×
INTELLIGENT WORK FORUMS
FOR ENGINEERING PROFESSIONALS

Contact US

Log In

Come Join Us!

Are you an
Engineering professional?
Join Eng-Tips Forums!
  • Talk With Other Members
  • Be Notified Of Responses
    To Your Posts
  • Keyword Search
  • One-Click Access To Your
    Favorite Forums
  • Automated Signatures
    On Your Posts
  • Best Of All, It's Free!

*Eng-Tips's functionality depends on members receiving e-mail. By joining you are opting in to receive e-mail.

Posting Guidelines

Promoting, selling, recruiting, coursework and thesis posting is forbidden.

Students Click Here

Help Identifying Correct Classification of Haz Loc Electric Motor

Help Identifying Correct Classification of Haz Loc Electric Motor

Help Identifying Correct Classification of Haz Loc Electric Motor

(OP)
I need to replace an electric motor that is currently installed in a hazardous location (classified) area. The data plate reads as a Class1 Group D motor. The "division" designation is not on the data plate. Picture of motor and data plate is attached. Should I just assume DivI and just be done with this?

RE: Help Identifying Correct Classification of Haz Loc Electric Motor

Bill
--------------------
Ohm's law
Not just a good idea;
It's the LAW!

RE: Help Identifying Correct Classification of Haz Loc Electric Motor

Class 1 = vapors
Division 1 = always present
Division 2 = infrequently present.
Group D = Things like propane.

Either order a motor suitable for division 1 (conservative), or verify the area classification with the process engineer.

If this is one of the kinds of process plants for which specific NFPA guidance exists you should also consult that, for example:
  • NFPA 58 Liquefied Petroleum Gas Code
  • NFPA 59 - Utility LP-Gas Plant Code
  • NFPA 820 Standard for Fire Protection in Wastewater Treatment and Collection Facilities
  • etc.
List of NFPA Codes & Standards, no charge access is available

RE: Help Identifying Correct Classification of Haz Loc Electric Motor

Old motor nameplates, I believe, were Div 1 capable (going by memory, so double check me on that). However, as described previously, check w/ your process engineer to ensure Group D is still applicable. Often-times in the plant where I worked, process chemicals were changed routinely and motor specifications had to be carefully coordinated and at times, motors changed out to meet new process requirements.

The question(s) I'd ask is: "where is the motor being installed and is it near an equipment material opening, such as a process dryer outlet or the like?"

Mike

Mike

RE: Help Identifying Correct Classification of Haz Loc Electric Motor

I would assume Division 1. Per NEC, if the area is designated Class I, Div 2, ordinary squirrel-cage motors can be used. If the motor has commutators, sliding contacts, etc, it has to be listed for Div 1, even in Div 2 location. So it would be rare to see a motor labeled Class 1, Div 2.

But more importantly, someone has to decide on the proper classification for the area, regardless of what the existing motor is.

RE: Help Identifying Correct Classification of Haz Loc Electric Motor

Find it interesting both the Class and Group and even model numbers are all X'd out.

Keith Cress
kcress - http://www.flaminsystems.com

RE: Help Identifying Correct Classification of Haz Loc Electric Motor

'Rebuilt' tag have anything to do with the xxx'ing?

RE: Help Identifying Correct Classification of Haz Loc Electric Motor

There are two lines with class and group. Only the second line is crossed out, probably indicating that the motor is only rated for one class and group.

RE: Help Identifying Correct Classification of Haz Loc Electric Motor


Quote (UL)

Electric motor for hazardous
locations class 1 group D
No F xxxxxx
Caution to prevent ignition of
hazardous atmospheres this
motor should not be installed in
an area where vapors or gases
having an ignition temperature
less than 280 deg C are present

Best Regards A

“Logic will get you from A to Z; imagination will get you everywhere.“
Albert Einstein

Red Flag This Post

Please let us know here why this post is inappropriate. Reasons such as off-topic, duplicates, flames, illegal, vulgar, or students posting their homework.

Red Flag Submitted

Thank you for helping keep Eng-Tips Forums free from inappropriate posts.
The Eng-Tips staff will check this out and take appropriate action.

Reply To This Thread

Posting in the Eng-Tips forums is a member-only feature.

Click Here to join Eng-Tips and talk with other members! Already a Member? Login


Resources

Low-Volume Rapid Injection Molding With 3D Printed Molds
Learn methods and guidelines for using stereolithography (SLA) 3D printed molds in the injection molding process to lower costs and lead time. Discover how this hybrid manufacturing process enables on-demand mold fabrication to quickly produce small batches of thermoplastic parts. Download Now
Design for Additive Manufacturing (DfAM)
Examine how the principles of DfAM upend many of the long-standing rules around manufacturability - allowing engineers and designers to place a part’s function at the center of their design considerations. Download Now
Taking Control of Engineering Documents
This ebook covers tips for creating and managing workflows, security best practices and protection of intellectual property, Cloud vs. on-premise software solutions, CAD file management, compliance, and more. Download Now

Close Box

Join Eng-Tips® Today!

Join your peers on the Internet's largest technical engineering professional community.
It's easy to join and it's free.

Here's Why Members Love Eng-Tips Forums:

Register now while it's still free!

Already a member? Close this window and log in.

Join Us             Close