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Ages defect LOF in weld

Ages defect LOF in weld

Ages defect LOF in weld

(OP)
Dear all, need to get second opinion. I have an issue where we found out a high number of welds having Lack of Side Fusion and have been there since 5 years ago, a poor QC contribute to this.Currently we plan to re - inspect back using UT scan and also RT since we only can repair it next year.

Is there any other way we can manage the risk? Could engineering composite wrapping apply to the welds as mitigation while waiting to be repair next year? Appreciate any advise or experience about this.

RE: Ages defect LOF in weld

I have no idea how to answer this; you will need to clarify your question (or rather many questions).
Retaining a welding engineer would perhaps be a better starting point than this forum.

"Everyone is entitled to their own opinions, but they are not entitled to their own facts."

RE: Ages defect LOF in weld

Dear MadieKerang,

How did 'exactly' those LOFs were found out ?

Suppose those were not noticed, then what could have happened? A leak? How severe?

Since you were quite comfortable with those since last 5 years, don't panic now.

Carry out RT, do proper review and go for repair next year.

Regards.

DHURJATI SEN
Kolkata, India

RE: Ages defect LOF in weld

Quote:

Since you were quite comfortable with those since last 5 years, don't panic now.

I agree with this point. Without any information of what this pipe material is, size, service...

All you can do at this point is monitor with diligence and make good decisions based on the information you gather.

The devil is in the details; she also wears prada.

RE: Ages defect LOF in weld

Is Adib CJ your colleague asking the same question in Pipelines and Piping https://www.eng-tips.com/viewthread.cfm?qid=462485 ? You have to assess whether you have an immediate problem given the defect sizes, or whether, over the course of the coming year, degradation that may take the defects critical can occur.

Steve Jones
Corrosion Management Consultant

www.linkedin.com/in/drstevejones

All answers are personal opinions only and are in no way connected with any employer.

RE: Ages defect LOF in weld

(OP)
Thanks all...i will do the analysis again to more detail.

TQVM Mr Sjones...no idea who is adibcj hehehe

RE: Ages defect LOF in weld

Quote (ironic metallurgist)

Retaining a welding engineer would perhaps be a better starting point than this forum.

You tolerated this for 5 years? That reinforces my advice.

"Everyone is entitled to their own opinions, but they are not entitled to their own facts."

RE: Ages defect LOF in weld

How did you discover the lack of fusion?

Were the welds done using Gas metal arc welding (GMAW), also known as metal inert gas (MIG) welding and probably a few other names ?

===============

"Could engineering composite wrapping apply to the welds as mitigation . "

Without knowing the loads on the welded joints, the thickness of the joined components and the joint arrangement, my hunch is even a quite thick heavy carbon fiber epoxy wrap would do little. Things like differences in "E" ( modulus of elasticity) and load transfer would make the composite cast just go along for the ride, instead of actually taking the load off the weld and welded components.

The prep required for epoxy to make a substantial repair cast would be substantial. Maybe as much work as excavating the bad welds, until NDE is free of indications, and re-welding with a better controlled process.

I suddenly started visualizing a two piece clam shell formed ( steel?) enclosing the suspect joints and welded in place. Similar to the steel stampings (?) used to make Schwinn bicycles' steering heads once upon a time.

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