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Name for an electrically controlled burst disk?

Name for an electrically controlled burst disk?

Name for an electrically controlled burst disk?

(OP)
Hello everyone,

I have been struggling to find the name for a component that is similar to a burst disk but instead of failing at a certain pressure, the disk can be remotely ruptured with an electrical signal. Another way to put is a valve that only actuates once and stays open position once actuated.

I have tried searched "remotely actuated burst disk", "electrically actuated burst disk", "signal controlled burst disk", etc to no avail so I am hoping you folks can point me in the right direction. Since this component might exist in fluid plants/control, I also asked this question on the fluid mechanics channel.

For those curious, the application is part of a a cyrogen safety system which allows a control system to trigger a vent and guarantee the vent remains open even in loss of power, loss of signal, etc. Basically, once the vent is triggered, the operator knows the state of the system regardless of what is happening elsewhere in the system.

Thanks everyone!

RE: Name for an electrically controlled burst disk?

I've never seen anything like that except for explosive bolts in aerospace. The function that you describe would typically be done with a piston or diaphragm valve. A squib placed on a standard rupture disc could work but then you have to deal with regulations regarding explosives.

RE: Name for an electrically controlled burst disk?

what's wrong with "electrically controlled burst disc" ?

this is meant to function (ie to burst) if external power is lost ? then "external power fail-safe disc" ?

"Hoffen wir mal, dass alles gut geht !"
General Paulus, Nov 1942, outside Stalingrad after the launch of Operation Uranus.

RE: Name for an electrically controlled burst disk?

I don't have experience in cryogenic applications but could you use a normally open solenoid valve or something similar that is only closed when energized?

RE: Name for an electrically controlled burst disk?

RE: Name for an electrically controlled burst disk?

It's a pyrotechnic valve you are looking for, not a burst disk.
Yes, the pyrotechnics fire a "squib" at a disk that is ruptured, releasing the flow.
Separate from that there may also be a burst disk, depending on the liquid in the container.

RE: Name for an electrically controlled burst disk?

(OP)
Hey everyone, thank you for the super fast responses!

Quote (IRstuff)

Google seems to be able to come up with is pyrotechnic valves
Never heard of a pyrotechnic valve and from some quick googling these could very possible be exactly what I am looking for. I am searching a solution with a small form factor (I probably should have mentioned that hahaha) and luckily these valves seem quite small. Thank you for the pointer!

Quote (Compositepro)

A squib placed on a standard rupture disc could work
An interesting idea! That would give likely the smallest form factor possible though I agree the regulations might be challenging. I wonder if a pyrotechnic valve also would have the same regulation restrictions? Regardless, I will ask around an see what the pyrotechnic valve companies and burst disk companies have to say about the idea and if (hopefully) there is a COTS variant. I will need to look into this further but my only fear would be compatibility risks between the medium I am venting and the explosive residue. Thank you for the idea, I will poke around and see what comes up!

Last comment, full disclosure I also posted this question on the Fluid Mechanics forum since I know they will have a different point of view and a great suggestion I have seen are actuated buckling pin devices. While they may not have the form factor I am looking for (to be determined), they definitely fulfill the roll to if anyone else is looking for answers. For my project, I could see swapping out the buckling pin for sep nut/explosive bolt to be a potential solution (shout out to Compositepro for that idea also).

Edited to have more detail and notes

RE: Name for an electrically controlled burst disk?

The only 'electrically-actuated burst disk' system like you are describing... that I'm aware of... works something like this...

Permanently installed metal disk... which is targeted-by a multi-blade-tipped penetrator that is sealed in the tube system. Penetration can be very slow or very rapid... and is irreversible. It likely is actuated by a electrical or a tiny 'squib' trigger releasing a coiled spring to drive the spear-tip into the disk. The necessity of bursting the disk with absolute confidence... and NO release of debris... and still having stable-fluid-flow is essential in space ops.

I am sure there is a company that specializes in these one-shot components.

I would assume that JPL probably has experience with this type valve for 'landers' propulsion/control propellant systems.

I know that Kidde designs/builds remote operated electrically actuated fire-suppression agent [Halon, etc] dispensing systems... using this concept. In this case one 'bottle' is plumbed for [1 or more] engines... and will dispense to the engine on fire by command-selection of the flight crew. A sealed 'penetrator system' is used in these designs.

Regards, Wil Taylor
o Trust - But Verify!
o For those who believe, no proof is required; for those who cannot believe, no proof is possible. [variation, Stuart Chase]
o Unfortunately, in science what You 'believe' is irrelevant. ["Orion", HBA forum]
o Only fools and charlatans know everything and understand everything." -Anton Chekhov

RE: Name for an electrically controlled burst disk?

Quote:

I am sure there is a company that specializes in these one-shot components.

I think you can contact the manufacturers already mentioned for better guidance.
Pacific Scientific... as IRStuff linked us to above.
And as WKTaylor mentioned... Kidde Aerospace, under the banner of UTC now.

Quote:

A squib placed on a standard rupture disc could work but then you have to deal with regulations regarding explosives.

Most aircraft have such squibs anyway. Mandatory fire extinguishers on engine compartments are the most common example. Class C cargo compartments also need such firex systems. Since 99.9% of transport category in service today have this level of protection, there's nothing special about it to the operator.

I don't think the OP has mentioned the fluid being contained/discharged yet, so saying anything more is just a guess. Clearly a squib like this is completely inappropriate for flammable substances. And drastic overkill for water.

RE: Name for an electrically controlled burst disk?

One can imagine rolling one's own, by using a conventional burst disk and a solenoid plunger to rupture the disk. The rating of the disk would have to be just beyond the normal pressure differential, and the solenoid plunger would initiate a catastrophic rupture of the disk.

TTFN (ta ta for now)
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