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Is Double Pipe Exchanger and Stacked Exchanger the same concept?

Is Double Pipe Exchanger and Stacked Exchanger the same concept?

Is Double Pipe Exchanger and Stacked Exchanger the same concept?

(OP)
PIP specifies that Bundle load shall not be considered for fin exchangers(double pipe exchangers).
Stacked exchanger look like 2 big pipes.
So I have above quiry.

RE: Is Double Pipe Exchanger and Stacked Exchanger the same concept?

Occasionally an internet search comes up with something useful.
https://www.ipcuk.com/types-of-heat-exchangers/

Typically, a "fin" exchanger will have fins attached to the outer pipe's outer surface to provide more surface for the exchange. This is not the same as a "simple" double wall construction, which has a cylindrical outer surface (i.e. just the pipe). Be sure you're comparing the correct items!

Converting energy to motion for more than half a century

RE: Is Double Pipe Exchanger and Stacked Exchanger the same concept?

If I understand your question correctly the answer is no, thermally speaking a hairpin heat exchanger is not quite the same as a set of stacked shell & tube heat exchangers. The reason is that a hairpin exchanger typically has a 100% countercurrent flow arrangement, so it's the most efficient arrangement possible.

A set of stacked shell & tube exchangers typically doesn't not have purely countercurrent flow. For mechanical reasons, such exchangers typically have two or more tube-side passes but only one shell-side pass, so typically they're only maybe 90% as efficient as a hairpin arrangement.


-Christine

RE: Is Double Pipe Exchanger and Stacked Exchanger the same concept?

With tube-in-tube exchangers (inner one finned or not) the surface area required is usually high enough that you end up with a stack of them to save floor space.
I have seen food pasteurizers that are a bank of 5 tubes high and two deep.
It takes that 200' for product to reach 185F for the required time.

= = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = =
P.E. Metallurgy, consulting work welcomed

RE: Is Double Pipe Exchanger and Stacked Exchanger the same concept?

(OP)

Is this double pipe heat exchanger or not? There are 2 pipes.

Quote (Christine74)

If I understand your question correctly the answer is no, thermally speaking a hairpin heat exchanger is not quite the same as a set of stacked shell & tube heat exchangers. The reason is that a hairpin exchanger typically has a 100% countercurrent flow arrangement, so it's the most efficient arrangement possible.

A set of stacked shell & tube exchangers typically doesn't not have purely countercurrent flow. For mechanical reasons, such exchangers typically have two or more tube-side passes but only one shell-side pass, so typically they're only maybe 90% as efficient as a hairpin arrangement.


-Christine

RE: Is Double Pipe Exchanger and Stacked Exchanger the same concept?

(OP)

Quote (Gr8blu)

Occasionally an internet search comes up with something useful.
https://www.ipcuk.com/types-of-heat-exchangers/
In this way, it is not a so-called double-pipe heat exchanger.

RE: Is Double Pipe Exchanger and Stacked Exchanger the same concept?

From your sketch you can see that there is an Inlet and an Outlet nozzle on each channel, so there's no way that those can be double-pipe heat exchangers. Those look like convention "stacked" shell and tube heat exchangers to me, possibly TEMA "BHM" fixed-tubesheet heat exchangers.


-Christine

RE: Is Double Pipe Exchanger and Stacked Exchanger the same concept?

Agree with Christine74: the diagram for the "STAAD Foundation Heat Exchanger Job" is two physically separate exchangers, each with their own inlet and outlet. The interior geometry of the individual exchangers is unknown (from the image)), but a reasonable assumption is that it is a conventional "stacked" shell-and-tube design.

Converting energy to motion for more than half a century

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