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Is there a back to back channel fastening pattern?

Is there a back to back channel fastening pattern?

Is there a back to back channel fastening pattern?

(OP)
I know that there is a nailing pattering for built up wood beam. I'd like to know if there's a similar pattern/ standard for back to back channels to be used as beams.

RE: Is there a back to back channel fastening pattern?


Are you talking steel channels... if so, I use 1-1/2" long fillet welds spaced at 12" on the compression side and at 18" on the tension side...

-----*****-----
So strange to see the singularity approaching while the entire planet is rapidly turning into a hellscape. -John Coates

-Dik

RE: Is there a back to back channel fastening pattern?

(OP)
I'm using aluminum channel but I assumed that the connection would be same if not similar. I'm trying to avoid welding as I am building channel frames and then fastening them together in the field. I'm currently debating on weather I want to do two rows of fasteners when my channel is only 4" or do a staggered offset.

RE: Is there a back to back channel fastening pattern?

you definitely don't want to weld it if it's aluminum.

RE: Is there a back to back channel fastening pattern?

Using aluminum makes the channels only about 1/3 as stiff as steel, and probably much more expensive.

The modulus of elasticity of the wood is probably no better than 1/3 that of aluminum.

I'm wonder what properties need to be matched in your composite beam.
I suspect some kind of adhesive might be helpful or even necessary for real composite action.

RE: Is there a back to back channel fastening pattern?

The other issue to watch when fastening Al is the risk of galvanic corrosion.
If there is any risk of moisture reaching this you really need to take special care.

= = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = =
P.E. Metallurgy, consulting work welcomed

RE: Is there a back to back channel fastening pattern?

(OP)
@EdStainless they plan to fully insulate the area, spray foam an all. So there shouldn't be any moisture. On a slightly different note, my guy says he needs to run a conduit through all of my joists and beams. Is there such thing as a stiffener plate that I can put around the opening to transfer the load?

RE: Is there a back to back channel fastening pattern?

For floor joists there are rules about safe plumbing/electrical hole locations and size to not compromise bending stiffness and strength.

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