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Color combo spec

Color combo spec

Color combo spec

(OP)
I have AMS-STD-595.
But, I thought I saw a spec years ago that indicated which colors should with which, color combinations.
I'm curious is there a spec for this?
An example is we had someone anodize a part dark blue. They ink'd the part info in black. Difficult to read.
We are changing it to white.
I know we can call this out on the dwg, but I'm wunder'n if there is a spec.
Thanks.

ctopher, CSWP
SolidWorks '19
ctophers home
SolidWorks Legion

RE: Color combo spec

Seems familiar - it is likely to be in a human factors document section about labels which gives specific information about which colors to use rather than what-if guidance. The other question is - what if you wanted it to be tough to read? Not much use as camouflage if the lettering is bright and contrasty.

RE: Color combo spec

(OP)
We need it to be easy to read, even military customers want it easy to read.

ctopher, CSWP
SolidWorks '19
ctophers home
SolidWorks Legion

RE: Color combo spec

That explains the black letters on dark green uniforms? What I was getting at is there won't be an "always make it readable" specification and any other spec will be for particular colors for both lettering and background.

RE: Color combo spec

(OP)
Thanks. I thought I saw a spec once that indicated color combinations.

ctopher, CSWP
SolidWorks '19
ctophers home
SolidWorks Legion

RE: Color combo spec

ctopher,

I have never heard of AMS‑STD‑505. Is that the old FED‑STD‑595?

I have a lot of experience with this discussion. The AMS/FED‑STD‑595 is understood by paint shops, and you can purchase the colour chips. Paint shops also understand the RAL colour standard, and you can find colour samples with RGB values on the internet. The RGB values make your colours reproducible in SolidWorks. If you are doing silkscreen artwork, you need to understand Pantone colours. You can purchase colour samples from artist supply companies.

I don't know how to control anodize colours, or even if it is possible. Make all your aluminium parts out of the same aluminium grade. Send them all to the same anodizing shop. Don't plan on mixing parts from different batches.

Look up Web usability. There is a lot stuff on the internet on how to make your website readable, and lots of idiots who do not understand the importance of colour contrast. This top is covered on Web Pages That Suck. It is too bad Vincent Flanders is no longer maintaining his site.

--
JHG

RE: Color combo spec

(OP)
drawoh,
I meant the AMS/FED‑STD‑595.
Yes, anodizing colors can be controlled. Some anodize shops have a color palette to follow.
Majority of our parts are the same alum grade.
The materials and anodizing isn't the issue, it's the color scheme.

ctopher, CSWP
SolidWorks '19
ctophers home
SolidWorks Legion

RE: Color combo spec

ctopher,

Another thing you can do in SolidWorks is panel artwork. You can create the silkscreen film from the CAD model that you inserted on your part and assembly. You can test your colour scheme, the visibility of your text, and the general logic of how your complex panel is organised and labelled. You need to think through your procurement process and assembly organisation.

At some point, you have a CAD model of your artwork. Talk to your silkscreener on how they want register marks to locate to the actual part.

  1. Attach this to a drawing.
  2. Reset the model outline to a layer named something like "outline".
  3. Create a layer called something like "hatch", and make it distinctive colour like red.
  4. Fill in the outlines with solid hatches.
  5. Turn OFF layer "outline".
If you want to do two colours, you need two artworks, and an accurate, reliable way to register everything together. It will be a huge pain in the ass, just like it will be in manufacturing.

One other issue will be corporate logos. Corporations generally protect their logos, and they won't like your attempt at rendering them. If you can pull it off, all power to you. They may give you a copy of it that you can copy into SolidWorks. Failing all of that, you will have to keep logos off of panels with functional markings. Put the logo on something that does not have critical information. If the logo is on your critical panel, you may have to move components around to make room for it.

--
JHG

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