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PIP VESBI002

PIP VESBI002

PIP VESBI002

(OP)
PIP VESBI002: Design and Fabrication of Bulk Solids Product Containers

Is anyone familiar with this standard?

The description says "Containers... shall generally be designed in accordance with the philosophy and requirements of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code, Section VIII, Division 1..." I don't really want to bother with purchasing and reading PIP VESBI002 if it just follows ASME BPVC. I have ASME BPVC.

Specifically, I am interested in how PIP VESBI002 addresses "head pressure" (for lack of a better term) in bulk storage silos. Are solids just treated as liquids, or is there a better method of determining the loads on "pressure barriers" at a given depth in the bulk solid material?

Any other insights or other resources to determine these design inputs would also be appreciated.

RE: PIP VESBI002

After quickly skimming it doesn't really seem to say. It basically just says specify maximum pressures based on stored material and other factors.

PIP vessel/equipment specs are mostly contract language type stuff. I'm sure there's others but most are just specifications for the contract that say the vendor has to meet xyz criteria and follow all these different things. They aren't guides on how to determine what features/accessories should/shouldn't include in your spec if that makes sense.

RE: PIP VESBI002

Bulk storage silos cannot be designed to ASME Section VIII. Bulk solids act completely different from the gases and liquids implicit in the ASME rules.

I'm not aware of Standard or Code that governs silo design. There are various papers and commonly accepted design methodologies. However, each design is unique to the material being stored (density, angles of internal friction, etc), silo material (allowable stress, wall sliding friction, etc) along with special problems like eccentric loading or withdrawal.

If you are not already familiar with silo design I suggest hiring a contractor that is.

RE: PIP VESBI002

Geoff ..

You are correct ...There is no single national code or standard in the USA that specifically covers the design of silos for the storage of bulk solid materials. For this reason, the design of these vessels will vary from place to place and company to company, and is often a topic of engineering debate.

But, bulk storage components have been designed by established structural methodologies for many, many decades. This document provides a good description of rules, methods and loading conditions:

https://www.ijsdr.org/papers/IJSDR1905019.pdf

ENG-TIPS has addressed this issue before:

https://www.eng-tips.com/viewthread.cfm?qid=283556
https://www.eng-tips.com/viewthread.cfm?qid=472897

Also, good background information here:

https://www.powderbulksolids.com/storage/building-...

MJCronin
Sr. Process Engineer

RE: PIP VESBI002

Quote (FoxRox

Specifically, I am interested in how PIP VESBI002 addresses "head pressure" (for lack of a better term) in bulk storage silos. Are solids just treated as liquids, or is there a better method of determining the loads on "pressure barriers" at a given depth in the bulk solid material?

Any other insights or other resources to determine these design inputs would also be appreciated.)


I am not sure for the term "head pressure" , but i just guess, it is lateral pressure against the shell of silo ..

My points are ,

- The lateral and vertical pressure of the granular materials is a function of internal friction angle and friction btw material and silo wall ..

- Janssen method is used to calculate the pressures and you may look SOIL MECHANICS books to get the concept or ACI 313.


- Eurocodes have a separate specification.( EN 1993-4-1 Eurocode 3: Design of steel
structures - Part 4-1: Silos ) . Since this is code at Eurozone , you may download free of charge.

- You may provide more detail to get specific respond .









I cannot give you the formula for success, but I can give you the formula for failure..It is: Try to please everybody.

RE: PIP VESBI002

Quote (MJCronin)

bulk storage components have been designed by established structural methodologies for many, many decades.

To this point, the PIP "standards" were drafted with no manufacturers present in the conversation. So always be aware of the possibility that there is a major gap between the PIP specification and actual industry practice. I have no experience with this standard, but I do have significant experience with a different PIP spec where the details are miles apart from normal market practices. Other PIP specs align tightly with an existing offering (the LV motor spec can usually be fulfilled by IEEE 841 for example)

RE: PIP VESBI002

(OP)
I appreciate the replies from everyone. Lots of good info. I'll be looking into the resources mentioned and not wasting my time with the PIP standard.

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