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Engineer of Record no longer employed with firm....

Engineer of Record no longer employed with firm....

Engineer of Record no longer employed with firm....

(OP)
If the engineer who sealed project drawings is no longer employed with the company, and drawing revisions are made that require re-stamping, is it required that the original engineer (EOR) stamp the revisions or can another engineer stamp?

RE: Engineer of Record no longer employed with firm....

The short answer is that, yes - another engineer can stamp the revision to a drawing.

One fact to note is that many states now require the engineer of record to observe construction of the design - if that engineer is no longer with the company, they can't be the one to make those observations. I would recommend you confirm what the requirements are for the state you're performing work in and ensure you (and your company) are maintaining compliance with the law governing PE seals. In some cases, a simple notification on the change in engineer performing the observation is acceptable - in other cases, the new engineer of record will need to re-stamp the applicable drawings to go on record as officially performing the observation.

RE: Engineer of Record no longer employed with firm....

(OP)
Thanks for the input folks.
I have inquires into several State Boards and will advise when I hear back.

RE: Engineer of Record no longer employed with firm....

In Florida, a new engineer can stamp revised stamped drawings, but he may have to show that he has performed all calculations including the old, existing work. The question is whether this actually happens.

RE: Engineer of Record no longer employed with firm....

Hey Toad...

Good to hear from you again!

Mike McCann, PE, SE (WA)


RE: Engineer of Record no longer employed with firm....

(OP)
Oh boy, I think its been years!

RE: Engineer of Record no longer employed with firm....

In NY, on our state and local DOT projects, another engineer can alter a drawing BUT he/she has to stamp it and annotate it. Also, the original engineer's stamp must be present.

RE: Engineer of Record no longer employed with firm....

Quote:


One fact to note is that many states now require the engineer of record to observe construction of the design....

Which states? I'm not sure I've heard of this before. (I've certainly heard of inspection requirements.)

RE: Engineer of Record no longer employed with firm....

WARose,

One such example is the state of Hawaii - currently working on a project there.

RE: Engineer of Record no longer employed with firm....

Quote:

One such example is the state of Hawaii - currently working on a project there.

Interesting. Are we talking periodic site visits or out there throughout the process? The latter would be just about impossible for me. (I'm self-employed.)

RE: Engineer of Record no longer employed with firm....

To quote the Hawaii Administrative Rule 16-115:

""Observation of construction" means making and documenting visits to the site by a licensed engineer, architect, landscape architect, or qualified representatives working under the supervision of a licensed engineer, architect, or landscape architect, as the case may require, to observe the progress and quality of the executed work and to determine, in general, if the work is proceeding in accordance with the contract documents. It is not required that they make exhaustive or continuous on-site observations to check the quality or quantity of work nor is it intended that the engineer, architect, or landscape architect be responsible for construction means, methods, techniques, sequences, or procedures, or for safety precautions and programs in connection with the work."

No continuous presence required - additionally, as stated above, allowance is made for "qualified representatives" under the supervision of the PE to make the necessary construction observations, as well. No criteria is given for what makes someone qualified - so that responsibility seems to rest on the PE in charge of the observation.

RE: Engineer of Record no longer employed with firm....

Interesting. Somewhat nebulous as to what is actually required by these visits. Thanks for the info.

RE: Engineer of Record no longer employed with firm....

it appears that the observation can be done by either the engineer of record or by another engineer.

Quote (Hawaii)

(b) In addition to the requirements of subsection (a), when applications
are made for building or construction permits involving public safety or health, all
plans and specifications in connection therewith shall bear the authorized seal or
stamp of the duly licensed professional engineer, architect, or landscape architect
charged with observation of construction pursuant to sections 464-4 and 464-5,
HRS. Below the seal or stamp, the authentication shall state "Construction of this
project will be under my observation", be signed by the licensee, and state the
expiration date of the license

RE: Engineer of Record no longer employed with firm....

In Texas the ultimate liability for the design lies with the firm. If an EOR leaves the firm and changes are made to the plans the original engineer's seal must be removed and a new EOR employed by the firm must seal and take responsible charge for anything on the sheet, not just the changes.

RE: Engineer of Record no longer employed with firm....

WARose, in Hawaii the general approach is that they want the EOR a little more involved during construction than seems to be typical on the mainland outside of some high seismic/wind requirements. Doesn't need to be continuous but seems like a fair amount of the mainland work I've seen and been involved with had engineers pretty well butt out during construction. EOR will respond to submittal reviews and RFIs and maybe make a site visit or two but otherwise contractor is out doing their own thing.

The way we've approached it with our Hawaii work is to actually go out to job sites a little more often and generally be more available to contractor than seems to be the norm elsewhere to help address unforeseen or unique conditions, identify and mitigate deficiencies, etc. Instead of contractor feeling like they're out building on their own, we try to provide support so they actually ask questions and bring up issues instead of just winging it (though some are stubborn and still just wing it).

I think most engineers and contractors would agree that having EOR more involved during construction is probably beneficial, main issue is getting owners to buy in and actually pay for it. To avoid that issue, Hawaii takes it out of owners' hands and just requires it.

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