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change a gym to a commercial warehouse
2

change a gym to a commercial warehouse

change a gym to a commercial warehouse

(OP)
Hi

Is it possible to change a gym into a industrial warehouse? the gym was originally built as a gym with a small warehouse for gym equipment, the slab thickness is 5" (3500psi). Is the building code of a gym similar to that of a commercial warehouse? there is no zoning problem.

Thanks

Michael

RE: change a gym to a commercial warehouse

You should check the original design live load, and compare that with the code specified warehouse floor live load and equipment load (if any). Note that depends on the situations (type of floor framing, structural layout...etc), the existing floor may also be modified for higher loading, if necessary. Is zoning ok?

RE: change a gym to a commercial warehouse

A 5" slab is pretty thin for a commercial warehouse... if lightly loaded it might suffice... normally general purpose warehouses have slabs approx 8" thick...

Rather than think climate change and the corona virus as science, think of it as the wrath of God. Feel any better?
-Dik

RE: change a gym to a commercial warehouse

Quote (Is zoning ok?)


That's a good point... the change in Use and Occupancy runs the gamut... zoning, fire resistance, handicapped access, etc.

Rather than think climate change and the corona virus as science, think of it as the wrath of God. Feel any better?
-Dik

RE: change a gym to a commercial warehouse

What type of structure do you have; a single story frame? If that's the case the wind, rain, & snow loadings don't change whether it's a gym or a warehouse. If there's an interior mezzanine you'll have to analyze the floor system. In NYC gyms are designed for 100 psf; back in 1900 it was 50.

My parish is converting a 110'x100 foot gym into a church; single story PEMB (gable frames) circa 1960. According to the engineer, the frame can't support the A/C duct work or the proposed ceiling. Something to consider, if you're going to hang anything from the roof framing.

RE: change a gym to a commercial warehouse

Michael:

Other than the floor loading concerns alluded to by others I don't think the building code issues will be very significant. However, I would prepare a sketch and have a meeting with the local building official to see what concerns they will have. Since this is a change of use the code often requires upgrades to current requirements. We would also ask them to visit the site to determine if any deficiencies exist that will need remediation.

Second, fire protection may be your biggest headache. I would contact the local fire protection company that services the building (assuming the facility has sprinklers). Again, a sketch of the proposed plan showing proposed racking locations, heights, and detailed information on the type and quantity of goods being stored will help them understand the scope of any changes/additions that will need to be made. The nature of goods being stored can have a huge effect on the fire protection system design.

Regards,

DB

RE: change a gym to a commercial warehouse

Is the zoning appropriate for a warehouse? Gyms are often located in or adjacent to residential areas, while warehouses are normally in industrial areas. Other than the permitted uses, the floor (as others have said) would be the main issue, as a 5" slab is light for any forklifts, etc. which are required.

RE: change a gym to a commercial warehouse

(OP)
Hi

Thank you all for your input. The gym has no zoning problem. My big concern is the 5" slab, it is fiber enforced, no rebar, no steel wire mesh, can this kind of floor be used for warehouse? do I need to have a core test? is there a way to modify and improve the existing slab with no rebar and wire mesh?

Thanks

Michael

RE: change a gym to a commercial warehouse

Michael- is the 5" slab you are asking about a slab on grade for a 1 story building or an elevated structural slab (at a mezzanine/2nd story)?

I'm going to assume it's a 1 story building with a 5" slab on grade. The capacity of slabs on grade depends on the quality of the subgrade beneath the slab as much as the strength of the slab itself. Are there any record drawings available?

You'll also want to understand what kind of equipment (forklifts, etc.) would be used on the slab and determine maximum wheel loads. You'll also want to understand what sort of storage racks/etc may need to be anchored to the slab. 5" doesn't give a whole lot of room to anchor equipment or storage racks if you're in a seismic area.

Here's some background info if it is a slab on grade: https://www.structuremag.org/wp-content/uploads/20...

I recommend you hire a structural engineer to help you with this.

RE: change a gym to a commercial warehouse

(OP)
Thanks. one more question, there are a number of pits on the floor, the size of the largest one is about 20feet by 20 feet and 6feet deep, we are planning to refill these pits with gravel and concrete, will these pits be a problem for changing a gym to a warehouse?

RE: change a gym to a commercial warehouse

You need the advice from a geotechnical engineer to properly take care of the pits.

RE: change a gym to a commercial warehouse

Quote (You need the advice from a geotechnical engineer to properly take care of the pits.)


I've often filled them with compacted granular and put a concrete slab over... most soils are loaded to a thousand or more psf... and the slab may be loaded to a few hundred...

Rather than think climate change and the corona virus as science, think of it as the wrath of God. Feel any better?

-Dik

RE: change a gym to a commercial warehouse

It sounds like all you are really worried about is the slab on grade.

A warehouse can have all sorts of different type of loading on the slab. The two types of loads which seem often to control are wheel loads from fork trucks and post loads from storage racks.

A 5” slab is pretty thin for this application. It all depends on the quality of the base and sub base materials and the quality of the concrete. Unfortunately these are not “knowns”.

In this case, the engineer should go to the Owner and lay out the facts. The Owner can judge the cost of a new slab against the risk of leaving the old slab in place. If it were my money, I’d leave the old slab in place and see how it performed. Unless your loads are high, it will probably be OK.

As others have pointed out, there are concerns other than structural. Warehouses can have sprinkler requirements over and above what is currently in place. If there are hazardous materials, that needs to be looked at. Even if the materials are not hazardous, things like wood pallets and plastic packing materials can be problematic.

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