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Is there is a proper standard for designing choosing and straight coupling splines?

Is there is a proper standard for designing choosing and straight coupling splines?

Is there is a proper standard for designing choosing and straight coupling splines?

(OP)
Commonly used in vehicle transmission input shaft and axle shafts for example.

Shown below both internal and external types.



RE: Is there is a proper standard for designing choosing and straight coupling splines?

please don't double post

= = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = =
P.E. Metallurgy, consulting work welcomed

RE: Is there is a proper standard for designing choosing and straight coupling splines?

(OP)
Sure, wasn't sure which one was the most appropriate section

RE: Is there is a proper standard for designing choosing and straight coupling splines?

SAE, ISO, and DIN all have standardized spline forms with supporting application notes. Poor lubrication conditions will add application specific challenges.

RE: Is there is a proper standard for designing choosing and straight coupling splines?

(OP)
Sorry but both of those are not this type.
J499 is parallel sides and 510206 involute splines.

The ones i am talking about are serrated splines cut with a standard lathe cutting tool (usually 90 degrees but could be any angle you want technically if you match the coupling)

See the difference here (edit, not very clear between involute and serrated, serrated can still have less teeth so there is no need for each tooth to follow the immediate one after, involute is defined by the involute tooth profile that cannot be observed by the photo):



Here's a better section but still not 100% accurate:




Also here are some videos showing how they are cut:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vxCV4TGGKls

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=10Y6W15fOms

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xPZ7hzLdgyU

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qTOSgI2bgxk

This type is the most commonly used spline because it's cheap and easy to make. Also it's probably better than the straight/parallel-sides spline because of less stress concentration and higher torque capacity, however this type is generally found in most agriculture PTO equipment still (probably due to legacy compatibility with older attachments)


RE: Is there is a proper standard for designing choosing and straight coupling splines?

The linked video is gone.

RE: Is there is a proper standard for designing choosing and straight coupling splines?

I work with aircraft applications, but all three type of splines are used. how ever 45 deg, splines are a pita. I prefer involute splines.
45 deg splines change on size with any post operations.

RE: Is there is a proper standard for designing choosing and straight coupling splines?

(OP)
Yes involute is the ideal spline form but requires special tooling to cut, that's why it's not as common especially for coupling splines. However it's very common in gear teeth.

RE: Is there is a proper standard for designing choosing and straight coupling splines?

Not strictly true. A rack with the correct straight flanked teeth will cut an involute into a shaft if it is progressively fed across as the shaft is rotated. You wouldn't do it that way by choice, but that's how it would have been done once upon a time

http://david.rysdam.org/machining/gears.html

Thinking about oit an easier way would be to use a cutter with straight flanks, and put the shaft on the bed of the milling machine. I think that's how i did it at college

Cheers

Greg Locock


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RE: Is there is a proper standard for designing choosing and straight coupling splines?

Storm33

30 degree spline are very common.
for high volume spline rolling, for moderate production spline hobbing and shaping , low to high volume spline grinding. I mostly work with mostly ANSI B92.i, again aircraft applications.
if the parts are high volume the tooling is relative inexpensive because the tooling is amortized by quantity of parts. the required quality and runout required will dictate the machining method.

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