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Engine and turbine

Engine and turbine

Engine and turbine

(OP)
I normally pronounce engine as n-gin and turbine as tur-byne.

I had a lecturer in Uni who used to pronounce engine as n-gyne and turbine as tur-bin. That was about 30 years ago and all the students thought he was a bit strange with these non-standard pronunciations. I recently watched a news-clip on Rolls-Royce aero engines from the late-40s, early-50s. The engineers and reporters were saying n-gyne and tur-bin. I don't know whether they still pronounce it that way in Rolls-Royce nowadays. I'm just wondering when the pronunciation switched because all the engineers I talk to say n-gin and tur-byne.

Turbine comes from Latin turbinem. I'm just wondering whether the Brits no longer pronounce turbine as turbin because hardly anyone does Latin. I know the Americans still say tur-bin (or at least that's what http://dictionary.cambridge.org/pronunciation/brit... says and that is what they tend to say in the US movies, unless it is a Brit acting).

RE: Engine and turbine

As a 50 year old Brit...

Never hear it called anything else but an N-Gin (not true - when I was starting out, I sometimes heard the old codgers - ie those who were probably as old then as I am now - calling them In-Gins)

Heard both forms of Turbine fairly often. Tur-Bin maybe more often in the context of steam and the power industry, Tur-byne maybe more often in the context of gas turbines and aviation.

A.

RE: Engine and turbine

zeus,
N-Gin and In-Gin sound the same to me.

RE: Engine and turbine

I'm also with zeus on this. (Not quite 50 yet, but Brit)

- Steve

RE: Engine and turbine

Hokie,

N-Gin rhymes roughly with "Ten gins" as opposed to In-Gin which is closer to "Tinned gin".

A.

RE: Engine and turbine

Must be my accent. I fail to see the difference. I pronounce ten and tin the same.

RE: Engine and turbine

How do you say pen & pin? They are not the same to me but around here many say them the same.

----------------------------------------

The Help for this program was created in Windows Help format, which depends on a feature that isn't included in this version of Windows.

RE: Engine and turbine

Depends on where you are from more than where you live. Most people who grew up in the US southern states will pronounce those words the same.

RE: Engine and turbine

Well you have the Brits and the Yanks, now for the true blue, fair dinkum Aussie pronunciation, it's en-gin (as in the drink gin) and ter-byne (as in tyne).

It is a capital mistake to theorise before one has data. Insensibly one begins to twist facts to suit theories, instead of theories to suit facts. (Sherlock Holmes - A Scandal in Bohemia.)

RE: Engine and turbine

(OP)
Which part of Oz is that? My brother-in-law comes from Queensland and he tends to say in-gin instead of en-gin.

RE: Engine and turbine

I wonder how they pronounce those words in sith efrica.

It could be worse. We English-speaking cousins at least agree on the spellings.

- Steve

RE: Engine and turbine

I once noticed warning “No smocking, stop motor” on BP gas station, so for some reason I assumed that’s how Brits spell “engine”. smile

RE: Engine and turbine

Well, it is a motor car, not an engine car.

----------------------------------------

The Help for this program was created in Windows Help format, which depends on a feature that isn't included in this version of Windows.

RE: Engine and turbine

But what is it about "smocking" which would be dangerous to do near a gas pump?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Smocking

John R. Baker, P.E.
Product 'Evangelist'
Product Engineering Software
Siemens PLM Software Inc.
Industry Sector
Cypress, CA
Siemens PLM:
UG/NX Museum:

To an Engineer, the glass is twice as big as it needs to be.

RE: Engine and turbine

They just don't want the kind of people who wear smocking kicking around - lowers the whole tone of the place.

RE: Engine and turbine

... it attracts smirking too.

- Steve

RE: Engine and turbine

(OP)
Was that at a BP station in the US? There are very few petrol stations in the UK that sell gas/LPG.

I've also seen "Do not use your Mobil phone" in a remote village Chevron petrol station. Were they worried about the competition?

RE: Engine and turbine

(OP)
It is probably based on old phones which used doorbell circuitry for the ringing. That may have caused sparks within the casing so something like gas could be ignited. Since petrol vapour is denser than air, the phone would probably have to be ringing on the floor before it would cause a spark.

It is probably to make life easier for the forecourt staff - people refuelling while on the phone and not paying attention and spilling petrol all over the forecourt or spilling petrol on their phones and possibly melting the plastic. If they don't have to clean up spills because there aren't any, and some idiot doesn't try to sue them for petrol melting their phone, then it makes life easier.

RE: Engine and turbine

Not a pronunciation issue, rather a spelling mistake, but I still get the giggles when I see 'wind turban'.

RE: Engine and turbine

one of these?

RE: Engine and turbine

Context is everything, which is why I find it so funny, but more like this: .

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