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ASME Air Reciever Piping Requirements
2

ASME Air Reciever Piping Requirements

ASME Air Reciever Piping Requirements

(OP)
Hello All,

I am adding an edit to this post to clarify what I am looking for - I am after the actual ASME Code section that calls out or mandates the need for schedule 80 pipe from the tank to the first valve, that is all, if there is NO ASME code section call out, so be it, if there is please let me know what it is?

I entirely understand the CA code section, and that it requires the use and installation of schedule 80, not disputing that fact or trying to get around it, simply looking to see if ASME B31.1 or B31.3 calls for the same in any of its code sections?


I am hoping that you all can help me find a Specific ASME code section, that is referenced in another code section.

What I have is a Cal/OSHA code section (Labor Code 7620-7771):

The pressure vessel unit is responsible under Labor Code sections 7620-7771 for the inspection of boilers (any fired or unfired pressure vessel used to generate steam pressure by the application of heat), and tanks (any fired or unfired pressure vessel used for the storage of air pressure or liquefied petroleum gases).

Permits are required for air tanks, LPG propane storage tanks over 125 gallons, and high pressure boilers over 15 psig steam. Permit exceptions depend on vessel capacity and operating pressures. Permit inspections may be performed by a Pressure Vessel Unit inspector or an inspector employed by an qualified insurance company. Schedule an inspection with the nearest pressure vessel office or contact your insurer to see if they provide this inspection service. The complete regulations are contained in Title 8 regulations, sections 450-560 and sections 750-797.


Per this code section it requires the following:

§462. Field Inspections and Reports.
(m)(1) Air piping shall be in accordance with ANSI/ASME B31.1 or B31.3.
(2) All piping from the tank to the first shut-off valve shall be Schedule 80 metallic pipe.


I am looking to find in any of the ASME Code books where it calls out the referenced need for Schedule 80 piping from the tank to the first valve?

I have looked through B31.1, B31.3, Section I BPVC, Section VIII Div 1 - 2 Pressure Vessel Const., even BPE... and can not find any reference to this as called out in the above.

Has anyone seen this in ASME anywhere, I am trying to verify this is an actual ASME code section?

Here is a link to the actual code Cal/OSHA section:

https://www.dir.ca.gov/dosh/pressure.html

https://www.dir.ca.gov/dosh/pressure.html

Thanks in advance for any help on this!!!

RE: ASME Air Reciever Piping Requirements

It's irrelevant.

You need to do what the calefornia code says to comply.

It could easily say it wants you to paint the air pipe pink with gold spots and that's what you need to do to comply.

The ref to B31.1 and 31.3 refers to all the other elements of design and materials. You won't find any requirement for s particular thickness.

Remember - More details = better answers
Also: If you get a response it's polite to respond to it.

RE: ASME Air Reciever Piping Requirements

While some sections of the Code have min wall thicknesses in them this is a different matter.
CA says use sch80 to the first shutoff.
Therefore, you must use sch80 to the first shutoff.

= = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = =
P.E. Metallurgy, consulting work welcomed

RE: ASME Air Reciever Piping Requirements

The two posts above have it right, governing code is governing code, but if you are interested in the why:

ASME B31.3 2020 Table 314.2.1 gives minimum wall thickness for threaded joints in normal fluid service using 'notch sensitive' material(e.g. carbon steel) as Sch. 80 for 1-1/2" NPS and under. Air piping could be Category D possibly which doesn't have a stated minimum in this table.

BUT regardless of fluid service designation if you actually do the B31.3 wall thickness calculation out for a Grade B nipple with a "typical" (heavy air quotes) corrosion allowance of 1/16" or so and a 12.5% mill tolerance you will find that Sch. XS/80 is required by ASME B31.3 for small bore threaded pipe even at trivially small design pressures.

RE: ASME Air Reciever Piping Requirements

See ASME VIII Div 1 2021 Table UG-45 Nozzle Minimum Thickness Requiremets.

Regards

RE: ASME Air Reciever Piping Requirements

From your edit, AFAIK, there is no such code section.

Codes are not intended to be that specific. Think about it. The code writers have no idea about your pressure or service or size of pipe or strength of pipe so why would they come out with such a requirement??

Remember - More details = better answers
Also: If you get a response it's polite to respond to it.

RE: ASME Air Reciever Piping Requirements

No one has yet mentioned the endemic internal corrosion of air receivers and systems ...

Perhaps the CA requirements for Sch 80 pipe are to ensure sturdy, thick walled pipe that will not quickly corrode ?

MJCronin
Sr. Process Engineer

RE: ASME Air Reciever Piping Requirements

More info.
Process Industry Practices
Vessels

PIP VESV1002 May 2009
Vessel Fabrication Specification
ASME Code Section VIII, Divisions 1 and 2

5.9.2 Minimum nozzle neck thickness for carbon steel and low alloy steel nozzles
shall be per Code Paragraph UG-45 {4.5.4}, except in no case shall the
nominal thickness selected for nozzle necks up to and including NPS 3 (DN
80) be thinner than Sch 80.

Regards

RE: ASME Air Reciever Piping Requirements

Nozzles are not pipe.

Remember - More details = better answers
Also: If you get a response it's polite to respond to it.

RE: ASME Air Reciever Piping Requirements

The (OP)says
"I am adding an edit to this post to clarify what I am looking for - I am after the actual ASME Code section that calls out or mandates the need for schedule 80 pipe from the tank to the first valve, that is all, if there is NO ASME code section call out, so be it, if there is please let me know what it is?"

"from the tank to the first valve" IS A NOZZLE !!

Regards

RE: ASME Air Reciever Piping Requirements

Not necessarily. The valve does not need to be on the nozzle, but could be some distance away and the OP specifically mentioned "piping".

"Nozzles" tend to end with a flange very close to the vessel. The first isolating valve could be much further away.

But if you want to hang your hat on that section from ASME VIII then fair enough. It does say "minimum" thickness.

Remember - More details = better answers
Also: If you get a response it's polite to respond to it.

RE: ASME Air Reciever Piping Requirements

Quote (r6155)

"from the tank to the first valve" IS A NOZZLE !!

This is in reference to air piping, an air receiver tank nozzle is very possibly no more than a B16.11 half/full threaded coupling.

I think MJCronin is probably correct, CA is likely assuming the combination of threaded carbon steel pipe and wet air and forcing S/80 wall thickness to provide some level of corrosion allowance as well as ASME piping code compliance. So when the main piping system rots out you can at least shut off the supply from the tank.

RE: ASME Air Reciever Piping Requirements

Avoid threaded joint in corrosive service.
Regards

RE: ASME Air Reciever Piping Requirements

MJCronin, despite his advancing age, bad attitude and strong medications, is often correct ....

MJCronin
Sr. Process Engineer

RE: ASME Air Reciever Piping Requirements

It is certainly common for Engineering companies and Owners to require sch 80 for small bore piping generally under 4" diameter and I have seen a growing number of specs that require this including 4" diameter. Regardless, CA (jurisdiction) requirements supercede Code design requirements.

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