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Any differences between the BSEE and BEEE?
2

Any differences between the BSEE and BEEE?

Any differences between the BSEE and BEEE?

(OP)
I am probably going to enroll in a Bachelor of Engineering, Electrical Engineering program. I'm wondering if there is any distinction between this degree and the more common BSEE. I'm under the impression that they are fairly interchangeable. Am I right?

RE: Any differences between the BSEE and BEEE?

(OP)
USA... More specifically, Youngstown State University in Ohio.

RE: Any differences between the BSEE and BEEE?

My assumption is they are interchangeable. I did a Google search. There is BSEE and BEE.

Chris
SolidWorks 08, CATIA V5
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RE: Any differences between the BSEE and BEEE?

Check the ABET accreditation.  You will regret spending 4+ years to get a degree that's not accredited.

RE: Any differences between the BSEE and BEEE?

I have the BEME and the difference is that you will take more engineering classes than a BS student would.  Some times the four years will spill into the fifth year because of the load.

Good luck!


 

Tobalcane
"If you avoid failure, you also avoid success."  

RE: Any differences between the BSEE and BEEE?

2
I went to YSU for the BEEE & MSEE.

The BEEE is a little more course work than a BSEE.  In the 70's, it was about 12-15 hrs. of more courses, when the quarter schedule was in place.  On the trimester system, it would be 8-10 additional hours.  So, the BEEE is slightly stronger than the BSEE, but the difference is not much at all.

Claude

RE: Any differences between the BSEE and BEEE?

(OP)
Thanks guys. I now know the difference. Cabraham, what did you think of youngstown... I know it was quite a few years ago that you went. But is it a decent college in your opinion?

RE: Any differences between the BSEE and BEEE?

It was a very good curriculum then, & I understand that it still is.  Only now there is no MS program, so you'll have to go elsewhere for the masters degree.  But the basic education is great.

Claude

RE: Any differences between the BSEE and BEEE?

Sorry to bump this thread but it is my understanding that they are totally different degrees, and depending on your choice can greatly affect your career path.

From my xp the BS had a lot more math and science and most of the classes were calc based.  The BE at our school was more or less a 2+2 degree.  It is possible that they had more engineering course work since you don't have the additional math and science.  But since it was not calc based did not hold much water if straight up engineering was your goal.

A good friend of mine was flat out told to stop persuing his BEEE as it would not allow him to move into an engineering role (he was a tech at the time).

Other coworkers of mine have greatly regretted not going the BS route.

If you want to be a tech (testing, building, hands on) I would not see an issue with either degree.  But you could be shooting yourself in the foot if you want to design and crunch numbers all day.

Besides, I rarely, if ever, see an add for a BE degree.  It's BS or nothing.

Since I had an associate degree already I could have gotten my BE in 3 years going to school at night.  Working in engineering already I could almost hear the engineers I worked for "he is not a real engineer".  I don't feel the same way but this field certainly does.  So I actually opted for the BS which took me 7 ;)
 

RE: Any differences between the BSEE and BEEE?

To "cksh", you seem to have the BEEE degree mixed up with the BSEET degree.

The "2+2" curriculum is for the BSEET degree.  The BEEE is a 4-4.5 year curriculum.  Then an MS is the next step w/o the need for any make-up courses.

A BEEE is slightly stronger than a BSEE, but the difference is pretty slim.  Either the BSEE or BEEE is a full engineering degree, which directly goes straight into grad school for the MSEE.

The 2+2 program starts with an AASEET for 2 years.  Then 2 more years results in the BSEET.  To go further requires courses in a full EE curriculum.

The reason job descriptions specifically call for a BSEE instead of BEEE, is because the BSEE is the more common curriculum.  If a job requires a BSEE at minimum, the BEEE slightly exceeds the requirement.  Hoever, a BSEET is considerably less, since the math & science in the BSEET program is much less intense.

If you already have an AASEET (associate's degree), you have 2 options.  Continuing in the same curriculum for 2 more years will produce a BSEET, not a BEEE.  To get a BSEE or BEEE would require many more courses.  You would have to take the stronger physics, calculus, as well as thermodynamics, statics, dynamics, strength of materials, e/m fields, controls, etc.

I hope this clears things up.  BR.

Claude

RE: Any differences between the BSEE and BEEE?

I agree with cabraham's post.  Cksh, I think you have the technology degree confused with the engineering degree.  There are no hands on classes just all theritical classes using some heavyduty math.   

Tobalcane
"If you avoid failure, you also avoid success."  

RE: Any differences between the BSEE and BEEE?

I also agree with cabraham. B.Eng is certainly the most you can do at the undergraduate level. Even here in Canada. smile

Fe

RE: Any differences between the BSEE and BEEE?

Generally a BE has a class or two more of engineering design than a BS.  The difference between the two is slim and frequently the BE is confused as being a typo on a resume to those who are not aware of a Bachelors of Engineering.   

RE: Any differences between the BSEE and BEEE?

Yup, I get that some times.  I have found that with smaller companies get it confused, however, the larger companies know what the BE means because there are more of us working in the bigger companies.

Tobalcane
"If you avoid failure, you also avoid success."  

RE: Any differences between the BSEE and BEEE?

Sorry, I wasn't thinking globally.  I guess I should have said here in the US ;)  There may be degrees you are describing like that here but I imagine most universities stick with the BS nomenclature.   

Our BE degrees were watered down BSEE (I don't think they even offer it anymore).  We had an ET but that was different altogether (think it was an AS).  I only remember because I had considered the BE degrees but steered away when I saw the curriculum.  

Sorry for the confusion...I think I am still confused ;)  

Here in the US I would still go for the BS regardless of the curriculum but that is my xp ;)

RE: Any differences between the BSEE and BEEE?

.... to add here our B.Eng. programs are considered the most rigorous of all the programs in university. (including BS)

Fe

RE: Any differences between the BSEE and BEEE?

I'm currently working on my BE for EE in the US and it is considered to be a little more intense than a BS. Theoretically we are able to finish our BE and go straight into our masters without any course requirements and also we should be able to take the general engineer test after we get our degree without any additional courses. Some more specialized US tech schools will only offer a BE while you see BS more common with larger schools that have an Engineering school within the college or university. Both are hard regardless so pick your poison.

RE: Any differences between the BSEE and BEEE?

:+) I was refering here in the good ald USA too.  Check out City University of New York, City Colleg:
http://www.abet.org/schoolstateeac.asp.  I took the Mechanical Engineering BE program.

Tobalcane
"If you avoid failure, you also avoid success."  

RE: Any differences between the BSEE and BEEE?

Sorry I tried the link and it faild. if you go to the ABET.org and search for accredit engineering degrees in NY and then you will come accross City University of New York, City Colleg.   

Tobalcane
"If you avoid failure, you also avoid success."  

RE: Any differences between the BSEE and BEEE?

If you belielve in Wikipedia.

"In some cases, Bachelor of Engineering degrees are given to students who take engineering courses as a majority of their course load."


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bachelor_of_Engineering

Tobalcane
"If you avoid failure, you also avoid success."  

RE: Any differences between the BSEE and BEEE?

At Stevens Institute of Technology I believe we can only get a BE and you can't get a BS in any of the engineering fields.
Just click on any of the different fields of engineering and it'll show you all the classes required.
http://www.stevens.edu/sit/courses/

This also shows the different programs
http://www.stevens.edu/sit/admissions/academics/undergraduate_programs.cfm

Note that there may be classes like "engineering design" which is like a "introduction to engineering" except because we are applying for a BE, we need to take it every semester and its basically a 3 hour lab with a lecture sometimes. I think the BE just adds more classes to a BS program to make you more familiar with the engineering field and capable to take the General Engineer test.

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