×
INTELLIGENT WORK FORUMS
FOR ENGINEERING PROFESSIONALS

Log In

Come Join Us!

Are you an
Engineering professional?
Join Eng-Tips Forums!
  • Talk With Other Members
  • Be Notified Of Responses
    To Your Posts
  • Keyword Search
  • One-Click Access To Your
    Favorite Forums
  • Automated Signatures
    On Your Posts
  • Best Of All, It's Free!

*Eng-Tips's functionality depends on members receiving e-mail. By joining you are opting in to receive e-mail.

Posting Guidelines

Promoting, selling, recruiting, coursework and thesis posting is forbidden.

Students Click Here

differences between 3D printing a part in metal and in polymer

differences between 3D printing a part in metal and in polymer

differences between 3D printing a part in metal and in polymer

(OP)
Hi,

I need to print a part by FDM (3D printing). The problem is that, where I work, we can only do it in polymers, like PLA. What are the practical considerations that are important for polymers that are not for metals, in terms of processing conditions and the expected material properties?

I thank you in advance,
Best regards,


Replies continue below

Recommended for you

RE: differences between 3D printing a part in metal and in polymer

I hope you don't have it in your head that printing metal vs polymer are in any way similar. There is no "metal" filament that you can put in your polymer printer.

The metal 3D printer that I have personal experience with was VERY expensive, and is several orders of magnitude more costly to operate than a standard printer.

Assuming you are ok with all of these factors....polymer and metal alike, I probly wouldn't trust them for anything very structural. The parts that I have messed with seem fairly strong but I wouldn't rely on these parts, for wear or strength properties, without doing extensive testing first.

RE: differences between 3D printing a part in metal and in polymer

Quote:

What are the practical considerations that are important for polymers that are not for metals, in terms of processing conditions and the expected material properties?

Plastic is generally wimpy, metal is generally not. Unless you can come up with more information, like what the part is intended to do and what performance needs to be achieved, you're not going to get actionable answers.

TTFN (ta ta for now)
I can do absolutely anything. I'm an expert! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BKorP55Aqvg
FAQ731-376: Eng-Tips.com Forum Policies forum1529: Translation Assistance for Engineers Entire Forum list http://www.eng-tips.com/forumlist.cfm

Red Flag This Post

Please let us know here why this post is inappropriate. Reasons such as off-topic, duplicates, flames, illegal, vulgar, or students posting their homework.

Red Flag Submitted

Thank you for helping keep Eng-Tips Forums free from inappropriate posts.
The Eng-Tips staff will check this out and take appropriate action.

Reply To This Thread

Posting in the Eng-Tips forums is a member-only feature.

Click Here to join Eng-Tips and talk with other members! Already a Member? Login



News


Close Box

Join Eng-Tips® Today!

Join your peers on the Internet's largest technical engineering professional community.
It's easy to join and it's free.

Here's Why Members Love Eng-Tips Forums:

Register now while it's still free!

Already a member? Close this window and log in.

Join Us             Close