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'Green' length on a pipe

'Green' length on a pipe

'Green' length on a pipe

(OP)
Hello!

This is just a general question rather than a problem or issue I'm having.

We had a discussion in the office yesterday and the term 'green length' was being used over and over again. We are calling off pipe lengths on drawings and we need to include some extra length, which is being termed as green length.

.....the question is, why is it known as green length??

Like I said, its a very trivial question, but I just don't know why its known as green!

thanks

Craig

RE: 'Green' length on a pipe

Found this document and it speaks of "green lengths", too. Perhaps an industry standard for labeling or marking pipes? Maybe those that were cut exceeding maximum lengths? *shrug* Why green? Maybe Red was taken?
Cheers,
g.

gbangs
TC 8.3.3
NX 8.5.3.3 MP11

RE: 'Green' length on a pipe

My best guess is that this relates originally to wood where a "green" timber length (i.e. Newly cut wood) is only approximate because it will then shrink as it dries out and is then cut to final length once that has happened.

Nothing to back this up but is plausible to me....

Remember - More details = better answers
Also: If you get a response it's polite to respond to it.

RE: 'Green' length on a pipe

@LittleInch Agree. Makes a little bit of sense with the connection between "green" and "length", but I find it a harder connection between "wood" and "pipes". Perhaps as you say, this term is to allow for shrinkage, as in; are these pipes going to require bending? and need to allow for minimum bend radii? Might cause a pipe to shrink from its overall length? Very plausible, then. Still... wood -> pipe? ;)
g.

gbangs
TC 8.3.3
NX 8.5.3.3 MP11

RE: 'Green' length on a pipe

I agree it's a bit of a stretch, but a green length to me is an approximate length which allows for some small adjustment based on site measured actual distances, especially when you have a number of items welded fitting to fitting.

If you were building a structure you would have a similar room for adjustment on certain members.

I'm open to other derivations of the term

Remember - More details = better answers
Also: If you get a response it's polite to respond to it.

RE: 'Green' length on a pipe

True. Just never heard the term green used for "...similar room for adjustment.." in my field of work or in my neck of the woods (sorry). Was always (and only) in terms of green lumber. Interesting, very interesting. Thanks for the knock on the head, OP, LittleInch!
g.

gbangs
TC 8.3.3
NX 8.5.3.3 MP11

RE: 'Green' length on a pipe

Never heard this term used, and suggest it is so meaningless that it should not be used. "Field fit length" or "extra length" actually mean something.

RE: 'Green' length on a pipe

GBANGS :
connection between "wood" and "pipe" is possible : if You google "continuous stave wood pipe" You will find a lot of amazing docs (1850 - 1930 approx)

RE: 'Green' length on a pipe

(OP)
Thank you for your input! I have spoken to a few other guys and the whole idea of wood came up a few times, so maybe that could be it!

RE: 'Green' length on a pipe

Are you using bamboo pipe?

RE: 'Green' length on a pipe

My notion of a wood pipe... wink



different direction entirely..
@robyengIT: Very interesting! Quite! Thx!

gbangs
TC 8.3.3
NX 8.5.3.3 MP11

RE: 'Green' length on a pipe

Quote (LittleInch)

I agree it's a bit of a stretch

Nice pun!

Aren't fire hydrants referred to as "fire plugs" by folks on the US East Coast? http://www.firehydrant.org/info/hist-fp.html That's meaningless in today's steel and plastic world, but clearly it's a grandfathered in phrase. I've never heard of "green length" myself, but that's ok, and the wood reference seems to be sensible.

RE: 'Green' length on a pipe

When I heard the term "green length " it had nothing to do with length . It referred to to a joint of pipe to be heat-treated ( and threaded, etc ) to make an API casing/tubing grade. Some steel mills do not have heat-treat capability or API monogram , so they sell "green pipe" to others.

RE: 'Green' length on a pipe

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