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Even worse water

Even worse water

RE: Even worse water

And here I thought the article was going to be about the water supply for the capital building...

John R. Baker, P.E. (ret)
EX-Product 'Evangelist'
Irvine, CA
Siemens PLM:
UG/NX Museum:

The secret of life is not finding someone to live with
It's finding someone you can't live without

RE: Even worse water

Yeah. Naegleria fowleri is seriously bad-ass stuff. Interestingly you can drink it with no hazard at all but sniff one up your nose and you're on the 99% death rate train. Far worse than Ebola (~50%) The biggest problem is not recognizing the attack in time because it manifests as a cold with a headache days after the event.

Years ago about a week after the first case of NF hit the public media my wife jumped out of the car and dove into a pond in the Angeles National Forest. As we drove off later we saw a bio-hazard sign posted on the other side that was a Naegleria fowleri warning. She dodged the bullet somehow.

I think the Louisiana Dept of Health is on the ball and writes a clear succinct knowledgeable usable notice. I'm impressed. I hope Flint Michigan takes note.

NF gets into those rambling warm wettish state water supplies frequently.

Keith Cress
kcress - http://www.flaminsystems.com

RE: Even worse water

Regarding: I think the Louisiana Dept of Health is on the ball and writes a clear succinct knowledgeable usable notice. I'm impressed. I hope Flint Michigan takes note.

Have to disagree with that opinion.

1. This situation was caused by improper operation of private potable water systems, in specific, a lack of chlorine residual disinfectant.

"The location where the amoeba was found did not meet the chlorine level the state has required since late 2013 to ensure it is safe from the amoeba, according to the statement. It said the system was tested for the amoeba in August because the North Monroe Water System had failed to meet that disinfectant level.

"Three other sites on the system tested negative for Naegleria fowleri, although two of these did not meet the requirement for the minimum disinfectant residual level," it said."

2. The Louisiana Dept of Health should be "requiring", not "asking" as in "The Department asked the water system to convert the disinfection method to the free chlorine method for a period of 60 days to ensure that any remaining ameba in the system are eliminated."

3. It appears that the Louisiana Dept of Health took a CDC swimming advisory and converted it into a potable water advisory. There is no rational for doing that:

"The only certain way to prevent a Naegleria fowleri infection due to swimming is to refrain from water-related activities in warm freshwater. Personal actions to reduce the risk of Naegleria fowleri infection should focus on limiting the amount of water going up the nose.

These actions could include:
•Hold your nose shut, use nose clips, or keep your head above water when taking part in water-related activities in bodies of warm freshwater.
•Avoid putting your head under the water in hot springs and other untreated thermal waters.
•Avoid water-related activities in warm freshwater during periods of high water temperature.
•Avoid digging in, or stirring up, the sediment while taking part in water-related activities in shallow, warm freshwater areas.

These recommendations make common sense but are not based on any scientific testing since the low numbers of infections make it difficult to ever show that they are effective."

https://www.cdc.gov/parasites/naegleria/swimming.h...

4. Note that last line: "These recommendations make common sense but are not based on any scientific testing since the low numbers of infections make it difficult to ever show that they are effective."

5. Since the water is not being properly treated, who knows what else is in the potable water. The bacteria that causes Legionnaires disease thrives in the same conditions. The Legionnaires disease outbreak in Flint was also caused by lack of disinfection and warm water during the summer.

6. Since the potable water systems are being superchlorinated, the notice should also have a warning about excess chlorine.


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