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independent suspension differential stub shaft "bearings"

independent suspension differential stub shaft "bearings"

independent suspension differential stub shaft "bearings"

(OP)
It seems typical to plug each stub shaft right into the side of the diff and engage the side gears. With an open diff When the wheels go different speeds rounding a turn or playing in the snow the stub shafts run at speeds +/- the ring gear/diff carrier speed.  The bearing that supports and centers the highly finished steel stub shaftjournal is just a nicely fitted hole in the iron/steel diff carrier.

Is this how everybody does it?  Or are some diffs bushed?

RE: independent suspension differential stub shaft "bearings"

That's similar to how our buggy is/was. We use a solid shaft for the diff now with the high angle CV joints and drive shaft to the hubs.

99 Dodge CTD dually.

RE: independent suspension differential stub shaft "bearings"

We have used bushings and/or bearings in our home-built FSAE diffs for several years.

If the inner stub shaft can move radially at all, then it will due to centripetal force. That will just put the axle at a larger angle than it needs to be, and potentially can mess things up.

Right now we have a replaceable, small-tolerance brass bushing on the inner side of the stub and a needle roller bearing on the outside, directly behind the oil seal. I would worry about having a hardened steel stub shaft restrained by one steel bushing or hole.  

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