×
INTELLIGENT WORK FORUMS
FOR ENGINEERING PROFESSIONALS

Contact US

Log In

Come Join Us!

Are you an
Engineering professional?
Join Eng-Tips Forums!
  • Talk With Other Members
  • Be Notified Of Responses
    To Your Posts
  • Keyword Search
  • One-Click Access To Your
    Favorite Forums
  • Automated Signatures
    On Your Posts
  • Best Of All, It's Free!

*Eng-Tips's functionality depends on members receiving e-mail. By joining you are opting in to receive e-mail.

Posting Guidelines

Promoting, selling, recruiting, coursework and thesis posting is forbidden.

Students Click Here

Clarification on Camber

Clarification on Camber

Clarification on Camber

(OP)
I drew up three different unequal length A-arm suspension on CAD and attempted to find out the differences and how each one of them gains camber.  I write this post only because I wish to see if my observations were correct.
     I'm guessing that the changing camber is based upon the ratio between upper and lower A-arms and how they affect the length of the swing arm.  
     I'm guessing, after having graphed it, that since the graph of swing arm vs. degrees of suspension travel turns out to be a hyperbola that the eccentricity of the hyperbola for a given suspension is a good judgement on how much camber a suspension will ultimately gain and how broad in a sense the camber peak will be.
     I had to state from scratch on this one since my books are back in the states and I am currently overseas.  Any help in setting me on the right path would be greatly appreciated

RE: Clarification on Camber

I think you are ignoring the angle of the arms at the design position.

To be honest I can't really understand your terminology, I'm not sure that you can really describe a given camber curve as just a single figure, and I've not seen anyone attempt to do so before.

For a given lower arm length, assuming at design it starts parallel to the ground, then there are 4 unique properties of the upper arm to consider, all of which will affect the camber curve to some extent, so I would expect your results to need 4 numbers to quantify them. If you also want to change the lower arm then that adds another two parameters to the mix.

Cheers

Greg Locock

RE: Clarification on Camber

The only way I evaluate a suspension system is to use William C Mitchell's Racing by the Numbers software. It tells you what you want and much much more.

RE: Clarification on Camber

Give me your e-mail I realized a have a demo version of Racing by the Numbers if you want to try it.

RE: Clarification on Camber

Greg has a good point regarding the initial positions of the control arms.  Take a look at this table to clarify.



MarkEE,
I would also like to evaluate Racing by the numbers.  Could you place it somewhere so it can be downloaded?

Thanks,

Joest

RE: Clarification on Camber

Joest,

I have a Zip file 940 KB it is a dos based program. I can attach it to an e-mail or if you have any other suggestions?

MarkEE

RE: Clarification on Camber

For anyone having trouble seeing the image I posted, it can be displayed by right clicking on the broken link icon and selecting "show picture".  I'm not sure why it doesn't load up automatically since it works perfectly when the url is accessed directly.  

MarkEE, I have no problem getting the file emailed to me.  Here is a link to my address.  

http://www.geocities.com/racecar543/email_link.doc

Cheers

Joest

RE: Clarification on Camber

Joest,
I tried accessing the above geocities link and received a this page is not viewable. Let me know and I'll send it.

MarkEE

RE: Clarification on Camber

I'm not sure what the problem is with the link.  When the address is copied and pasted into a browser it opens.  The same is happening with the image file I linked to.  Geocities must have some very shady service.  My email is also accessible by going to the FAQ section for this forum and opening the one I have posted.  The email address is at the beginning of the post.  After you get the address I will edit the post and remove the address.  Sorry about the hassle.  Thanks.

-Joest

RE: Clarification on Camber

geocities don't allow external referencing of images on their site.

therefore in order to see it we have to visit the geocities site directly.

The easiest way to do that is to right click on the red cross,look at properties, copy the address shown into 'open link' and bob's your uncle.

Nice diagram by the way, but there is a mistake in the third one down, the camber curve is inverted.

Cheers

Greg Locock

RE: Clarification on Camber

Sure enough Greg, the third one from the top is wrong.  Thanks for catching that.  I'll have to make an adjustment to it.

Joest

Red Flag This Post

Please let us know here why this post is inappropriate. Reasons such as off-topic, duplicates, flames, illegal, vulgar, or students posting their homework.

Red Flag Submitted

Thank you for helping keep Eng-Tips Forums free from inappropriate posts.
The Eng-Tips staff will check this out and take appropriate action.

Reply To This Thread

Posting in the Eng-Tips forums is a member-only feature.

Click Here to join Eng-Tips and talk with other members! Already a Member? Login


Resources

Low-Volume Rapid Injection Molding With 3D Printed Molds
Learn methods and guidelines for using stereolithography (SLA) 3D printed molds in the injection molding process to lower costs and lead time. Discover how this hybrid manufacturing process enables on-demand mold fabrication to quickly produce small batches of thermoplastic parts. Download Now
Design for Additive Manufacturing (DfAM)
Examine how the principles of DfAM upend many of the long-standing rules around manufacturability - allowing engineers and designers to place a part’s function at the center of their design considerations. Download Now
Taking Control of Engineering Documents
This ebook covers tips for creating and managing workflows, security best practices and protection of intellectual property, Cloud vs. on-premise software solutions, CAD file management, compliance, and more. Download Now

Close Box

Join Eng-Tips® Today!

Join your peers on the Internet's largest technical engineering professional community.
It's easy to join and it's free.

Here's Why Members Love Eng-Tips Forums:

Register now while it's still free!

Already a member? Close this window and log in.

Join Us             Close