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Oops, pushed the wrong button
10

Oops, pushed the wrong button

RE: Oops, pushed the wrong button

We should encourage The Prez to golf even more than he already does.

Mike Halloran
Pembroke Pines, FL, USA

RE: Oops, pushed the wrong button

RE: Oops, pushed the wrong button

I found it ironic that the news article about the mistake was itself followed with two corrections.

Bill
--------------------
"Why not the best?"
Jimmy Carter

RE: Oops, pushed the wrong button

Within a few minutes of this notice going out, but well before the mistake was publicly acknowledged, the White House released a statement saying that it was actually an exercise.

John R. Baker, P.E. (ret)
EX-Product 'Evangelist'
Irvine, CA
Siemens PLM:
UG/NX Museum:

The secret of life is not finding someone to live with
It's finding someone you can't live without

RE: Oops, pushed the wrong button

Lots of panic on Saturday morning for me. I was working at an Oahu quarry when the alert came in. We all rushed to an old out-of-service aggregate crusher - 4 foot thick concrete walls, and roof.

It is interesting - at the quarry I NEVER get cell/mobile reception and my phone stated "No Service" on Saturday, however I did receive the alert, and eventually the cancellation of the alert too. Can anyone explain why that is/was?

RE: Oops, pushed the wrong button

Texts use a very low fidelity and separate comm channel that is far more robust than the phone or data channels.

Keith Cress
kcress - http://www.flaminsystems.com

RE: Oops, pushed the wrong button

Quote (itsmoked)

Texts use a very low fidelity and separate comm channel that is far more robust than the phone or data channels.

Makes sense. Thanks, itsmoked.

RE: Oops, pushed the wrong button

4
It was NOT the Trump administration!

It WAS a single Hawaiian (deliberately left unnamed and hidden!) bureaucrat deliberately pushing the "override" ("Are you sure you want to send this message?) second-check control on the program controller. After 40 years of "no public drills" policy at all! (In fact, at least one group (a NW city) deliberately wrote a law saying they would NOT comply with any public nuclear drill at all. ) Is it NOT rather to the credit of the trump administration that the drill was being run at all? That the drill was run when the stock markets were closed, and that the drill DID make the previous three administration actually responsible for those nuclear warheads being built, being armed, and being installed on workable missiles with workable staging technology and working re-entry thermal shields becoming a credible threat to the US soil?

Now, how is it possible to blame the blame the President for a Washington-level decision to run a drill for the actual deliberate and specific error of a civil defense bureaucrat in a different state? Ultimate accountability? Certainly. But specific accountability?

RE: Oops, pushed the wrong button

Thank you racookpe1978.

It is better to have enough ideas for some of them to be wrong, than to be always right by having no ideas at all.

RE: Oops, pushed the wrong button

Typical civil servant... he wasn't fired for incompetence, he was re-assigned...

RE: Oops, pushed the wrong button

Explsnstion of error:

A false alarm warning Hawaiians of an incoming ballistic missile on Saturday, was reportedly issued because of a “terribly designed” user interface.

The computer system that allows the Hawaiian Emergency Management Agency (HEMA) to send emergency alerts asks employees to select the type of alert that they are sending from a drop-down menu.

Among the options available are two for missile alerts, according to the Washington Post. One is labelled “test missile alert”, which will test the notification system is working without actually sending an alert to the public.

The other is labelled “missile alert”. Selecting that option will send an alert to every mobile phone in Hawaii, warning recipients to “seek immediate shelter” – and specifically noting that “this is not a drill”. That was the option the HEMA employee mistakenly selected.

It was, in fact, a drill. The one-word difference between the two menu options was easily overlooked, and there is only one other difference in the system between the test alert and the real thing: a confirmation prompt, which the employee also clicked through.

“This sounds like terrible user interface design to me,” said computer security expert Graham Cluley. “Why have the genuine ‘Jeez Louise! Freak out everybody!’ option slap-bang next to one the harmless ‘Test the brown alert’ option?

“Even though the menu option still required confirmation that the user really wanted to send an alert, that wasn’t enough, on this occasion, to prevent the worker from robotically clicking onwards.”

In the days since the alert, HEMA has made a number of tweaks to the computer system to prevent a repeat of the error. It has added a “cancellation button”, allowing users to send a second alert over the same system that notifies recipients that the first was a false alarm. On Saturday, sending that second “false alarm” alert required extraordinary permission, delaying it for 38 minutes.

HEMA has also added a requirement for a second person to confirm the message to be sent, hopefully preventing the first from simply clicking through mistakenly.

“It was too easy — for anyone — to make such a big mistake,” HEMA spokesman Richard Rapoza told the Post.

RE: Oops, pushed the wrong button

The flight time to Hawaii for an ICBM launched from Asia would be less than 10 minutes (from China, Pakistan, NK for example). The flight time to Hawaii for an ICBM launched from a submarine may be as short as 1-2 minutes. One would have to conclude that the use of an early warning system would be somewhat worthless for an incoming H bomb.

This incident is a good example of the need to eliminate nuclear weapons because of the risk of a accidental use.

RE: Oops, pushed the wrong button

I guess the alert could be called 'Fake News'.

RE: Oops, pushed the wrong button

I've got friends visiting Hawaii at the time. I'll be interested to hear their take on it. :)

The problem with sloppy work is that the supply FAR EXCEEDS the demand

RE: Oops, pushed the wrong button

IRstuff,
I was surprised that you found all those things "good" and "positive".

RE: Oops, pushed the wrong button

8:07 AM. False alarm generated by HI Emergency Management Authority. That false alarm is automatically broadcast on all HI TV, radio, and to all HI cell phones.

8:10 AM. The US Pacific command reports to the governors office and Hawaii Emergency Management Authority that there was no attack in progress. HI police notified that the previous alarm was false.

8:30 AM. The (democrat) Governor of HI put a notice out on HIS Facebook page that this was a false alarm.
(Does he think this is an adequate response?)

8:45 AM. HI EMA announced that this was a false alarm, releases automatic message notice to Emergency Action network.

(NO automatic updates nor corrections notice was sent to all stations nor to any cell phone networks was reported coming from HI EMA between 8:10 and 8:45! But notice that the original "false alarm" notification was sent specifically DURING a test of the system, and thus IMMEDIATELY known that it was a false alarm! Even if the button-pusher civil employee bueaucrat failed to notice he pushed the wrong button, he KNEW there was no actual attack, his boss KNEW there was no actual attack in progress, his supervisor AND the HI EMA KNEW there was no actual attack going on! )

(By the way, is it not odd that the original "20 minute nuclear attack alert" was exceeded by more than twice the flight time before anyone "noticed" that there were no nuclear bombs going off, and that the first alert was demonstrably false? Your government at work!)

RE: Oops, pushed the wrong button

"I was surprised that you found all those things "good" and "positive"."

Trump took credit, ipso, he thought they were good. The economy grew; that was a good thing. Most everything else was a disaster, so all the more reason...

"8:07 AM. False alarm generated by HI Emergency Management Authority. That false alarm is automatically broadcast on all HI TV, radio, and to all HI cell phones."

Apparently, no one in HI Emergency Management Authority was subscribed to the emergency broadcast???

TTFN (ta ta for now)
I can do absolutely anything. I'm an expert! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BKorP55Aqvg
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RE: Oops, pushed the wrong button

Don't blame Trump for this as he was golfing at the time:

"A senior U.S. official told The Post that Trump was at his Florida golf course at Mar-a-Lago when the scare happened and knew “soon after” that the alerts had been determined false."

https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/post-nation/wp...


"EMA Administrator Mr. Vern Miyagi said that there was no template in the system for an alert retraction, and so the all-clear message had to be manually entered and activated, accounting for some of the delay."

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-5269419/Ma...


"Daniel-San, lie become truth only if person wanna believe it." - Mr. Miyagi



RE: Oops, pushed the wrong button

I understand there was NO "This was a false alarm" message, nor any other "Free Text" message option allowing the state bureaucrats to actually "update" or "inform the public" of any new information as this, or other emergency (tsunami, volcano, tornado (unlikely in HI), typhoon or forest fires or meteor impact) developed.

"Sure, we will give you an automatic alarm message., Then, we cannot give you any more information"
Typical pluggin' bureaucrat with a tens of millions budget. And no brain.

RE: Oops, pushed the wrong button

Sounds like it was designed with input from the Dooms Day Machine in "Dr Strangelove"

Muffley:
But, how is it possible for this thing to be triggered automatically, and at the same time impossible to untrigger?

Strangelove:
Mr. President, it is not only possible, it is essential. That is the whole idea of this machine, you know.

RE: Oops, pushed the wrong button

Dr. Strangelove... I think that is my favorite movie of all time! thumbsup2

"Schiefgehen wird, was schiefgehen kann" - das Murphygesetz

RE: Oops, pushed the wrong button

Several years back, I was sitting here at my desk and started hearing sirens. Not the normal emergency vehicle sirens, but something stationary. Nobody in the office knew what they were for or anything.
So I called the city, they didn't know anything about any sirens going off or what they meant, they did know they weren't city sirens.
I think I finally contacted the county, and learned those were generic "emergency" sirens, used for tornadoes, terrorists, attacking Godzillas or whatever the emergency of the moment was. And that was their periodic test.
I thought it was funny to have an emergency warning system when nobody had the slightest clue what to do when they heard it.

RE: Oops, pushed the wrong button

We have sirens for the nuke plants but I think if you are within earshot when they go super critical you are to close for the sirens to do any good. Wait, what's that sound in the distance?

----------------------------------------

The Help for this program was created in Windows Help format, which depends on a feature that isn't included in this version of Windows.

RE: Oops, pushed the wrong button


Quote (JStephen (Mechanical))



Several years back, I was sitting here at my desk and started hearing sirens. Not the normal emergency vehicle sirens, but something stationary. Nobody in the office knew what they were for or anything.
So I called the city, they didn't know anything about any sirens going off or what they meant, they did know they weren't city sirens. I think I finally contacted the county, and learned those were generic "emergency" sirens, used for tornadoes, terrorists, attacking Godzillas or whatever the emergency of the moment was. And that was their periodic test. I thought it was funny to have an emergency warning system when nobody had the slightest clue what to do when they heard it.

Good point. Usually these tests are scheduled, for example "The sirens are tested at 10:00 a.m. on the first Tuesday of each month from March to October."

RE: Oops, pushed the wrong button

3
We want to point fingers. Someone made a mistake a pushed the wrong button in a poorly designed interface. It's easy to point the finger at them.

But there is also the current state of the world political affairs that contributed to how this alert was perceived and received by the public. The "nuclear d**k swinging contest" approach of a certain leader to mitigating this threat definitely factored into the response to the incident. Two years ago this would have been met more with skepticism and questions than it would have been with people popping manhole covers and going into the sewer to try to survive.

RE: Oops, pushed the wrong button

Turns out the message was sent intentionally by someone who heard a recorded message that stated "This is not a drill" during a drill (full timeline within):
https://transition.fcc.gov/Daily_Releases/Daily_Bu...

Quote:

• The midnight shift supervisor plays a recording over the phone that properly includes the drill language “EXERCISE, EXERCISE, EXERCISE,” but also erroneously contains the text of an EAS message for a live ballistic missile alert, including the language, “THIS IS NOT A DRILL.” The recording does not follow the script contained in HI-EMA’s standard operating procedure for this drill.
• The day shift warning officers receive this recorded message on speakerphone.
• While other warning officers understand that this is a drill, the warning officer at the alert origination terminal claimed to believe, in a written statement provided to HI-EMA, that this was a real emergency, not a drill.
• This day shift warning officer responds, as trained for a real event, by transmitting a live incoming ballistic missile alert to the State of Hawaii.

RE: Oops, pushed the wrong button

Oh no! Mr. Miyagi had to step down Tuesday. Does Daniel know?

RE: Oops, pushed the wrong button

A report today mentioned that the button pusher had been fired, apparently this was not the first time he had heard the Phrase " This is not a drill" and had pushed the button.
B.E.

You are judged not by what you know, but by what you can do.

RE: Oops, pushed the wrong button

So many failures at so many levels... I would expect multiple people to get the axe, not just one.

Dan - Owner
http://www.Hi-TecDesigns.com

RE: Oops, pushed the wrong button

"apparently this was not the first time he had heard the Phrase " This is not a drill" and had pushed the button. "

I have to ask, if he heard the phrase 'this is not a drill', isn't he SUPPOSED to push the button?

RE: Oops, pushed the wrong button

The following from HotAir.com, written by Jazz Shaw. It confirms the employee (male or female is never made clear) apparently MADE THE SAME ERROR several times before!

https://hotair.com/archives/2018/01/31/hawaii-fals...

Okay, “fired” probably isn’t the technical term for it. The worker in question actually submitted his resignation. But do we really think this was a decision he arrived at on his own? Unlikely at best. But the Washington Post reports that the letter of resignation was accepted by the boss and he’s no longer working there. (I’ll repeat the fact that we don’t actually know the worker’s gender, but I’m going with “he” by default. My apologies if this turns out to be a woman.)

But there’s another, somewhat more disturbing angle to this story, which started out as terrifying but has grown more and more bizarre since the original incident. This wasn’t the first time that this particular worker had been in trouble for “confusing” drills with real-world threats. And he’s been a “source of concern” to HEMA management for a decade. (Washington Examiner)

Hawaii Gov. David Ige, a Democrat, apologized for the incident and said it was a “terrifying day when our worst nightmares appeared to become a reality.”

The report from Hawaii officials found that the employee who sent out the false alert earlier this month “has been a source of concern” to other workers “for over 10 years,” according to the Washington Post.

The worker also mixed up real-world scenarios and drills “on at least two separate occasions.”

Allahpundit already looked at the alarming claim that the worker allegedly believed there was a missile heading their way when he “pushed the wrong button.” That’s disturbing enough. But to find out that he confused the real world with some dystopian hellscape fantasy twice before and was still the person responsible for operating that warning system means the fault for this debacle shifts to his superiors.

From the beginning, there were some other, more benign possibilities under discussion. Maybe he was new on the job and wasn’t used to the routine. Perhaps the computer system is poorly designed with a confusing interface making it easy to screw up like that. But now we know that he had been there for at least ten years and had made this sort of error before. Presumably, it never got all the way to the stage of sending out the alert or we’d have known about it, but it was obviously close enough for them to record the incidents.

Knowing all that, how is it that he was still allowed to run that alert software? Surely the complete freakout which followed the false alarm can’t have taken them by surprise. They had to know what a complete disaster that would lead to, right? Couldn’t the worker have been given some other duty in the chain of command which didn’t leave him at the keyboard when the final Go/No Go decision was made?

The worker’s careeer there may be over but the investigation clearly isn’t. If his is the only head to roll I’ll be surprised. Somebody was in charge of this operation and knew there were problems at that work station. And they’re probably going to have to be held accountable.

RE: Oops, pushed the wrong button

I'm with TenPenny on this. Perhaps drill messages should never state that they aren't. Obviously we need to blame the one pushing the button rather than the one crafting or choosing the message.

RE: Oops, pushed the wrong button

From another report,
When the drill was started a notice would appear only visible to operators ( button pushers.), stating that a drill was imminent and to ignore the phrase " This is not a drill.". Apparently on at least two occasions the operator in question had missed the preamble to the drill.
B.E.

You are judged not by what you know, but by what you can do.

RE: Oops, pushed the wrong button

So, the system was setup to give a message to the final operators on their screens to ignore a near future message that will come through saying it's not a drill? That sounds like a really stupid setup. What happens if there is a real alert during the testing time? What happens if the operator decides to not send a real alert? What happens if the operator is slow to push the button or wants more confirmation? Shouldn't the system simulate a real alert start to the end, and just capture the message sending?

Just wondering. How many people man this systems at once? It doesn't sound like you need more than a person on duty to click an option on a computer terminal. BUT, it sounds like something that should require 2 people to confirm the action. Otherwise, what stops someone who's sick of their job or having a bad day or has decided they're going to quit from clicking the wrong button just for fun to see what happens.

The reports and explanations sound like typical cover my ass BS. I agree with the other comments. If you're told "this is not a drill, press the warning button" then you should be pressing the warning button.

RE: Oops, pushed the wrong button

What!!!!!
Are you kidding me?

An on screen button, not even a real button

That's just crazy

RE: Oops, pushed the wrong button

Quote (MacGyverS2000)

So many failures at so many levels... I would expect multiple people to get the axe, not just one.
If that was the case, then why fire the poor bugger who pushed the button? If the failures occurred on multiple levels, it means he wasn't trained, his superiors did not understand what was required, bureaucratic inertia, etc. IMO he is just the scapegoat here.

"Everyone is entitled to their own opinions, but they are not entitled to their own facts."

RE: Oops, pushed the wrong button

You know, it makes me wonder if that wasn't just an intentional screw-the-system action and not an accident. Either that, or there's somebody dumber than a rock involved.

Of course, now they're going to set it up where they have to have a committee meeting and vote on it before doing anything, so if there IS an incoming ICBM, no warning will go out.

RE: Oops, pushed the wrong button

It sounds to me like someone "making a point" that if it says "this is not a drill" then they should press the button...

I.e. if it is a drill, don't say it isn't!

RE: Oops, pushed the wrong button

From a political discussion website ....



For more comments, none of them excusing the incident that paniced hundreds of thousands - and would have cost trillions of dollars if done during a stock trading day - see http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-news/3628737/p...

RE: Oops, pushed the wrong button

Looks like missile warning guy was picked up by AccuWeather:




https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/capital-weathe...

Quote:

Partly sunny with a chance of tsunami — that’s the forecast residents along the East Coast woke up to on Tuesday morning.

Actually, only the AccuWeather customers woke up to the alert, that a tsunami was imminent. Phones buzzed with the push alert from Connecticut to Florida. Somewhere along the line, the fact that this was only a test got lost in translation for Accuweather’s mobile apps and notification services.

If users had clicked through the app and then into the warning text itself, they may have seen that it was just a test. But that’s the kind of nuance that gets lost in the threat of a tsunami.


RE: Oops, pushed the wrong button

Years ago Jay Leno, when he was still doing the Tonight Show, joked about how whenever there was a tsunami warning in SoCal, that hundreds of people would flock to the beaches to see if it was real. After all, if there actually was going to be a tsunami, why would you want to miss it.

John R. Baker, P.E. (ret)
EX-Product 'Evangelist'
Irvine, CA
Siemens PLM:
UG/NX Museum:

The secret of life is not finding someone to live with
It's finding someone you can't live without

RE: Oops, pushed the wrong button

Or go surfing in it.

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