imagine any of them wanting to live in any of these terrible 30 story...". He then cut himself off and said that there are limits to what he ought to be saying given the close ties that the university has to local developers and engineering firms. I could see the concern on his face and it was, truly, a very sobering moment for me.

I like to debate structural engineering theory -- a lot. If I challenge you on something, know that I'm doing so because I respect your opinion enough to either change it or adopt it.

RE: Walking Columns - How Much is Too Much

While we are quoting, I'm quite fond of this one which I think sums up engineering and the engineer's burden.

Quote (Herbert Hoover)

“It is a great profession. There is the fascination of watching a figment of the imagination emerge through the aid of science to a plan on paper. Then it moves to realization in stone or metal or energy. Then it brings jobs and homes to men. Then it elevates the standards of living and adds to the comforts of life. That is the engineer’s high privilege.

The great liability of the engineer compared to men of other professions is that his works are out in the open where all can see them. His acts, step by step, are in hard substance. He cannot bury his mistakes in the grave like the doctors. He cannot argue them into thin air or blame the judge like the lawyers. He cannot, like the architects, cover his failures with trees and vines. He cannot, like the politicians, screen his shortcomings by blaming his opponents and hope the people will forget. The engineer simply cannot deny he did it. If his works do not work, he is damned…

On the other hand, unlike the doctor his is not a life among the weak. Unlike the soldier, destruction is not his purpose. Unlike the lawyer, quarrels are not his daily bread. To the engineer falls the job of clothing the bare bones of science with life, comfort, and hope. No doubt as years go by the people forget which engineer did it, even if they ever knew. Or some politician puts his name on it. Or they credit it to some promoter who used other people’s money . . . But the engineer himself looks back at the unending stream of goodness which flows from his successes with satisfactions that few professions may know. And the verdict of his fellow professionals is all the accolade he wants

Don't forget in terms of the building response that you have active/passive seismic controls up your sleeve, things like tuned mass dampers can work wonders to improve undesirable responses.

I'm not to worried about people/companies who understand and address all the risks involved (kootk's list among other things), what really worries me is people/companies who really don't understand or appreciate the risks. I seem to see this all the time as a reviewer, some fundamental thing being missed or treated in an overly simplistic manner.

RE: Walking Columns - How Much is Too Much

Quote (KootK)

Give me your weightless opinion damnit. You know I'd do it for you.

I would like to think the profession as a whole should aim to rephrase a few words in your list. "I made allowance for..." and "I acknowledged and designed/detailed accordingly for..." It'd be quite a task to curtail mankind's pursuit of progression. However we should keep in mind, as I alluded to previously, perhaps some of the limits of our structural designs aren't quite known yet.

However I'll never forget something my mentor told me... if it looks wrong, it probably is.

RE: Walking Columns - How Much is Too Much

(OP)
You may have missed your true calling as a lawyer Trenno. You're displaying some seriously skillful straight answer dodging here. Fine, remain non-committal.

Quote (Agent666)

Don't forget in terms of the building response that you have active/passive seismic controls up your sleeve, things like tuned mass dampers can work wonders to improve undesirable responses.

Yeah, I'm happy to acknowledge that there may be some excellent engineering voodoo going on that I simply can't see. And I'd love to hear of it if anyone knows what the heck it is. An example of something that I simply don't know enough about to understand is shown below. Gotta be something going on there? Column transfer to the interior? Maybe they're not actually structural columns after all?

I also have a problem with supplemental control devices and, in a broader sense, performance based concepts in general. It'll be the subject of another thread eventually. Seems to me that all that stuff is based on the statistically infused "knowing" of things. I think that this is headed in the wrong direction and that the true genius of capacity design was always that you weren't really relying on knowing much. Nature tends to frown upon over-clever engineers who think that they know things.

Quote (Agent666)

I'm not to worried about people/companies who understand and address all the risks involved

I know the firm. They have experience with passive control systems and performance based design. They're as competent as anyone outside academia in that regard I'd say.



I like to debate structural engineering theory -- a lot. If I challenge you on something, know that I'm doing so because I respect your opinion enough to either change it or adopt it.

RE: Walking Columns - How Much is Too Much

I'm sure that is just the Façade being expressed? Not the actual columns and transfers at each level. If it is the columns I'd be very surprised.

RE: Walking Columns - How Much is Too Much

Koot that's probably just the facade. You can tell which ones are the columns (which are really walls) because you see shadow of the overhanging slab at their top. The ones without shadow are facade elements.

I still want to know what they do with all the shear and flexure that ends up in those walls...

RE: Walking Columns - How Much is Too Much

For the record, I hate that building every time I look at it.

I wonder, though, if those offset walls are to avoid providing vertical stiffness there. If you had a direct load path, it would presumably be the stiffest part of the structure, since it's furthest from the center of gravity. Making sure that you control the load paths is pretty important if you're going to do a complicated analysis and try to control the seismic response. Controlling vertical stiffness makes sense both if they're part of the shear system or if they're just façade.

RE: Walking Columns - How Much is Too Much

(OP)
Yeah, I feel as though the general proportions are anathema to most people's sensibilities. I suspect that's actually part of the architectural intent. You know, to evoke an emotional response etc. The sister building is in Calgary and I find it nearly as unappealing aesthetically. The fact that the top heavy one ought to have been in Calgary and Calgary's in Vancouver is just more fuel on the KootK emotional response fire.

I like to debate structural engineering theory -- a lot. If I challenge you on something, know that I'm doing so because I respect your opinion enough to either change it or adopt it.

RE: Walking Columns - How Much is Too Much

(OP)
And then there's this one that I discovered shortly after initiating this thread. Sometimes I feel as though the universe is just mocking me. Although, again, I can think of several factors that actually make this not so bad. It's bottom heavy, largely symmetrical, torsionally not so bad, and obviously endowed with an intentionally stocky shear wall system. And, technically, I suppose that those are not actually walked columns. I'd be curious to know how the detailing of the column/slab joints went for the curvy ones. I'd almost think you'd have to just stick some central dowels in there and call 'em all pinned.

I like to debate structural engineering theory -- a lot. If I challenge you on something, know that I'm doing so because I respect your opinion enough to either change it or adopt it.

RE: Walking Columns - How Much is Too Much

Where is that guitar structure? I find that hilarious for some reason.

Also, great use/location of the shear wall.

RE: Walking Columns - How Much is Too Much

That last one is sure going to be a sweet looking guitar when it's done.

RE: Walking Columns - How Much is Too Much

Your scientists engineers were so preoccupied with whether or not they could, they didn’t stop to think if they should...

RE: Walking Columns - How Much is Too Much

DETstru,

Are you concerned that the buildings are going to mate in the wild?wink

Apologies to KootK for totally derailing the thread...

RE: Walking Columns - How Much is Too Much

The last one is located at the Hard Rock Casino in Broward County, Florida. No seismic concerns there.

Here are some other cool pictures of the project:
Link

I wonder if the horizontal component of the column forces are removed - or added - from the p.t. slab pre-compression during design.

RE: Walking Columns - How Much is Too Much

I want to start a new thread that is just about structures that really push the envelope. But maybe the mods will delete it because it's not really a question thread...

I stumbled across this little gem in Warsaw, Poland on the weekend. Wonder what K Factor they adopted...







RE: Walking Columns - How Much is Too Much

Do they have earthquakes?

RE: Walking Columns - How Much is Too Much

I cant imagine thats taking all the axial load of 20 floors, perhaps theyre relying on transferring loads back to the main part of the structure.

RE: Walking Columns - How Much is Too Much

Must have used an HP calculator for that one.

RE: Walking Columns - How Much is Too Much

Man... takes a certain bravado that I do not have to design that building Trenno...

RE: Walking Columns - How Much is Too Much

(OP)
Keeps things nice and simple for the terrorists.

I like to debate structural engineering theory -- a lot. If I challenge you on something, know that I'm doing so because I respect your opinion enough to either change it or adopt it.

RE: Walking Columns - How Much is Too Much

Have they also got apartments in the column ?

RE: Walking Columns - How Much is Too Much

You could almost get a lift in there?

RE: Walking Columns - How Much is Too Much

(OP)
Tommy's paper looks informative. Anybody know enough German to help us parse out any interesting bits? I'd be curious to know if the building has been designed with specific robustness in mind. The top floor and mid-height transfer level both look as though they could harbor pretty substantial structure. And the core is not interrupted by the building cut. Perhaps the thing could survive the loss of the mega-column.

I like to debate structural engineering theory -- a lot. If I challenge you on something, know that I'm doing so because I respect your opinion enough to either change it or adopt it.

RE: Walking Columns - How Much is Too Much

That translator is pretty impressive.

BA

RE: Walking Columns - How Much is Too Much

Written by designer:
....This 5-star hotels distinct architectural style with its outstanding open space on the lower levels is based on building constraints that stipulated that the residential units located behind the hotel had to receive a certain minimum of sunlight!!!. This task’s solution turned out one highly specific challenge for our engineers and, at the same time, contributed to the structure’s appeal....surprise

RE: Walking Columns - How Much is Too Much

(OP)
Yeah, the translator worked astonishingly well. For what it's worth, the guitar thing is DiSimone's handiwork. Clip below is from their website.

I like to debate structural engineering theory -- a lot. If I challenge you on something, know that I'm doing so because I respect your opinion enough to either change it or adopt it.

RE: Walking Columns - How Much is Too Much

Have any of you guys been to Rotterdam? The city is packed with this type of buildings. Someone said the architects being all high was the reason :). You rarely see a building without something being cantilevered.

KootK, is there any way in which I can get a short message to you?

RE: Walking Columns - How Much is Too Much

I've never been to Rotterdam, but have been to several Dutch cities which have many leaning buildings, not by design. Perhaps the architects in Rotterdam just decided to emphasize that their buildings were intentionally leaning.

RE: Walking Columns - How Much is Too Much

(OP)

Quote (Eaglee)

KootK, is there any way in which I can get a short message to you?

There is if you can sort out a little riddle. Just click on my handle to take you to my member profile and see what you can make of the first line.

RE: Walking Columns - How Much is Too Much

(OP)

Quote (eaglee)

KootK, is there any way in which I can get a short message to you?

Did you give up? I was looking forward to hearing from you.

RE: Walking Columns - How Much is Too Much

2
Looks like they forgot to turn off the modal deflected shape.



RE: Walking Columns - How Much is Too Much

I worked in a building next door to this one while on a job near Rome. The details are interesting, considering it is a high-seismic region.

The escape stairway made me chuckle a little. What if the fire was near the base? You'd be walking towards it...


-5^2 = -25 winky smile

http://www.eng-tips.com/supportus.cfm

Red Flag This Post

Please let us know here why this post is inappropriate. Reasons such as off-topic, duplicates, flames, illegal, vulgar, or students posting their homework.

Red Flag Submitted

Thank you for helping keep Eng-Tips Forums free from inappropriate posts.
The Eng-Tips staff will check this out and take appropriate action.

Reply To This Thread

Posting in the Eng-Tips forums is a member-only feature.

Click Here to join Eng-Tips and talk with other members! Already a Member? Login


Resources

White Paper - How ESI is Helping Move New Medical Device Product to Market Quicker & More Cost Effic
Early Supplier Involvement has long been a strategy employed by manufacturers to produce innovative products. Now, it almost seems like a necessity. Because decisions made in the design phase can positively affect product quality and costs, this can help add value to OEM bottom lines. This white paper will discuss many facets of ESI, including why it’s so valuable today, what challenges limit the benefits of ESI, how cost is impacted, and more. Download Now
White Paper - Moving to a Driverless Future
This white paper describes what we see as the best practices to support a sustainable engineering process for autonomous vehicle design. It exposes how to use simulation and testing in common frameworks to enable design exploration, verification and validation for the development of autonomous cars at a system, software and full-vehicle level to drive a mature product development process for automated driving. Download Now
Research Report - How Engineers are Using Remote Access
Remote access enables engineers to work from anywhere provided they have an internet connection. We surveyed our audience of engineers, designers and product managers to learn how they use remote access within their organizations. We wanted to know which industries have adopted remote access, which software they are using, and what features matter most. Download Now

Close Box

Join Eng-Tips® Today!

Join your peers on the Internet's largest technical engineering professional community.
It's easy to join and it's free.

Here's Why Members Love Eng-Tips Forums:

Register now while it's still free!

Already a member? Close this window and log in.

Join Us             Close