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None too vs Not

None too vs Not

None too vs Not

(OP)
Can someone help me understand the difference between the two?

Found in article:
"While this is good news for travelers, airlines are none too happy with it."

Why not this:
"While this is good news for travelers, airlines are not happy with it."

______________________________________________________________________________
This is normally the space where people post something insightful.

RE: None too vs Not

You're right.  The two are the same.  Or maybe "not too" to preserve all of the meaning.

I've seen "none to __" before, but it's been either in dialect (American South, maybe?) or archaic.

I'd say it's acceptable in informal writing, especially if the article has a conversational tone.  Not acceptable for technical writing, though.

RE: None too vs Not

The first sarcastically suggests the airlines are somewhat happy, just not overly so. The second is much more straight forward.

RE: None too vs Not

i think the 1st says that the airlines were really pi$$ed.

as above either sentence is ok (by me, FWIW).

RE: None too vs Not

"none too ...." crops up in English English too - again as a compact way of saying "not at all ...... - in fact quite the opposite"

A.  

RE: None too vs Not

"None too happy" equates to "not very happy" in my understanding so "not happy" is less happy than "none too happy".

Or possibly just another typical British English understatement.

Stephen Argles
Land & Marine
www.landandmarine.com

RE: None too vs Not

English is imprecise. Statements like this should be made in Latin. For example, what is the difference between these two terse phrases?

magnus cole de Canis.
cole de magnus Canis.

- Steve
 

RE: None too vs Not

zeusfaber has hit the money!

In British English, "none too ..." is used as means of expressing sarcasm in an understated way. It may be one of those expressions that doesn't cross the Atlantic. E.g. "My wife was none too impressed when I gave her a chainsaw for our wedding anniversary." (Your wife may react differently, depending on her hobbies and interests!)

"not happy" is a plain statement of not being happy (but not necessarily really unhappy)

"none too happy"  implies really unhappy, not just "not happy"

http://julianh72.blogspot.com  

RE: None too vs Not

No doubt the article was sent overseas for editing. One would have to read the full article (or at least the paragraph) to get the real intent of the sentence.

Garth Dreger PE - AZ Phoenix area
As EOR's we should take the responsibility to design our structures to support the components we allow in our design per that industry standards.

RE: None too vs Not

No need to read the full article, just believe zeus & jhardy that it is a British English turn of phrase.

There is plenty of doubt if the article was sent overseas for editing, all depends on your frame of reference.  The article may well have been written by someone from a region where this turn of phrase is common.

There are plenty of native English speakers that aren't citizens/residents the USA.  

Heck, some claim the language may have even originated outside of the US which is somewhat mind blowing.

Posting guidelines FAQ731-376: Eng-Tips.com Forum Policies http://eng-tips.com/market.cfm? (probably not aimed specifically at you)
What is Engineering anyway: FAQ1088-1484: In layman terms, what is "engineering"?

RE: None too vs Not

I don't find the phrase to be especially British. Englishman Henry Fonda playing Englishman Tom Joad used it in the Grapes of Wrath: "Sure don't look none too prosperous."

RE: None too vs Not

Intonation is everything in the weak language we use, called English. Spoken can have totally different meaning to written.

There are some nice examples of it on Jimmy's (is it up or down?) web site.
 

- Steve
 

RE: None too vs Not

"Sure don't look none too prosperous."

Now that's a phrase that's bound to confuse someone who has English as a second language - jut try and analyse it using the rules of grammar to work out what it means!

http://julianh72.blogspot.com  

RE: None too vs Not

"Intonation is everything in the weak language we use, called English. Spoken can have totally different meaning to written. "

Reminds me of a joke I heard some time back:

The English teacher was explaining to the class that double negatives cancel each other out, leading to a positive response, but that two positives reinforce each other rather than cancelling each other out; that is, two positives don't make a negative.

Little Johnny at the back of the class responded sarcastically: "Yeah ... right!"

(You have to say it properly to get the joke!)

 

http://julianh72.blogspot.com  

RE: None too vs Not

"We aim to please"

On a sign above a toilet.

- Steve
 

RE: None too vs Not

I think that, in older days, a double negative was used to reinforce it, rather then to negate it.
Can't think of an example in English, but I know it was that way in Dutch, and I'm pretty sure it still is like that in South African.  

NX 7.5
Teamcenter 8

RE: None too vs Not

Really? You can't think a none in English?

RE: None too vs Not

Quote (stevenal):

Really? You can't think a none in English?

I'm not really sure what that means.

NX 7.5
Teamcenter 8

RE: None too vs Not

Translation from colloquial to formal:
"Really? You can't think of any?"

RE: None too vs Not

SomptingGuy the rest of the sign says:

"You aim too, please."

Regards,

Mike

RE: None too vs Not

Quote (jhardy1):

"I can't get no satisfaction"

Ain't no sunshine when she's gone.

NX 7.5
Teamcenter 8

RE: None too vs Not

"We don't need no education"

(Note to Alanis Morissette: Now _THAT'S_ irony!)

This is fun! Maybe a topic for a new thread of it's own?

(Off-topic, but I just gotta gloat: I saw Roger Waters performing "The Wall" last night - wow! What a show! See it, if it is coming to a town near you!)

http://julianh72.blogspot.com  

RE: None too vs Not

I like you second phrase in your OP.  The first phrase is too verbose  or flowery.

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