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Run BLDC form the 220V grid

Run BLDC form the 220V grid

Run BLDC form the 220V grid

(OP)
Hi! I am trying to use the BLDC motor in home appliances and I wondering if there is a simple way of running a BLDC motor (1.5kW) from a 220V AC grid.

To my limited knowledge, I would need an AC-DC converter and an ESC to create the three-phase for the BLDC. While ESCs are rather affordable, the AC-CD converter of such powers seems to be really large.

Pardon my basic questions.

Thanks in advance!

RE: Run BLDC form the 220V grid

There are so many missing details here it's not possible to make any suggestions. Because of this, I believe you are way over your head and possibly going to injure yourself (die) or waste a great deal of money mucking about learning all about what you shouldn't have done.

I suggest you find someone local with the skills needed to work with you to come up with a valid and successful solution to your needs.

Keith Cress
kcress - http://www.flaminsystems.com

RE: Run BLDC form the 220V grid

(OP)
HEhe, no one is getting killed just yet. I was just exercising the thought if that would be possible. There is an application where conventional commutator motors are not applicable and I was having a thought of using a BLDC:

RE: Run BLDC form the 220V grid

Why not just use an induction motor?

Bill
--------------------
"Why not the best?"
Jimmy Carter

RE: Run BLDC form the 220V grid

One specific reason is that BLDC motors have controllers built in which can substantially reduce costs vs using a VFD and possibly an encoder. Either that or OP is unfamiliar with 3-phase induction motors, VFDs, static phase converters, etc...

An AC-DC converter can be as simple as a diode. Even full bridge rectifiers are quite small and inexpensive. The filter capacitors are the largest components, if you even need them. It depends how much ripple your system can tolerate.

RE: Run BLDC form the 220V grid

Don't forget single phase induction motors.
You don't need an internal starting switch.
There are lots of external starting devices.
Hot wire relays;
Potential relays;
Solid state starters.
Hundreds of millions of single phase refrigeration compressors start with an external starting device.

Bill
--------------------
"Why not the best?"
Jimmy Carter

RE: Run BLDC form the 220V grid

(OP)
Hi guys and thanks for help. We want to go for the BLDC because of the high power density. The motor has to be approximately 100mm x 80mm in dimension, similar to this one.

(https://hobbyking.com/en_us/turnigy-xk-4074-2000kv...)

Do you know any induction motors that could produce this kind of power in such a compact design?

RE: Run BLDC form the 220V grid

Good point on the power density.
Did you read the customer reviews?
It runs hot and fast: 50,000 RPM

Quote (Review)

it spins too fast to be any use in there though...

Quote (Review)

Speed runs on 6S easily get the motor past 180F even to beyond 200F which is too hot.
Yes, a 3000 Watt power supply at 25 Volts will be a little heavy.

Bill
--------------------
"Why not the best?"
Jimmy Carter

RE: Run BLDC form the 220V grid

Who says 200F is too hot? NEMA and IEC spec motors typical have a temperature rise of 40°C or 50°C over ambient with a max ambient rating of 50°C. This puts their normal operating temperature right in that range.

RE: Run BLDC form the 220V grid

(OP)
Yes, so we would also not run it at 3kW for longer than a few seconds, so I don't see the thermal part as an issue.

I am more curious if there are any motors in the same price range that are at higher voltage loke 220V?

RE: Run BLDC form the 220V grid

What about a Dyson vacuum cleaner motor?

The one that they call a "digital motor" is evidently a switched-reluctance brushless motor, and since it is meant to be used in home appliance, will be set up to operate on mains voltage through a proprietary controller.

The operating speed is 100,000 rpm plus ... and I don't know what would happen if you tried to use one for something other than a vacuum cleaner which inherently draws a lot of cooling air around it.

RE: Run BLDC form the 220V grid

For maximum power density and direct 230 V use, a universal motor comes to mind. They tend to be noisy, though.

RE: Run BLDC form the 220V grid

Universal motors are not inherently noisy. Vacuum cleaners are rumored to be noisy by design so they sound powerful. Railway traction motors are wound the same (arrangement not wire size power or speed), and are definitely NOT noisy.

Universal motors have a torque vs speed map that fits variable torque applications well, and applications that need a fixed speed poorly. They are controllable with a variable resistance in series (or a solid state device that mimics a resistor).

Fred

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