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two story townhouse

two story townhouse

two story townhouse

(OP)
what is the normal and typical connection detail for the second level floor truss with the perimeter load bearing masonry wall?

this building is in South Florida.

Thank you for your discussion.

V2

RE: two story townhouse

(OP)
Please note that the floor trusses are wood.
thanks

V2

RE: two story townhouse

Typically staps are imbedded into the top bond beam for truss loads, beams use higher load buckets.  

Note the truss tails must have a metal bearing plate at the wall.

RE: two story townhouse

(OP)
is it practical to use a steel shelf angle to support the wood floor trusses at their bottom chord? the shelf would be say L3.5X3.5X3/8 with an expansion anchor bolts at some spacing, into the side ot the intermediate concrete
tie beam.

Thank you for your experienced thoughts.

V2

RE: two story townhouse

We would normally do a masonry corbel.. i.e. and 8" block, then 10", then 12" (all grouted solid) and then bolt a 2x4 nailer to the top of the 12" block.  For the second floor continue your 8" block on top of the 12" corbel.  You will want to use a top chord bearing trusses and hopefully they will be deep enough to to hide the corbel inside the floor system.  Make sure you check the wall for the eccentric load the floor system will put on the wall.

RE: two story townhouse

At the roof (assuming similar wooden trusses) make sure you have enough anchorage to prevent uplift.  Check Florida codes on this one.  

Where I live, one 8" layer of blocks is not enough, so anchor bolts are made to be embedded 12" and the bond beam is made to be at least 16" in depth.

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