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Locking of the agitator in the sulphate production furnace by hardening of material

Locking of the agitator in the sulphate production furnace by hardening of material

Locking of the agitator in the sulphate production furnace by hardening of material

(OP)
Dear Members

I am having serious problems with material hardening inside the sulphate production furnace by the Mannheim process.

The production is being hampered by the fact that we have to stop the oven often to unlock the stirrer.

We believe that temperatures above 580 ° C favor the formation of hard "balls" and hardening of sodium sulfate / sodium chloride by locking the stirrer.

Has anyone had any experience like this or can you tell me which way to go to solve this problem?

Some inert material that I can add to the reaction to avoid hardening.

I thank the attention.

Leonardo Brandao
Process Engineer

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