×
INTELLIGENT WORK FORUMS
FOR ENGINEERING PROFESSIONALS

Contact US

Log In

Come Join Us!

Are you an
Engineering professional?
Join Eng-Tips Forums!
  • Talk With Other Members
  • Be Notified Of Responses
    To Your Posts
  • Keyword Search
  • One-Click Access To Your
    Favorite Forums
  • Automated Signatures
    On Your Posts
  • Best Of All, It's Free!

*Eng-Tips's functionality depends on members receiving e-mail. By joining you are opting in to receive e-mail.

Posting Guidelines

Promoting, selling, recruiting, coursework and thesis posting is forbidden.

Students Click Here

Stainless steel "full hard" but in a roll?

Stainless steel "full hard" but in a roll?

Stainless steel "full hard" but in a roll?

(OP)
Hi,

I need some stainless steel that is 0.2mm thick that doesn't deform. I have found some stainless 304 that is "full hard" but it comes in a roll so I'm thinking it must bend because it'll come in a can. I just don't know what I'm googling for any more. I thought "full hard" meant stainless would not bend? What do I need to buy? Is there a particular term such as low ductility that I need to look for? I basically need a sheet of 0.2mm stainless that won't deform without a lot of trying, it doesn't necessarily have to be 304. Thanks. Antknee.



http://www.amazon.com/dp/B0062FEZM6/ref%3dpe_175190_21431760_cs_sce_dp_1

 

RE: Stainless steel "full hard" but in a roll?

The stuff you speak of is sometimes known as "shim in a can"?

Google for flat shim stock.  Or go here:

http://www.mcmaster.com/#shim-stock/=g9vuhw

click on stainless steel on the left side, and scroll to bottom.

RE: Stainless steel "full hard" but in a roll?

The shim stock can be wound into a coil/roll, but it has not been bent, i.e. permanently deformed.  When it is unrolled/uncoiled, it will be flat and springy.  Full hard or spring temper material is what you want, and this should meet your requirements.

RE: Stainless steel "full hard" but in a roll?

TVP, I disagree.  I have a fair bit of both types on my R+D shelf.  The rolls have taken a permanent set.  Both materials are (or are sold as) "full hard" shim stock.  That's why I bought the flat stuff, for when I need something flat.

RE: Stainless steel "full hard" but in a roll?

(OP)
What I seem to be understanding is that even "flat full hard 0.2mm stainless 304" will be quite flexible. Is that correct?

I need 0.2mm stainless that will remain flat even when quite high force is applied. I would like it to be for example glass like and very resistant to flexing. I can't change the thickness.

I haven't considered spring stainless steel. I will go and google for it and also check the link given.

Thanks. Antknee.

RE: Stainless steel "full hard" but in a roll?

You can bend rock if you really want to.

But if it is in a roll - you might need the services of a "level line" - a series of rollers that will flatten it out.  Takes a good operator to do it right.

Most steel service centers can do this..

RE: Stainless steel "full hard" but in a roll?

"What I seem to be understanding is that even "flat full hard 0.2mm stainless 304" will be quite flexible. Is that correct?"

Yes.

RE: Stainless steel "full hard" but in a roll?

Of course it will.  How much it will flex is determined by it modulus of elasticity, it will be the same for annealed 1010 steel as for hard 304.
The strength only comes into play with how far you can flex it before it takes a set.

= = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = =
Plymouth Tube

RE: Stainless steel "full hard" but in a roll?

(OP)
I think I understand now. I need a stainless that is full hard and with a high strength. This does tend towards stainless spring steel. I think I was put off spring stainless because I assumed the word "spring" would indicate it was more flexible than say 304, when I wanted something that wouldn't flex much. Am I the only one who thinks the name is misleading? Are there other possibilities rather than spring stainless 302? Thanks. Antknee.

RE: Stainless steel "full hard" but in a roll?

Read Ed's reply carefully.

Hardness relates to yield strength, not stiffness.

RE: Stainless steel "full hard" but in a roll?

(OP)
That is very concise.

For my usage which grade of stainless would you recommend?

Thanks. Antknee.

RE: Stainless steel "full hard" but in a roll?

The one that you can get.
If you look in ASTM A666 you will see that the various SS grades have similar strength levels when hard rolled.
There is not a great difference between grades.

= = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = =
Plymouth Tube

RE: Stainless steel "full hard" but in a roll?

(OP)
Does anyone have a link to ASTM A666?

What is the best supplier of shim in Europe? The McMaster-Carr supplier is very good and I could use them, it'd be extra shipping though. Thanks. Ant.

RE: Stainless steel "full hard" but in a roll?

Generally - you have to pay for ASTM specs as they are copyrighted.  Not too expensive but they want their pint of blood....

I am sure there are a number of suppliers in Europe - get on Google or your equivalent of our "Yellow Pages"

Or just call a steel service center - they can help or direct you!!

RE: Stainless steel "full hard" but in a roll?

Antknee, 0.2 mm glass sheet will be more flexible than 0.2mm steel sheet. You are looking for unobtainium. You can corrugate thin sheets to make them stiffer in one direction.

RE: Stainless steel "full hard" but in a roll?

(OP)
0.2mm stainless that is as flexible as glass would suit me fine. I haven't until now found any, there simply aren't any decent U.K. shim suppliers, I phoned up a dozen suppliers in the weeks prior to this post and ive already been sent various shims. There probably are decent suppliers in Germany but I can't speak German. Thanks. Antknee.

RE: Stainless steel "full hard" but in a roll?

(OP)
I've got some SS316 that is full hard and in a flat sheet. It is too flexible for my purpose...

How much stronger is full hard SS302 likely to be? Or do I have to get some made especially "very very hard" for me?

Thanks,

Ant.

RE: Stainless steel "full hard" but in a roll?

The only way to make it flex less is to make it thicker.
How much it flexes has nothing to do with the strength/hardness.

= = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = =
Plymouth Tube

RE: Stainless steel "full hard" but in a roll?

(OP)
I've got muddled with my terminology, apologies. I need it to be harder so it doesn't deform so readily at 0.2mm thickness.

The stainless I have is Rockwell Hardness C40, am I going to be able to source SS that is say C80 off the shelf?

My thought is that it'd be easier to source SS302 at Rockwell hardness over 40 but I'm not sure.

Thanks,

Ant.

RE: Stainless steel "full hard" but in a roll?

(OP)
I asked McMaster Carr if they could supply stainless with a Rockwell hardness over 45 and they said because of the complexity of US export regulations they would not quote or supply new overseas clients. Export as many cars as you can but you can't export lumps of metal! I don't get that...

RE: Stainless steel "full hard" but in a roll?

AntKnee read the previous posts closer- if you want something less deformable and want 0.2 mm thickness without corrugations then you want something other than standard alloy 304  stainless steel- no matter what hardness condition.

According out of common alloys
http://www.engineeringtoolbox.com/young-modulus-d_773.html
 Cr-Mo steels Cr 5% - 9%
is the stiffest.  

RE: Stainless steel "full hard" but in a roll?

(OP)
That is an interesting comparison but it has to be 0.2mm stainless steel. I'm going to see if I can get some especially cold rolled for me, I've asked for a hardness of Rockwell C80-100 or 4,000N/mm2 from a couple of companies. I have a feeling I won't get any reply...

Who do you think could roll me some?

Thanks,

Ant.

RE: Stainless steel "full hard" but in a roll?

You are not going to get any steel in those hardness ranges.  You are up in the range of ceramics, getting close to diamond.

----------------------------------------

The Help for this program was created in Windows Help format, which depends on a feature that isn't included in this version of Windows.
 

RE: Stainless steel "full hard" but in a roll?

(OP)
I was wondering about that, I'll ask for something lower next time or perhaps ask what is the highest hardness they could get to in 0.2mm stainless. I know that 2000N/mm2 or Rockwell C50 are common for full hard, so there must be some more if I ask the right company, maybe i'll ask for 2500 or 3000 N/mm2 i'm not sure. Thanks, Ant.

Red Flag This Post

Please let us know here why this post is inappropriate. Reasons such as off-topic, duplicates, flames, illegal, vulgar, or students posting their homework.

Red Flag Submitted

Thank you for helping keep Eng-Tips Forums free from inappropriate posts.
The Eng-Tips staff will check this out and take appropriate action.

Reply To This Thread

Posting in the Eng-Tips forums is a member-only feature.

Click Here to join Eng-Tips and talk with other members! Already a Member? Login


Resources

Low-Volume Rapid Injection Molding With 3D Printed Molds
Learn methods and guidelines for using stereolithography (SLA) 3D printed molds in the injection molding process to lower costs and lead time. Discover how this hybrid manufacturing process enables on-demand mold fabrication to quickly produce small batches of thermoplastic parts. Download Now
Design for Additive Manufacturing (DfAM)
Examine how the principles of DfAM upend many of the long-standing rules around manufacturability - allowing engineers and designers to place a part’s function at the center of their design considerations. Download Now
Taking Control of Engineering Documents
This ebook covers tips for creating and managing workflows, security best practices and protection of intellectual property, Cloud vs. on-premise software solutions, CAD file management, compliance, and more. Download Now

Close Box

Join Eng-Tips® Today!

Join your peers on the Internet's largest technical engineering professional community.
It's easy to join and it's free.

Here's Why Members Love Eng-Tips Forums:

Register now while it's still free!

Already a member? Close this window and log in.

Join Us             Close