×
INTELLIGENT WORK FORUMS
FOR ENGINEERING PROFESSIONALS

Contact US

Log In

Come Join Us!

Are you an
Engineering professional?
Join Eng-Tips Forums!
  • Talk With Other Members
  • Be Notified Of Responses
    To Your Posts
  • Keyword Search
  • One-Click Access To Your
    Favorite Forums
  • Automated Signatures
    On Your Posts
  • Best Of All, It's Free!

*Eng-Tips's functionality depends on members receiving e-mail. By joining you are opting in to receive e-mail.

Posting Guidelines

Promoting, selling, recruiting, coursework and thesis posting is forbidden.

Students Click Here

How to anchor brick shelf angles to a wood building?

How to anchor brick shelf angles to a wood building?

How to anchor brick shelf angles to a wood building?

(OP)
I have a four story wood structure with brick veneer. The veneer height exceeds 30 feet, so we are going to support the brick veneer at each level with shelf angles. I was wondering how people typically detail the connection of the shelf angle back to wood-framed buildings.

Let's say I have maximum 12' of supported brick at 39 psf = 468 plf. The center of brick veneer will have about a 3 1/4" eccentricity from the face of the sheathing, so 468x3.25 = 1521 lb-in/ft moment. I was planning on using an L5X5X3/8 angle. What's the preferred way to attach it back to the structure? (1) row of lag screws into solid blocking between the wall studs? I'm getting that I need 3/4" lag screws at 8" o.c. to take the combined shear and withdrawal loading. I was planning on locating this angle and blocking right above the wall bottom plate, so gravity loads will be transferred through direct bearing. How do you transfer the tension of the moment couple out of the blocking into the wood studs?

RE: How to anchor brick shelf angles to a wood building?

My vote would be on through bolting the angle to the rim joist at the floor platform. a big fat washer, even custom made from 3/16" thick steel on the inside face. lag bolts only have so much thread, and if the wood gets wet its a recipe for distaster.

RE: How to anchor brick shelf angles to a wood building?

If you have to attach it to wood, then through bolting is the way to go... Careful, your loads can be high and wood generally 'creeps'. If a cold environment, for thermal movement, keep your shelf angles 10' to 15' long... and also watch for thermal transfer and condensation on the inside.

Dik

RE: How to anchor brick shelf angles to a wood building?

I would not attach the lintel to wood blocking between studs - that is a recipe for disaster. Attach it to the floor band only with thru bolts if you must use this detail as NorhtCivil stated. If you are using I-joists, make sure your band is at least an LVL - may 2-ply. I despise this detail. My guess is that the wood ends up creeping and rotating in practice until the lintel bears on the brick below and so on and so on.
Seems there should be a better way of dealing with 4 stories of brick.

RE: How to anchor brick shelf angles to a wood building?

I would consider not supporting the brick on wood and keeping everything supported by the foundation.

Estimate your wood shrinkage and brick expansion and have your architect detail their window sills for this differential at the upper levels.

I believe the 30ft limit is prescriptive, but don't have the code in front of me.

RE: How to anchor brick shelf angles to a wood building?

I should have added that some codes exclude wood as a means of masonry support.

Dik

RE: How to anchor brick shelf angles to a wood building?

Quote (GerryBertier)

I would consider not supporting the brick on wood and keeping everything supported by the foundation.

Estimate your wood shrinkage and brick expansion and have your architect detail their window sills for this differential at the upper levels.

I believe the 30ft limit is prescriptive, but don't have the code in front of me.

I was told that the brick expands the most when it is young as it is very dry when it comes out of the kiln. There ought to be a way to let it acclimate to some degree which would minimize the expansion.

https://ascelibrary.org/doi/abs/10.1061/41016%2831...

RE: How to anchor brick shelf angles to a wood building?

(OP)
I don't have an ASCE account in order to access that report that XR250 linked to, but the abstract for it brings up a good point. "The expected differential movement when using sawn lumber is 1.70 in. (4.32 cm) for a 30 ft. (9.1 m) exterior wall. If the floor joists are switched to LVL spruce-pine I-joists, similar differential movement (1.59 in., 4.04 cm) can be obtained by going up to a 50 ft. (15.2 m) wall." I assume that 30 foot prescriptive limit was developed based on dimensional lumber floor framing. I am using I-joists/LVLs for floor framing and have a total height of brick veneer less than 50', so I'm tempted to go GerryBertier's route of supporting all the brick off the foundation. That being said, 1.70 in. seems like a large amount of differential movement.


I found this link from the Brick Industry Association that seems to be recommending supporting brick veneer in excess of 30 feet all from the foundation:
http://www.gobrick.com/Portals/25/docs/Publication...

However, I also found the following link from woodworks that to me seems to be recommending supporting the veneer at each floor level on the upper levels:
http://www.woodworks.org/wp-content/uploads/Option...

Any issue with cross-grain bending in the rimboard/LVLs when bolting the eccentric brick load to the face?

RE: How to anchor brick shelf angles to a wood building?

I have never seen anywhere near 1.7" of delta in this situation. Must be expected if the lumber is not kiln dried or has been rained on for a week and the brick is fresh out of the plant.

Red Flag This Post

Please let us know here why this post is inappropriate. Reasons such as off-topic, duplicates, flames, illegal, vulgar, or students posting their homework.

Red Flag Submitted

Thank you for helping keep Eng-Tips Forums free from inappropriate posts.
The Eng-Tips staff will check this out and take appropriate action.

Reply To This Thread

Posting in the Eng-Tips forums is a member-only feature.

Click Here to join Eng-Tips and talk with other members! Already a Member? Login


Resources

Low-Volume Rapid Injection Molding With 3D Printed Molds
Learn methods and guidelines for using stereolithography (SLA) 3D printed molds in the injection molding process to lower costs and lead time. Discover how this hybrid manufacturing process enables on-demand mold fabrication to quickly produce small batches of thermoplastic parts. Download Now
Design for Additive Manufacturing (DfAM)
Examine how the principles of DfAM upend many of the long-standing rules around manufacturability - allowing engineers and designers to place a part’s function at the center of their design considerations. Download Now
Taking Control of Engineering Documents
This ebook covers tips for creating and managing workflows, security best practices and protection of intellectual property, Cloud vs. on-premise software solutions, CAD file management, compliance, and more. Download Now

Close Box

Join Eng-Tips® Today!

Join your peers on the Internet's largest technical engineering professional community.
It's easy to join and it's free.

Here's Why Members Love Eng-Tips Forums:

Register now while it's still free!

Already a member? Close this window and log in.

Join Us             Close