×
INTELLIGENT WORK FORUMS
FOR ENGINEERING PROFESSIONALS

Contact US

Log In

Come Join Us!

Are you an
Engineering professional?
Join Eng-Tips Forums!
  • Talk With Other Members
  • Be Notified Of Responses
    To Your Posts
  • Keyword Search
  • One-Click Access To Your
    Favorite Forums
  • Automated Signatures
    On Your Posts
  • Best Of All, It's Free!

*Eng-Tips's functionality depends on members receiving e-mail. By joining you are opting in to receive e-mail.

Posting Guidelines

Promoting, selling, recruiting, coursework and thesis posting is forbidden.

Students Click Here

PTC Thermistors in LV Motors

PTC Thermistors in LV Motors

PTC Thermistors in LV Motors

(OP)
How to consider PTC Thermistors in LV motors?
My understanding is that we need to consider a PTC thermistor where we get more heat in motors. Mostly we use them in VFD starter motors and large other starter motors. Who will determine the consideration of Thermistors? Electrical Design Engineer or Motor Manufacturer or others? Is there any general standard above what kW motors we need PTC thermistors? Please advise. Thanks.

RE: PTC Thermistors in LV Motors

Histor The ability to instrument equipment is a manufacturer responsibility. What that means is figuring how to do it in a safe, cost-effective, reliable fashion. The specific items that require instrumenting are usually defined by the equipment user, as it is often a function of how critical the machinery is to the process (or the financial bottom line). For equipment that is more critical to process success, or is more costly / time-consuming to fix, there is usually a higher degree of instrumentation. A "protect your investment" philosophy in action, if you will.

Instrumentation can be used to determine several parameters that can tell you about the health of the machine being monitored. These include: thermal sensors (winding and/or bearing temperatures, coolant temperatures, etc.), vibration sensors (bearings, drive train). power quality sensors (drive input/output harmonics, signal distortion, etc.), flow or pressure sensors (usually related to coolant but sometimes to lubricant), and so on.

The TYPE of instrument used to obtain a certain measurement is also usually defined by the equipment user - often because part of the control system is already existing, or there is an over-arching philosophy to it. For your specific example, there are multiple sensor types: resistance temperature detectors (RTDs), thermistors, thermocouples, infrared sensors, thermometers, bimetallic switches, and change-of-state (piezoelectric) devices. What you use is really up to you - and to device availability, in some cases.

In some cases, the user relies on the system designer to figure things out and create the specification. From the manufacturer's perspective, it makes no difference: it always boils down to "us" (the equipment - in this instance motor - manufacturer) or "them" (everyone else).

Converting energy to motion for more than half a century

RE: PTC Thermistors in LV Motors

Hi Hystor,

PTC thermistor ratings depend on the temperature rise of the motor. The OEM should perform several test in a prototype in order to determine what device should use and its ratings there are several methods for determining the temperature rise for the motors. IMO OEM is responsible for choosing the appropriate thermal protection for the windings in VFD-driven or standard motors.

Best Regards

Petronila

Red Flag This Post

Please let us know here why this post is inappropriate. Reasons such as off-topic, duplicates, flames, illegal, vulgar, or students posting their homework.

Red Flag Submitted

Thank you for helping keep Eng-Tips Forums free from inappropriate posts.
The Eng-Tips staff will check this out and take appropriate action.

Reply To This Thread

Posting in the Eng-Tips forums is a member-only feature.

Click Here to join Eng-Tips and talk with other members! Already a Member? Login



News


Close Box

Join Eng-Tips® Today!

Join your peers on the Internet's largest technical engineering professional community.
It's easy to join and it's free.

Here's Why Members Love Eng-Tips Forums:

Register now while it's still free!

Already a member? Close this window and log in.

Join Us             Close