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Comparing small footprint dewatering systems - for wastewater or brewery waste
2

Comparing small footprint dewatering systems - for wastewater or brewery waste

Comparing small footprint dewatering systems - for wastewater or brewery waste

(OP)
I am considering using one of two small-footprint methods for dewatering a ferment solid. The material is not unlike beer mash, and I was wondering if anybody here has experience with either type of equipment.

The first method would incorporate a rotary drum thickener with a circular filter screen on the outside diameter. The solids are pumped in, and the rotation draws the water to the outer compartment which is then drained.

The second method uses a vibratory screen to shake the solids along a conveyor. The bottom of the conveyor is composed of perforated stainless steel, and the shaking motion retains the solids on top while allowing the water to drain out from a port.

RE: Comparing small footprint dewatering systems - for wastewater or brewery waste

In a similar application (disillery mash) a filter screw press was used ().
These are also commonly used for slurry, just need to find a manufacturer that can also make them in food grade.

Capture rate for TS is around 40-50%, I don't know if this is acceptable to you.

I don't think the screen will work very well. I think some mechanical pressure is neccessary to squeeze your mash. Similar doubts about the drum thickener.

RE: Comparing small footprint dewatering systems - for wastewater or brewery waste

Your selection will be governed by how dry you want the solids and what capture rate is acceptable.
Neither of the processes you mention will get the cake very dry. I would be surprised if you would do much better than 5% solids (as in still 95% water).

I agree with MartinLe you will have to have something that applies pressure eg: filter screw press, centrifuge , belt filter press just to name a couple.

Regards
Ashtree
"Any water can be made potable if you filter it through enough money"

RE: Comparing small footprint dewatering systems - for wastewater or brewery waste

Look at filter press.

It is a capital mistake to theorise before one has data. Insensibly one begins to twist facts to suit theories, instead of theories to suit facts. (Sherlock Holmes - A Scandal in Bohemia.)

RE: Comparing small footprint dewatering systems - for wastewater or brewery waste

-Your second option is not unlike what is used to remove solids from dairy flush water waste. I have a client that uses them. They seems to work ok. Do a search for dairy manure separator screen. I'm sure this isn't exactly what you are looking for, but it might give you an idea of the end product. Waste typically goes in at 95-98% liquid. A lot of solids end up at the bottom end of the screen. Water is sent to runoff retention ponds. I agree a press would be better.

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