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Woven fabric filter bags vs. cartridge collectors

Woven fabric filter bags vs. cartridge collectors

Woven fabric filter bags vs. cartridge collectors

(OP)
I've put out to bid a baghouse job for exhausting 6 mixers.  The dust being collected will be primarily corn starch and bentonite clay.  One of the bidders put in two separate bids: one for a woven filter unit and the other (much cheaper) for a cartridge collector type unit.  I would like to know if anyone here has experience with cartridge collectors and if there are any drawbacks to using one as opposed to woven filter bags.  Thanks in advance

RE: Woven fabric filter bags vs. cartridge collectors

I work in the filtration industry.  I can say that generally, a woven fabric will have less retention, meaning more junk will pass through, but the air flow will be well maintained. On the flip side, this means that the cartridge may clog earlier and may require a higher exhaust pressure.  From personal preference, I'd go with air quality.  The changeouts may be more frequent with a cartridge, but the performance should far outweigh the woven bag.  Also of note, woven fabric is generally a more expensive than nonwoven filter media.  This is do to production and process constraints at the manufacturer, not necessarily due to higher quality.  If you really want to see the diffence for yourselves, ask for a demonstration of both types by the bidder. Find out the quality of the filtered exhaust and compare the filter life and replacement costs.  Then decide which is best for your application.

ChemE, M.E. EIT
"The only constant in life is change." -Dan Andia; 1999, Chemical Engineering Progress

RE: Woven fabric filter bags vs. cartridge collectors

A couple things I forgot to add.  Bag filters have their benefits over cartridge filters.  Replacement can be cleaner.  With bag filters debris is collected in the inside.  The bag and all the debris is thrown away and easily replaced.  With cartridges the debris is usually embedded on one side of the cartridge.  This means it's not necessarily contained and can fall off during replacement. So some sweeping of dirt after replacement may be necessary.  There is a middle-road though.  See if you can get a bid on non-woven bag filters.  They can have a retention (nominal) as low as 1-2 microns, have the benefit of a bag filter, but have a greater performance than a woven fabric.  The cost should be somewhere slightly cheaper than the woven fabric as well.

ChemE, M.E. EIT
"The only constant in life is change." -Dan Andia; 1999, Chemical Engineering Progress

RE: Woven fabric filter bags vs. cartridge collectors

(OP)
I guess my main concern with the cartridge collector is the powder clay.  That stuff really likes to soak up water (the products are water based and there will be more than a negligible amount of water vapor contacting the filter) and I'm afraid it might gum up the pleats of a cartridge collection medium.  My employer also has a comfort level with the woven filter bags - am I way off base with my concerns over powder bentonite clay?

RE: Woven fabric filter bags vs. cartridge collectors

You may be right.  If you have bentonite and cornstarch aggregates at high humidity, you are less likely to have to worry about dry microparticles escaping the filter.  You may be able to get away with a more open filter in this case.  If you are dealing with a cartridge and you form a cake on one side, and especially if that cake is wet, you will see a significantly lower life than if those particles were dry.  So yes, this could be an issue.  A bag filter may be the best bet.  But again, consider a nonwoven bag.  They are generally cheaper and have better retention.

ChemE, M.E. EIT
"The only constant in life is change." -Dan Andia; 1999, Chemical Engineering Progress

RE: Woven fabric filter bags vs. cartridge collectors

(OP)
I misspoke earlier - we use felted filter bags (napped cotton sateen usually) in our baghouses.  Slightly off-topic, but I noticed that you have a BS in ChE and and your EIT.  I'm in the same boat as you, however my engineering experience is more on the mechanical side of things - namely pollution control projects like the one I just described.  I want to get my PE license, but I don't know if I'll be qualified for a PE in chemical since that's not my area of expertise anymore.  You seem to be in the same boat as well since you said you work in the filtration industry - are you working towards getting your PE as well?  If you'd rather take this discussion of the board, you can email me at luckydog8of8@yahoo.com - I would appreciate any feedback you could provide...

RE: Woven fabric filter bags vs. cartridge collectors

Aspearin1:

Noted your tag line and the reference.  This is an old Chinese proverb from over 3000 years ago.  Even Bruce Lee used it in his teachings.  Just thought you'd like to know.  

RE: Woven fabric filter bags vs. cartridge collectors

So I'll credit Bruce Lee.  That's much cooler.  Thanks!

ChemE, M.E. EIT
"The only constant in life is change." -Dan Andia; 1999, Chemical Engineering Progress

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