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Welding References
3

Welding References

Welding References

(OP)
Would any kind soul wish to recommend to a new mechanical engineer decent reference material for understanding the art of welding and how to specify welding on drawings. I have a copy of Machinery's Handbook already. Some specific info that I would like easy access to is:

1. What weld (i.e. fillet, j-grove, butt, etc.) would be good for "x" purpose.
2. Analysis of the strength of the weld (static and dynamic).
3. What info is required to completly specify a particular type of weld.
4. And just general info on welding techniques and processes.

I am mainly involved in structural type welding (mostly electronic equipment frames) and the most common type of material I use is steel, although aluminum is sometimes used. I never took a class on welding so I guess I need to know the basics and what the guys on the shop floor are expecting to see when I send them a drawing.

Thanks!
Grant

RE: Welding References

Hi Grant,

I have found that you can put all of the weld symbols that you want on a drawing but the only way to really listen and learn by talking to the welder or the shop(s)doing the work.

They will like that more then sending a drawing with a bunch of symbols on it. It doesn't hurt to develop a repore with the guys either your boss will like that also.

As far as symbology(if there is a word) I use ANSI Y14 and Global Engineering Standards. Mark's Standard Handbook for Mechanical Engineers is also a great reference for everything.

Good Luck!!

Mark (No relation to Mark's Handbook)

RE: Welding References

Grant,

I agree with Mark. There's nothing better than getting to know the guys in the shop. They can be great allies, you do however have to filter some of the information that you get from them.

As for welding information; there is an overwhelming amount of reading you can do, but a couple of sources I like that really cover the basics are:

"Design of Welded Structures", By Blodgett and
"The Procedure Handbook of Arc Welding" published by Lincoln Electric.

Good Luck,

Tom W.

RE: Welding References

Grant,
I could not agree more with TJW. I have used Blodgett's reference books since the early 70's. They are the best reference you could have on your desk for welding design, application and analysis. The "Design of Weldments" is a smaller verison of "Design of Welded Structures", and has been my welding bible for years. These books are still available from Lincoln Welding.

GEFought
jfought@invacare.com

RE: Welding References

Agree with TomW.

Lincoln Electric (phone 216-383-2240) is a good source.
AWS (www.aws.org) another place for publications.

Good luck.


RE: Welding References

Get a copy of the ANSI/AWS stnd A2.4 "Welding Symbols" and A3.0 "Welding Terms and Definitions". Welding symbols are intended to be very exact in their execution. Read and study them. They are actually a lot of fun. Remember the information location does not change with regard to which end the arrow comes from on the ref. line. The Lincoln book is an excellent pub. Talk to the shop fellows. As was said earlier "take it with a grain of salt". Lots of experts in this field! Good luck. Check out the AWS publications. If time permits take a night class in welding!

RE: Welding References

I agree withTJW and justajeepr. Blodgett's is not only a good reference but is priced right.

RE: Welding References

AWS has a series of welding handbooks. "Volume 1 - Welding Technology" is a good introduction reference. Lincoln Electric's "The Procedure Handbook of Arc Welding" contains many design application tables.

Lincoln Electric's "Solutions to Design of Weldments" (D810.17) is a good application source. It has "real world" examples of weld design.

RE: Welding References

If you want to calculate the life of the weld seam, you need to got to the next address: www.femfat.com
This is a very useful program to analyse the welds too. It is based on a Finite Element model.

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