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Compute sound insulation

Compute sound insulation

Compute sound insulation

(OP)
Helllo, it's my first post so please be patient with me.

I want to compute the acoustic insultation for some wall. I know R value for thermal insulation but I doesn't know what to do for noise.

Thanks for your help

Yves

RE: Compute sound insulation

The R-value is of no value for acoustical properties! There are many ways to learn the fundamentals of noise control on the Internet. Here is a link to a vendor with some basic information under Resources -> Acoustics 101:
https://www.acousticalsurfaces.com/

If this is a commercial or inductrial application, then I suggest hiring a experienced consultant for assistance.

Walt

RE: Compute sound insulation

There is a lot of waffle written about tuned layers and so on, but the reality is that if you seal all the holes and increase the mass loading per unit area then that is a pretty good predictor for transmission loss. The fancy tuned systems do work a bit, but it is not night and day, more mass almost always wins. Beranek covers the calculations as well as any I've seen.

You might want to look into cavity systems (double glazing) as well, they can actually be quite good, if you have room and budget.

Cheers

Greg Locock


New here? Try reading these, they might help FAQ731-376: Eng-Tips.com Forum Policies http://eng-tips.com/market.cfm?

RE: Compute sound insulation

Don't forget with sound, attenuation varies drastically with frequency.

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