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FEMAP: Two (2) or More Tris into One (1) Quad

FEMAP: Two (2) or More Tris into One (1) Quad

FEMAP: Two (2) or More Tris into One (1) Quad

(OP)
Hello,

I realize it's been almost 6yrs since the original post date, but I saw this today while looking for a solution to a similar issue, & figured this may help someone else.

The original post (minus extra line breaks) was:
"When meshing sometimes I get two tri elements (a quad split in two) where I could have easily a quad.
Does someone knows of a way to avoid this?
Thank you,
W" - Ref. https://www.eng-tips.com/viewthread.cfm?qid=336310...

After reading this post, I found that, in my case, I had an infinitesimal curve along the perimeter of my surface that was causing what could have easily been one (1) QUAD to instead be modeled as two (2) TRIs. Upon this discovery, I used the Meshing Toolbox's "Combined/Composite Curves" --> "Add By Point" function to combine the infinitesimal curve with the main curve of that part of the surface perimeter, & the auto-remesh solution indeed created the 1 QUAD that I was hoping to see.
**Please note that, originally, the surface meshed was a regular surface I had Converted from a Boundary Surface. Apparently, it was this conversion that created the extra infinitesimal curve along the perimeter, but I failed to notice/check that prior to meshing the surface, so I didn't assume extra curves along the perimeter were created.**

Hopefully this helps someone in a similar situation.

Best regards, everyone.

RE: FEMAP: Two (2) or More Tris into One (1) Quad

There is new option in femap 11.3 and newer versions - "Max Quads", you can try it.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pzIMKxNCDGU
Other vice you always can delete two triangles and manually create quad element. You then should associate new element with geometry to apply geometrical loads.

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