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Sealing a workshop concrete floor.

Sealing a workshop concrete floor.

Sealing a workshop concrete floor.

(OP)
No heating temp goes down to -30.

Cars and tractors will be on it.

What would you seal the concrete with?

RE: Sealing a workshop concrete floor.

-30, in Scotland... gonna have to dump the kilts, or your much stronger than I. I'd probably use a high build silane/siloxane sealer; there are lots of them available on the market. The big question is, "Are you looking at protecting the concrete from something specific. You can contact a local supplier to see what's locally available. I've attached my SOG paper... there's some stuff on sealers and concrete. It's a work in progress... and includes my latest info. The sealer stuff is near the bottom.

Rather than think climate change and the corona virus as science, think of it as the wrath of God. Feel any better?

-Dik

RE: Sealing a workshop concrete floor.

There is something that is called stone oil it's made of linseed oil, I think we use something similar at work, it becomes very hard.
I might be able to find out what we uses at work if you want, but it is indoors, but there's a lot of ware on the floors there.

There is also product called Lithurin, seems to be some hokuspokus. winky smile

“Logic will get you from A to Z; imagination will get you everywhere.“
Albert Einstein

RE: Sealing a workshop concrete floor.

(OP)
It's that new slab foundation in Estonia that I did in the foundations thread.

I am going back there next week after this work cycle.

I put plastic on it after 24h and can't make up my mine to leave it with plastic on until march or take it off. I had a look for sealant locally and the only time they seem to deal it is when they are going to tile it.

When I go next week I will check for cracking and cement any up before water gets in them and starts freeze thawing.

RE: Sealing a workshop concrete floor.

Quote:

-30, in Scotland... gonna have to dump the kilts, or your much stronger than I
LOL, that is what you get if you buy a house near the Russian boarder.
I am sure the kilt will do the job if you add some wool under ware. tongue

“Logic will get you from A to Z; imagination will get you everywhere.“
Albert Einstein

RE: Sealing a workshop concrete floor.

Linseed oil was a standby for decades... but, there are better products out there. I would avoid it for any serious exposure. You might be thinking about sodium silicate, aka "water glass" as a sealer. It 'dries' hard.

Rather than think climate change and the corona virus as science, think of it as the wrath of God. Feel any better?

-Dik

RE: Sealing a workshop concrete floor.

(OP)
I know there must be some good stuff out there from the workshops in Aberdeen. Some seemed to be new even after 10 years oil gear abusing them. Others it was like the surface of the moon.

RE: Sealing a workshop concrete floor.

Quote (kilt will do the job if you add some wool under ware.)


I hear they use live sheep... road sign in Scotland, "NO EWE TURNS."

Rather than think climate change and the corona virus as science, think of it as the wrath of God. Feel any better?

-Dik

RE: Sealing a workshop concrete floor.

Epoxy is the premium product.

RE: Sealing a workshop concrete floor.

Hmm we have used both two component stuff at work and some other type it's smells awful but it's sade it's none toxic.
So the production people can do it.

This Lithurin not sure what it is, there is no good explanation of it more then it is a chemical reaction with the concrete that seals it and it sinks in.
Not particularly expensive either, not sure if that is good or bad. ponder

“Logic will get you from A to Z; imagination will get you everywhere.“
Albert Einstein

RE: Sealing a workshop concrete floor.

(OP)
Perfect advice thanks to you all Marine Floor epoxy will be sourced.

It's one of these daft things reds. It seems to be a secret what to use that works.

The epoxy will more than like be 2 times the cost of the normal stuff. But that will need redone after 3 years. The epoxy stuff will be good for 12 plus.

RE: Sealing a workshop concrete floor.

See Pre-Prime 167 for a similar product from Azko Nobel (European).

RE: Sealing a workshop concrete floor.

(OP)
Thanks they have an office near to where I live.

How much per sqr ft or sqr m would you recommend?

RE: Sealing a workshop concrete floor.

On steel it coats at 1 mil. For concrete it's going to vary greatly with porosity.

RE: Sealing a workshop concrete floor.

Quote:

It's one of these daft things reds. It seems to be a secret what to use that works.

Yes I always get a bit suspicious when there isn't any clear facts on how things work or a table of contents.
Either it's a new invention patented and they don't want anyone to find out or it is bogus. smile
Must admit I haven't looked around hard enough, things cant be sold here unless it has a table of contents and a hazard sheet.
If it is new it might be good though hard to know if there isn't any references.

“Logic will get you from A to Z; imagination will get you everywhere.“
Albert Einstein

RE: Sealing a workshop concrete floor.

(OP)
I will go into the office and see what they say.

Might seal it then put a warehouse floor paint over the top of it from the same company.

Usually the good stuff is now band for environmental reason's. smile

RE: Sealing a workshop concrete floor.

Plan ahead when using epoxy paints. They have maximum re-coat intervals. If you don't apply subsequent coats in time you will not get good adhesion.

RE: Sealing a workshop concrete floor.

(OP)
Will bring that up when I go to speak to them.

Don't want to have to empty the place every 3 years.

RE: Sealing a workshop concrete floor.

I have used polyurethane varnish with good results. Need to thoroughly wash the concrete and etch with HCl (available as muriatic acid).

RE: Sealing a workshop concrete floor.

High build epoxies and polyurethane coatings are great.

Rather than think climate change and the corona virus as science, think of it as the wrath of God. Feel any better?

-Dik

RE: Sealing a workshop concrete floor.

Do you want a coating or a sealer? Epoxies and urethanes are coatings...they wear off. Sealers penetrate the concrete pores. Some create reactions with the calcium in the concrete to fill the pores and create a hard surface. Most of the sodium silicate hardeners will do this. You can get variations such as calcium silicates and lithium silicates.

Another penetrating sealer uses methacrylate penetrants. These are very good, but they are expensive and add no surface enhancements to the concrete such as hardening.

RE: Sealing a workshop concrete floor.

(OP)
Seal mostly not going to be able to empty the place after i move stuff in to recoat it.

The inside will be down to -30 in winter.

And i believe sealing will help with frost stopping water getting into the surface and then freeze thawing.

RE: Sealing a workshop concrete floor.

(OP)
i didn't bother taking the plastic off....

It all under 3ft of snow now.

RE: Sealing a workshop concrete floor.

Yes, you got our leftovers. winky smile

“Logic will get you from A to Z; imagination will get you everywhere.“
Albert Einstein

RE: Sealing a workshop concrete floor.

Alistair,
Good to see you posting today. Take it you weren't working into Riga yesterday.
A

RE: Sealing a workshop concrete floor.

Ohhh I didn't know, and it was from Stockholm too.

Quote:

The Latvian airline airBaltic confirms that on December 3, 2021, during a heavy snowfall, its flight BT102 from Stockholm to Riga performed with Airbus A220-300 YL-CSE aircraft slid off the runway during the landing at Riga Airport.

Good thing no one seems to have gotten hurt.

“Logic will get you from A to Z; imagination will get you everywhere.“
Albert Einstein

RE: Sealing a workshop concrete floor.

(OP)
not me....

i was on the way back from my farm after fixing snow blowers . It was chucking down with snow.

RE: Sealing a workshop concrete floor.

Didn't think so. winky smile
Snow blowers??
Do you need more snow then you already have?

“Logic will get you from A to Z; imagination will get you everywhere.“
Albert Einstein

RE: Sealing a workshop concrete floor.

(OP)
I was a an idiot last year and didn't always pump the tyres up before using it. So they both had a leak on the valve stem through the hub rotating against the tube.

And of course during summer i forgot about it.

There has been 30 cm fallen in the last week,

So if I want to be able to arrive late and get the car in the road I need it to be working. So compressor is ready tyres changed 98 in it....

Also the temp is meant to go down to -20 this week. which is a tad early in the year so I drained all the water out above ground level.

RE: Sealing a workshop concrete floor.

lol Sorry, in Sweden they are called snow throwers.
Here a snow blower is something you connect to a water hose and a compressor and make artificial snow.

At least the Latvian Foreign Minister took it with ease.

“Logic will get you from A to Z; imagination will get you everywhere.“
Albert Einstein

RE: Sealing a workshop concrete floor.

OK you're going with epoxy. I did too.
One problem is that it's slippery when wet. I suggest mixing in just a little bit of sand to give some traction to the floor. Actually, if you look at those suppliers' web pages, this is probably a known problem and they give you an additive or some other product you can put in the mix.

RE: Sealing a workshop concrete floor.

(OP)
That supplier that Tug suggested definitely seems to know there job. They have a local office which I will go and visit.

the politician I suspect he has gone off road in an aircraft before.

Its part and parcel of living and flying in Scandinavia and the Nordics it sometimes happens. The ground is frozen so there is seldom much damage apart from pride. And the fresh snow is a brilliant low G speed arrestor.

Touch wood its never happened to me yet but that more by luck than skill.

Once went out with a ground ops, in north sweden, car to do a Captains check before departure and as he turned onto the runway we started spinning and ended up off the side. And we held for 4 hours until they eventually managed to get the MU above 0.25. Which took loads of chemicals and hot sand. I just said to the tower guy when I was brought in afterwards on a skiidoo. Baking action poo off a shiny shovel....

I have to say though that hot sand you use in the north of Sweden gives a lovely surface on compacted ice.



I really don't know any details. There will be an investigation by the authorities and company but it will take a while for it to be complete.

They will have done a download off the aircraft and sent it over to canada so if it was a machine issue we would have heard about it by now. I was called in off a day off yesterday to sort out the knock on effect of the airport closing afterwards.

RE: Sealing a workshop concrete floor.

Sometimes if they can't keep the sand warm they mix it with a bit of salt, at least when they put it on walkways and roads, not sure they do it on the landing strip though.
On the big roads they just put salt, especially when it is around zero and they don't expect snow.
No one likes it, everyone want's them to stop, it can actually become slippery because of it even, if it is still on the tires when going on a road with just snow and ice.

Never though about it before but is there breaks on the wheels on the aircraft?
Seems like the breaks would be to small for the mass if there where.
Always thought they braked with the ailerons and the flaps.


“Logic will get you from A to Z; imagination will get you everywhere.“
Albert Einstein

RE: Sealing a workshop concrete floor.

Stopping on the ground is done with brakes on the main wheels. They aren't big, so they can get very hot - the temperature is managed by applying operational limitations.

From this week's crop of reports:

The jet that rejected a takeoff at Newark in August (when the tower politely pointed out that they were bombing down a taxiway, rather than the runway they had been cleared to use) had to cool its heels for 45 minutes before being allowed another go.

One at Shannon (also in August) aborted at higher speed than the limitations allow (somebody had left a window open and they thought they had got up to 100 or 120kt, rather the 149 it said on the instruments, against a decision speed of 146) and had been blithely taxying back to the stand for 28 minutes (using braking to help the jet take the corners) when one wheel caught fire.

A.

RE: Sealing a workshop concrete floor.

(OP)
We have per wheel which there is 4 of them.



They are extremely powerful if the tyres can get a grip on the runway.

RE: Sealing a workshop concrete floor.

(OP)
Rejected is a media term.

We use low energy abort below 80 or high energy above that before v1

A high energy can blow tyres out

RE: Sealing a workshop concrete floor.

My former employer, an aircraft wheel and brake supplier, used the term rejected take off as well.

RE: Sealing a workshop concrete floor.

(OP)
its the old V sqt kicking in.

To me the gear, tyres and brakes are one the much under appreciated bits of engineering on an aircraft. They get cold soaked at -65 for hours on end and then are expected to give peak performance and a temp rise of 100 plus degs in a matter of seconds.

Sub 80knts the amount of energy they need to absorb is relatively easy to contain at max take-off weight. Over that in some ways it becomes a sacrificial usage of them. An abort just before V1 is a bomb load of energy to deal with, fire may occur, tyre fuse plugs may melt and release deflating the tyres etc.

So there are rejected takeoffs and rejected takeoff's. Which is what we would say on the radio to ATC who just need to know we are not going. But in reality the difference between the two technically and energy wise is colossal.

You can over temp the brakes taxiing in places like Madrid which is hot and high and it can take 30 mins to get to the departure runway and your limited taxing speed. As you can see in the diagram above the modern machines have sensors on them so we get a caution in the cockpit when they get hot. You just have to sit for 10 mins until they get back into the green band. The older machines they have to take the weight and speed ambient temp then go into a table which will give a time which is usually hugely conservative. Carbon brakes V steel brakes is another factor. Short sector multiple cycle short turn round airlines will opt for the steel to aid brake temp reduction. Longer sector airlines long turn round will opt for carbon to save fuel burn due to them being lighter.

Jets are a lot more feisty for directional control when the runway friction is low. For the brakes to give max out put you have to be able to transfer the load through the tyres and if they can't get the friction onto the runway...

Turboprops are easier because you can slam the engines into beta reverse and still get impressive amounts of deceleration. You can also have direction control with asymmetric reverse. And doing that doesn't give you hot brakes.

Braking action poor which is under Mu 0.2 is icerink slippy. you can't walk on it

RE: Sealing a workshop concrete floor.

(OP)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=irTizOVM-3U

This is the vid I got shown in training with the message of keep the hell away from the gear.

The brakes are at over 1500 deg C and then they are putting cold water onto them of course they are going to explode sending shrapnel everywhere.

RE: Sealing a workshop concrete floor.

Metal doesn't explode when quenched. The explosions are likely the tires failing.

Did you just link a video of a rejected take-off?

RE: Sealing a workshop concrete floor.

Gee, nice to know that metal doesn't explode when quenched. Then I wonder why the Navy took hot brakes so seriously going on forty years ago. Why bother holding planes with hot brakes away from the flight line if there wasn't a risk? Certainly inconvenient to be held in the plane for how ever long it was before the plane was deemed safe enough to be allowed to the flight line and those on board allowed out.

I’ll see your silver lining and raise you two black clouds. - Protection Operations

RE: Sealing a workshop concrete floor.

(OP)
They have fuse plugs in them that melt when the temperature gets to high that let the nitrogen gas out. Think there is two per tyre.

I don't know what he process is that causes the destructive failure of the brake pack when water is applied in high volumes when they are extremely hot. But know its likely to happen. They are meant to use foam not water to remove the o2 not take the heat out with cold water. I presume its colossal thermal gradients set up internal thermal stresses which causes fast failure. They are split hubs so it could be the hub retaining ring goes and its the tyre pressure which provides a lot of the energy to make things kinetic.

I just know not to let the pax go anywhere near them and not to go and have a look myself.

I have a lot of respect for the gear, tyres and brakes. But I would say I am in the minority. The way we use them day to day can have a colossal effect on maint costs that's even without them doing anything special.

I have never done a performance limited high energy abort apart from in the sim. If I managed to get through my career avoiding that experience I will be happy enough.

And don't know is there is a big difference with these electrically actuated brakes instead of the hydraulic ones which have 2500 + psi of hydraulic accumulator plus engine pump feeding them.

As such I don't really need to know the in's and outs of the failure modes. Just need to know to keep everyone the hell away from them and leave the fire service and techs to deal with them.

What I do know though is Bombardier has arranged that I have full protection as long as 1 of those BDCU's are working and then things get interesting when you in alternative braking mode or using the final apply the hand brake which will cause the tyres to blow out when the wheels lock up. Electrical power has i think 5 backups, to provide power.

RE: Sealing a workshop concrete floor.

(OP)
Can't find anything aviation related

But this is pretty much engineering porn

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dKlJJqHFfoQ

When I was in the army the filling of the lorry tyres was again taught by a punch to the face if you were anywhere near the things while filling them in the field.

Come to think of it, I wonder how they train soldiers these PC days. Pretty much every safety omission resulted in our QMSI just smacking you one. It was very effective way of installing safety procedures into 18 year old young lads. And they are still with me 32 years later.

RE: Sealing a workshop concrete floor.

Unless the accident went up and stayed up, they probably found a way.

RE: Sealing a workshop concrete floor.

It was never my job to sidle up to a jet that had just done a long taxy and poke a Comark probe in to the pre-drilled holes in the tyre bead - but I knew the bloke who did it - a braver man than I'll ever be.

A.

RE: Sealing a workshop concrete floor.

I don't know the present practice but in the British Columbia mountains the logging trucks used to cool the brakes with water.
Some of the trucks carried a couple of hundred gallons of water.
It was piped to the wheels and nozzles directed the water to the top of the brake drums.
The water was always turned on before starting down the grade so that the heat built up evenly.
On a long hill there would be a cloud of steam from each wheel.
I had a wild ride one day when something plugged the water line to my trailer.
A friend of mine on a long downgrade did not realize that he was seeing smoke not steam from his trailer wheels.
He set fire to and burned off eight tires and was lucky not to lose the logs.

Today, with Jake brakes and disc brakes the water cooled brakes are probably gone.

The latest in Jake brakes is the High Power Density Jake brake.
The original Jake released the hot compressed gas at the top of the exhaust stroke.
The HPD Jake alters the valve timing to admit air on what would normally be the power stroke. (Remember that the exhaust valve has just opened to release the air charge.)
Then that is released at the top of the stroke.
This gives a braking action at each stroke of the piston rather than at each second stroke that the original Jake provided.

--------------------
Ohm's law
Not just a good idea;
It's the LAW!

RE: Sealing a workshop concrete floor.

(OP)
Visited them in the office today.

They advise an epoxy sealant and 48 hours later another epoxy layer of the same mix with a friction grip additive.

The guys dad lives 20 km away and he wants to replace his dads barn as well so.... He wants a floating foundation like mine and wants the Brother in law to do the forming work. And... 15m by 6 meters will work for him as well... So consultancy fee and keeping the BIL sober to do it is the goods price. And we can dual up for discount off the log barn production guys.

I love this soviet stuff dealing with people. Not dissimilar to oil in Aberdeen where a bottle of whisky could get you a 40 ton artic for a few hours if you needed it or access to a machine shop.

RE: Sealing a workshop concrete floor.

Well it might not be good for the total economy though. winky smile
When I grow up we had a neighbor that still is one of my mothers best friends.
He was self employed and hade a tractor firm and he is also is and still are a amateur trotter horse trainer and owner.
He always says "det är bättre med kontakter än kontanter" it is better with contacts then cash. smile

“Logic will get you from A to Z; imagination will get you everywhere.“
Albert Einstein

RE: Sealing a workshop concrete floor.

Around here when the epoxy a floor in a garage they mechanically roughen it.
They say that etching will not provide enough profile to good bonding.

= = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = =
P.E. Metallurgy, consulting work welcomed

RE: Sealing a workshop concrete floor.

Roughening the concrete surface is good, but can still be slippery... when grit is added, the durability of the finish is impaired.

Rather than think climate change and the corona virus as science, think of it as the wrath of God. Feel any better?

-Dik

RE: Sealing a workshop concrete floor.

Quote (They advise an epoxy sealant and 48 hours later another epoxy layer of the same mix with a friction grip additive.)


That would improve on the quality of seal. Some epoxies have a very small window (<48 hrs) when it comes to a re-application.

Rather than think climate change and the corona virus as science, think of it as the wrath of God. Feel any better?

-Dik

RE: Sealing a workshop concrete floor.

(OP)
I will be running a grinding disk over it anyway same as I did with the UFH scree before tiles. Mainly to get rid of all that dusty surface concrete crud.

The guy just said "yes" when I said that was my intended preparation.

And he was very adamant that the second coat had to be done in a 36-48 hour window. No doing it and leaving it for a couple of weeks then coming back.

As usual my job is small feed.

Its not grit apparently its crushed up shells.

RE: Sealing a workshop concrete floor.

With epoxies and other coatings, it's better to get a chemical bonding rather than a mechanical one.

Rather than think climate change and the corona virus as science, think of it as the wrath of God. Feel any better?

-Dik

RE: Sealing a workshop concrete floor.

(OP)
please explain what you would use as a chemical bond.

There is a solution that you put on before the first coat but I don't know what it does.

RE: Sealing a workshop concrete floor.

bonding the coating to itself; that's why the narrow window, sometimes. It's more crucial to coating systems that are really high quality. Chemical bonding is more reliable than mechanical bonding.

Rather than think climate change and the corona virus as science, think of it as the wrath of God. Feel any better?

-Dik

RE: Sealing a workshop concrete floor.

For concrete, assume zero tensile strength. Coatings that sit on the surface may as well be applied over a layer of dust. You need a product that can wet out in to the concrete hence the low viscosity penetrating epoxies.

Epoxies in general have primary and secondary bonding characteristics. They bond by adhesion and by polymerization. Once the epoxy has fully polymerized, only the adhesion components of the bond is left. It's important to re-apply coats of epoxy paints before polymerization ends.

So, apply your penetrating epoxy and then subsequent coats quickly afterwards. Don't dilly dally.

Epoxy paints will chalk in sunlight so you may want to consider a cosmetic topcoat, usually polyurethane or siloxane.

RE: Sealing a workshop concrete floor.

(OP)
Sounds like that's what the plan is with this stuff. The first coat gets into the porous top surface and binds. Then the second one 36 hours later with the shells in it binds to that.

He definitely thought it was a good idea to run the grinder over it to get rid of that top crud layer which he said was something to do with O2 exposure during phase 2 and 3 of the concrete curing what ever the hell that is.

It was a great suggestion tug and I am extremely lucky that the guy has bought into my project on a personal level. My gut feel is he knows his poo and it will work so quiet happy to run with it. Plus it gives my brother in law and his mate a weeks work doing his place. And my form work wood gets another use out of it instead of going onto the fire pit.

So all in all its a win win.

And it looks like things are expanding rapidly at work so back to being a Captain, so any luck I can afford to get the barn delivered for my two weeks holiday end of October.

RE: Sealing a workshop concrete floor.

(OP)


Plastic off no cracking and one set of cat prints.

Bad news is wood has hit 600 euro a ton so it won't be built this year.

RE: Sealing a workshop concrete floor.

Looking good. thumbsup2 must have been a small cat. winky smile
Planing on putting on the surface finish then. ponder

“Logic will get you from A to Z; imagination will get you everywhere.“
Albert Einstein

RE: Sealing a workshop concrete floor.

(OP)
Will just leave it until we are ready to build. I won't grind it until then. Then put the bottom wall in. Then seal it.


Unless of course the group wisdom is to do it sooner.

Would have to get the wall surveyed in and cemented though. Which isn't impossible.

RE: Sealing a workshop concrete floor.

From the picture it looks nice enough, do you really think you need to grind it?
Maybe it would be easiest just to have it covered, to keep it clean until you are going to finish it?

“Logic will get you from A to Z; imagination will get you everywhere.“
Albert Einstein

RE: Sealing a workshop concrete floor.

How much was wood last year?

What are the chances it won't go down much for a couple of years or at all?

Remember - More details = better answers
Also: If you get a response it's polite to respond to it.

RE: Sealing a workshop concrete floor.

(OP)
Pre Ukraine it had gone to 250 euro a ton during covid from 150 euro.

During covid there was only two entry points from Russia bring wood in. Now there are none open. And no way to pay for it even if you could get it in.

There is still a Q of lorry's trying to get back to Russia waiting empty at the border. The EU ones trying to get back seem to have got back now.

RE: Sealing a workshop concrete floor.

Aah. An unintended consequence...

Better get Red to get her chainsaw out....

Remember - More details = better answers
Also: If you get a response it's polite to respond to it.

RE: Sealing a workshop concrete floor.

(OP)
its going to be a workshop floor don't care what it looks like.

And the plastic was getting to be a PAI and I wanted to reuse it before it flogged itself to death. The plastic isn't cheap either these days and it a perfect size to do the sauna when I get round to that and line the steps form work which is the next concreting job when it goes above freezing at night.

RE: Sealing a workshop concrete floor.

(OP)
A lot of the cost is getting it dry structural. If I was willing to use green wood it would half in price. But then you have to hand tool it all. And apparently mixing the dry support beams etc with green wood is a recipe for disaster.

RE: Sealing a workshop concrete floor.

Ugh. Once you get cat prints, must start over. LOL

Looks nice!

ctopher, CSWP
SolidWorks '19
ctophers home
SolidWorks Legion

RE: Sealing a workshop concrete floor.

Yes mixing dry/green lumber can be a disaster.
I have a friend here in the US with a similar building project.
He is buying small amounts of lumber when he can get a good price.
It may take him all year to get the materials that he needs.

I do like the idea of waiting and then giving the floor a grind before you coat.
It would give you a good surface.
The re-coat rules have to do with the two layers both curing and bonding to each other.
Most epoxy can tolerate having a modest amount of grit added to the topcoat without issues.

= = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = =
P.E. Metallurgy, consulting work welcomed

RE: Sealing a workshop concrete floor.

(OP)
I don't want to cement the wall to sealed concrete. This mechie thinks that the wet cement needs to get at the concrete clean to get a good bond.

So grind then cement wall will work best.

RE: Sealing a workshop concrete floor.

(OP)
Oh and the paying a proper surveyor to do the wall is causing mucho argument's. 300 euro to get someone with the proper kit that gets it within a ball hair is a much better idea that a day of arguments screwing around banging posts in several times Trying to get the diagonals right.

RE: Sealing a workshop concrete floor.

Haha but just half as fun. tongue
You can always sitt on the patio and drink beer and have some salt and vinegar chips and let them do the running and just make a diagonal measurement to see if it turned out right afterwards, otherwise it's just to start over. winky smile

“Logic will get you from A to Z; imagination will get you everywhere.“
Albert Einstein

RE: Sealing a workshop concrete floor.

(OP)
exactly which is why I want a proper survey crew in because the last time we did that with the foundations and it was anywhere between 5 cm and 20 cm out on the diagonals.

RE: Sealing a workshop concrete floor.

Screw wood!
Go with metal.
Check on prefabbed steel buildings. Termites will hate you.

Keith Cress
kcress - http://www.flaminsystems.com

RE: Sealing a workshop concrete floor.

We don't have termites. tongue
And a steel garage wouldn't have the right look for the place. winky smile
Actually I think it needs to be a wood garage and it should be a bit crooked and skewered so it will have the right feel to it. lol



“Logic will get you from A to Z; imagination will get you everywhere.“
Albert Einstein

RE: Sealing a workshop concrete floor.

(OP)
Metal is through the roof as well. And we have wooden buildings which are hundreds of years old here.

Woodworm and dry rot and wet rot we have bucketful's though

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Low-Volume Rapid Injection Molding With 3D Printed Molds
Learn methods and guidelines for using stereolithography (SLA) 3D printed molds in the injection molding process to lower costs and lead time. Discover how this hybrid manufacturing process enables on-demand mold fabrication to quickly produce small batches of thermoplastic parts. Download Now
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Taking Control of Engineering Documents
This ebook covers tips for creating and managing workflows, security best practices and protection of intellectual property, Cloud vs. on-premise software solutions, CAD file management, compliance, and more. Download Now

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