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regenerate electrolytic capacitors
2

regenerate electrolytic capacitors

regenerate electrolytic capacitors

(OP)
In electronic devices from the early 90s and early 2000s, turning on for 1 hour (60 minutes) is it enough to regenerate all the electrolytic capacitors?

RE: regenerate electrolytic capacitors

No. If the capacitors have deteriorated, they must be reformed before applying working voltage.
If the capacitors have deteriorated, applying working voltage may cause them to explode.
Search this site.
The question has been discussed and methods of regeneration have been presented.

--------------------
Ohm's law
Not just a good idea;
It's the LAW!

RE: regenerate electrolytic capacitors

(OP)
They are not deteriorated, they work normally inside the electronic device and the device is stored

RE: regenerate electrolytic capacitors

Was it stored energized? If no, the caps need to be reformed. Machines under warranty recommend reforming after 2 years of storage while de-energized. Obviously you can stretch this number some. Ideally, if you have a variac, you can apply a very low voltage initially and ramp it to rated voltage over 2 hours or so.

RE: regenerate electrolytic capacitors

(OP)
electrolytic capacitors in the electronic circuit inside the electronic device because desoldering all electrolytic capacitors to test is very complicated

RE: regenerate electrolytic capacitors

2
Electrolytic caps “de-form” as a result of time. This is not deforming as in being physically damaged, it has to do with an oxide layer that forms on the internal surfaces of the film that makes up the capacitor. That oxide is a necessary PART of the capacitor, but over time if the capacitor is not powered up periodically, the oxide dissolves back into the electrolyte. Then if you so much as apply full power to it, the film layers short and the capacitor is ruined.

So what waross was saying is that the “re-forming” procedure must be done PRIOR to fully energizing the system. Generally that involves applying a voltage that is approximately 10% of the rated voltage for a period of time, then slowly increasing the voltage over the course of hours, which slowly re-forms the oxide layers on the film. Whether or not the caps must be removed and isolated before doing this is a matter of the design of the device using them, so we can’t answer that for you. But generally designers that use electrolytic caps understand this may need to be done and make it somehow easy to do it.

It takes between 1 and 2 years for the oxides to dissolve back into the electrolyte, so if you want to prevent this all from happening, simply energize your devices for about 1-2 hours per year, that will maintain the oxide layer to a healthy level.


" We are all here on earth to help others; what on earth the others are here for I don't know." -- W. H. Auden

RE: regenerate electrolytic capacitors

Thanks Jeff.
I knew that but you explained it so much better.

--------------------
Ohm's law
Not just a good idea;
It's the LAW!

RE: regenerate electrolytic capacitors

(OP)
If I turn on all my electronic devices for 1 hour (60 minutes) every 6 months or every 1 year, is it enough or not to avoid problems with the electrolytic capacitors due to lack of use? 1 hour (60 minutes) regenerates all electrolytic capacitors)? I didn't find any electrochemistry forum for this question but I have new electronic devices, from the early 90s and early 2000s.

RE: regenerate electrolytic capacitors

If you power the device regularly you will not need to reform the capacitors.

If the capacitors do need to be reformed you will damage the device when you power it up.

RE: regenerate electrolytic capacitors

(OP)
power on electronic devices 1 hour (60 minutes) in 1 year is sufficient?

RE: regenerate electrolytic capacitors

Yes

RE: regenerate electrolytic capacitors

Quote:

I have new electronic devices, from the early 90s and early 2000s.

The way I'm reading what has been posted, if the "new" devices haven't been powered up for over two years, you will likely have cap issues if you just apply full voltage to them without taking other prior steps.

CR

"As iron sharpens iron, so one person sharpens another." [Proverbs 27:17, NIV]

RE: regenerate electrolytic capacitors

(OP)
I turn them on every 6 months for 1 hour but if it's possible to expand this interval ok

RE: regenerate electrolytic capacitors

2 years is the generally accepted interval.

RE: regenerate electrolytic capacitors

Quote:

I turn them on every 6 months for 1 hour

Are you saying you have already been doing this all along, or are you asking if that's what you need to do? If the first, sounds like you're good; if not, I refer you to my previous post . . .

CR

"As iron sharpens iron, so one person sharpens another." [Proverbs 27:17, NIV]

RE: regenerate electrolytic capacitors

(OP)
Does any electrochemical engineer have any explanation about the time needed to energize the electrolytic capacitors of electronic devices and avoid failures due to disuse?

RE: regenerate electrolytic capacitors

There are too many variables. Knowing the chemistry won't help predict the time the caps take to deteriorate.
Go ahead and energize once a year.
That will probably be OK.
If a device blows its caps when you energize, you may decide whether this was an outlier or if you should energize twice a year.
Free advice on the internet does not include nor does it imply a warranty of any kind.

--------------------
Ohm's law
Not just a good idea;
It's the LAW!

RE: regenerate electrolytic capacitors

(OP)
In my case, with used electrical devices from the early 90s and early 2000s, turn on all devices once a year for how many minutes or hours?

RE: regenerate electrolytic capacitors

Quote:

power on electronic devices 1 hour (60 minutes) in 1 year is sufficient?

IF the capacitors have REMAINED healthy by being energized for 1 hour every year or so, then yes.

If they were unpowered for MORE than a 2 year period at any stretch, then they should be reformed PRIOR to being fully energized.


" We are all here on earth to help others; what on earth the others are here for I don't know." -- W. H. Auden

RE: regenerate electrolytic capacitors

(OP)
2 years some new electrolitic capacitors and not soldered in circuit?

RE: regenerate electrolytic capacitors

Quote:

2 years some new electrolitic capacitors and not soldered in circuit?
Are you trying to deny the obvious?

--------------------
Ohm's law
Not just a good idea;
It's the LAW!

RE: regenerate electrolytic capacitors

The specific chemistry involved varies with manufacturers and size /ratings etc., so there is no “grand unifying formula” available for all capacitors. But the principals always remain the same. Here is a video that does a very decent job of explaining the concepts. I’ve been dealing with industrial VFDs and capacitor issues for 30+ years, I learned a couple of new bits of info from this.

https://youtu.be/Z-jKsVbKFqM?si=rpodDmwHF-7lCZ11


" We are all here on earth to help others; what on earth the others are here for I don't know." -- W. H. Auden

RE: regenerate electrolytic capacitors

(OP)
There really is a lot of variation among manufacturers, so I would have to look at the simplest and least reliable manufacturer and determine an interval to turn on all electronic devices that contain these electrolytic capacitors and for how many minutes or hours to energize these devices to completely reform the electrolytic caps.

electronic manufactured 90s years or 2000

RE: regenerate electrolytic capacitors

The least reliable makers produce capacitors that corrode and leak and cannot be reformed.

The next least reliable makers produce capacitors that corrode and leak more slowly and cannot be reformed.

The next least reliable makers produce capacitors that corrode and leak even more slowly and cannot be reformed.

The next least reliable makers produce capacitors that don't leak, but do dry out, and cannot be reformed.

The people who are concerned with keeping old capacitors cannot be reformed.

RE: regenerate electrolytic capacitors

(OP)
I can't open all my electronics power supplies because they are from different eras different manufacturers different types of electronics and check all the capacitors manufactures

RE: regenerate electrolytic capacitors

If you don't open all the power supplies and look you won't see the ones that leak corrosive materials and destroy the circuit boards they are soldered to. Then it won't matter what you did for the capacitors, which will leak whether they are reformed or not.

RE: regenerate electrolytic capacitors

(OP)
what best reccomendation all electrolytic capacitors in electronic devices turn on interval months or years and minutes or hours this devices?

RE: regenerate electrolytic capacitors

Unsolder them all and make a list of their properties so you can buy replacements to install when you want to use the parts. This will prevent leakage from destroying the circuit boards they are mounted in.

RE: regenerate electrolytic capacitors

(OP)
35.5C is within the limit for long-term storage of electrolytic capacitors?

RE: regenerate electrolytic capacitors

No. Electrolytic capacitors cannot be stored long term. Remove them from the assemblies and discard them.

RE: regenerate electrolytic capacitors

Machine learning takes time.

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