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Old material designation?

Old material designation?

Old material designation?

(OP)
So I'm going through a CMM for an Airbus Component and they reference the following materials:

Z 100C 17 Steel
APX 4
AU 2 CN (T6)
UA 10N

I tried a couple of these and didn't get any useful search results. Could anyone narrow down the search range for me so I can find out what these materials are? I'm guessing it's a spec from a specific European Country that got rolled into a more commonly references spec.

Thanks all,

-Kirby

Kirby Wilkerson

Remember, first define the problem, then solve it.

RE: Old material designation?

French AIR 9160C for Z 100C 17 Steel

Possibly AIR 9048 for AU 2 CN (don't have a complete copy of this one to confirm).

No idea about the other two.

RE: Old material designation?

KW... any 'context' for these fragments of spec numbers???

I assuming You've already tried the ASM handbook for alloys VS specifications? I've forgotten the title... will look for it.

Regards, Wil Taylor
o Trust - But Verify!
o We believe to be true what we prefer to be true. [Unknown]
o For those who believe, no proof is required; for those who cannot believe, no proof is possible. [variation,Stuart Chase]
o Unfortunately, in science what You 'believe' is irrelevant. ["Orion", Homebuiltairplanes.com forum]

RE: Old material designation?

(OP)
I was actually thinking these were the specs that I wasn't able to find. I was just wanting the equivalent alloy designation that I'm familiar with. I don't have an ASM handbook. I'll get me a copy. This is just for reference. When they tell me a material, I like to know what it is. I could just say steel. and aluminum and not worry about it, until I need to know. That just makes feel like I've done an incomplete job.

Here's some snippets from the CMM for a servo motor:





Thanks all,

-Kirby

Kirby Wilkerson

Remember, first define the problem, then solve it.

RE: Old material designation?

At least 2, if not all of them are AFNOR AIR specifications, which are often written without the gaps so (ASM metals handbooks for one).
So
Z100C17
APX4
AU2CN
UA10N

RE: Old material designation?

UA10N is a common French Aluminum Nickel Bronze alloy used for aerospace bushings. It's typically expressed as CuAl10Ni5Fe3 - try LeBronze alloys, had no issues getting this material in bar or tube stock. Spent many years working in a US division of a French OEM and material alternatives, especially to aircraft designed in the 1960's and 1970's, was a constant project. You may also encounter another bronze alloy, UZ19A6, which is a common French bushing material.

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