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Misuse / misquotes of phrases and sayings
10

Misuse / misquotes of phrases and sayings

Misuse / misquotes of phrases and sayings

(OP)
I was just called as a reference check on a former co-worker and after getting off the phone I remembered how much fun I had teasing him while working together.  He was a bright individual, but had some issues getting quotes, phrases, and sayings wrong as well as certain quirks in how he communicated things.  


Here is my favorite...

"That's a classic catch 1 2..."

Some of his quirks...
inside of, instead of inside
spin up, instead of rotate
correctuality (yes, he actually said that word), instead of accuracy

Oh... my most hated.... about every other word was followed by a low throat grunt... kind of reminded me of an "I have to pooh real bad" grunt...

Anyone else have someone they work with who has any of these issues?  It brings tears to my eyes from laughter just thinking of the good times....


 

Cabbages, knickers, It hasn't got A BEAK!

RE: Misuse / misquotes of phrases and sayings

I've been told a few times by a supervisor that "It's not like this is rocket surgery!"

Presumably the offspring of a rocket scientist and a brain surgeon.

RE: Misuse / misquotes of phrases and sayings

Supposively rather than supposedly.
Walla rather than voila.

RE: Misuse / misquotes of phrases and sayings

Penultimate being used to mean "the ultimate" sticks in my craw.

RE: Misuse / misquotes of phrases and sayings

One of the TV channels in the UK (ITV4) is showing reruns of the classic 80's show: "Minder".  The main character in this show gets all of his sayings wrong, which has me in stitches (e.g. "The world is your lobster.")

- Steve

RE: Misuse / misquotes of phrases and sayings

(OP)
If any of you have seen either of the "Boondock Saints" movies, you will remember the bartender with turrets... Same thing...

"People in glass houses sink ships"
"A penny saved is worth two in the bush"

etc...


I have always had this unique annoyance about me.  If I notice someone keeps repeating something, says it wrong, or misquotes... It's like all I can do is focus on that one thing...

I had a professor in college with a speech impediment... Biew instead of view, and he would repeatedly say "See here now"... I could never focus on school...

Cabbages, knickers, It hasn't got A BEAK!

RE: Misuse / misquotes of phrases and sayings

Isn't this along the lines of what's called 'spoonerisms'?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Spoonerism

The comedian, Jackie Mason, has made a career out of this, and if anyone is a fan of the TV show NCIS, for the Ziva David character, it's a running schtick.

John R. Baker, P.E.
Product 'Evangelist'
Product Design Solutions
Siemens PLM Software Inc.
Industry Sector
Cypress, CA
http://www.siemens.com/plm
http://www.plmworld.org/museum/

To an Engineer, the glass is twice as big as it needs to be.
 

RE: Misuse / misquotes of phrases and sayings

Spoonerism can be unintentional as  British national treasure and long time news anchor Sir Trevor McDonald discovered to his embarrassment on prime-time TV.  He meant to say "Kent countryside" but spoonerised it, paused, apologised and then said it correctly.

- Steve

RE: Misuse / misquotes of phrases and sayings

Don't get me started.  I had a boss a couple of years ago that did this all the time.  I really didn't notice until he called my attention to it.  Once I started keeping track, others began offering their contributions.  Six years later, and I now have a list of over 260 of mangled sayings and cliches.  They have to be unintentional to be included.  Some people now notice whenever I write something down during a meeting.  Sometimes the speaker will stop and ask what he just said.

Some of the better ones have made it into our common office venacular, like the "forty-pound gorilla" or trying to "circumvent the wheel."  As far as those listed in the OP, ours was a "Catch 2."


 

RE: Misuse / misquotes of phrases and sayings

"Irregardless" is not a word - but a lot of people use it.

This guy may also have a mild form of Tourette's - the grunting sort of gives it away.

He may be struggling to get every word out.   

RE: Misuse / misquotes of phrases and sayings

The "rocket surgery" one is done by many (including myself) deliberately - It's quite a common gag, similar to "does the Pope s**t in the woods?"

A colleauge of mine said recently, "That's a whole new can of mole hills", simultaneaously confusing "whole new kettle of fish", "can of worms" and "mountains out of molehills". However it fitted the situation perfectly.

M

--
Dr Michael F Platten

RE: Misuse / misquotes of phrases and sayings

i had a japanese physics teacher who used to always say 'I can hear you smiling!'

RE: Misuse / misquotes of phrases and sayings

It's a mute point.

RE: Misuse / misquotes of phrases and sayings

I had a boss with the double 'is' problem, and he occasionally would get stuck on it and throw out a triple 'is'. "my thought on this is, is that I was right to begin with."  Disirregardless. I pointedly use the word penultimate all the time to refer to the second best just so someone else will use it wrong and I can ask them. If that is the penultimate solution what is the best one?  I have my own issues though so I've stopped pointing out other peoples.

Those who live in glass houses shouldn't text while driving.   

RE: Misuse / misquotes of phrases and sayings

use it wrongly
missing comma after final "though"
peoples'

- Steve

RE: Misuse / misquotes of phrases and sayings

gadkinsj,
Just so you get your misdirection correct, penultimate doesn't mean "second best".  It means "second last".

RE: Misuse / misquotes of phrases and sayings

One reason for saying things like these is to see if people are really listening.

I kind of like "it's water over the bridge now" or alternatively "it's water under the dam".

Regards,

Mike
  

RE: Misuse / misquotes of phrases and sayings

I think the proper definition is 'Next to Last', at least that's what it says in my Webster's.

John R. Baker, P.E.
Product 'Evangelist'
Product Design Solutions
Siemens PLM Software Inc.
Industry Sector
Cypress, CA
http://www.siemens.com/plm
http://www.plmworld.org/museum/

To an Engineer, the glass is twice as big as it needs to be.
 

RE: Misuse / misquotes of phrases and sayings

"My sister did similar when the 'Chief Constable of Kent' visited her facility"

Do you remember we used to have a Home Secretary who always pronounced it that way (in between describing his ex-colleagues as crimi-nulls)?

A

RE: Misuse / misquotes of phrases and sayings

'Er indoors always uses "suffice" when it should be "sufficient" and "windowscreen" in place of "windscreen".

- Steve

RE: Misuse / misquotes of phrases and sayings

Two words;
im-possible

RE: Misuse / misquotes of phrases and sayings

Simpsons:

Me fail english that's unpossible!

RE: Misuse / misquotes of phrases and sayings

Quote "One of the TV channels in the UK (ITV4) is showing reruns of the classic 80's show: "Minder".  The main character in this show gets all of his sayings wrong, which has me in stitches (e.g. "The world is your lobster.") EOQ

Sorry to disabuse you SomtingGuy but the character you are refering to is Derek (Delboy) Trotter played by David Jason in "Only Fools and Horses".

RE: Misuse / misquotes of phrases and sayings

Nope, I'm refering to Arfur.  Del Boy does it too, but not so well.  Only Fools and Horses was designed as a comedy.  Minder became one unintentionally.

- Steve

RE: Misuse / misquotes of phrases and sayings

I've always loved the word antepenultimate, which is of course the next to the next to the last, or third from the end.  And I my self make errors on occasion.  I was corrected for prounoucing the term quixotic (kwik-sot-ik) as (key-haw-tik) which is how it seems it should be pronounced based on it's origin from don Quixote (key-ho-tee).  But I don't mind being wrong, especially when someone is there to correct me.

-Kirby

Kirby Wilkerson

Remember, first define the problem, then solve it.

RE: Misuse / misquotes of phrases and sayings

@KirbyWan:
And then of course there's preantepenultimate (not sure what comes before that)

RE: Misuse / misquotes of phrases and sayings

We must have purpose.
We must'nt be purposeless.
We must'nt exhibit purposelessness.
We must be purposelessnessless.

(From Rowan, when he was funny.  Before Bean took over.)

- Steve

RE: Misuse / misquotes of phrases and sayings

The window for good ideas has closed.

RE: Misuse / misquotes of phrases and sayings

I love using the rocket surgery one.  I'm gonna have to start using the can of mole hills.  Another one that I always seem to get people with is referring to the guzintas and guzoutas of a system.  The guzintas, of course, is where material enters.  

I wrote guzintas and guzoutas on some pipes that I had installed in my house, and the home inspector (according to my wife) stopped and looked at them for 15 or 20 minutes, examined what they were connected to, looked at them a while longer, then eventually grinned, laughed out loud, and walked away shaking his head.


 

RE: Misuse / misquotes of phrases and sayings

SomtingGuy - thanks for putting me right.  I was working in Italy in the 80s and 90s so never saw Minder.

RE: Misuse / misquotes of phrases and sayings

@GrahamBennett

I used to find the Arfur character really despicable when I watched Minder the first time round, 30 years ago.  Now I need to wear adult diapers when I watch it.  As a kid I wept over the sh1t that Terry was regularly dealt (Arfur always buys a large VAT for himself, a half of lager for Terry, both on the slate), now I see his character as comic genius.

ITV4, a few times a week.  Or get a box set.

- Steve

RE: Misuse / misquotes of phrases and sayings

Best ever Minder quote:

"Interplod"

(From "Minder on the Orient Express")

- Steve

RE: Misuse / misquotes of phrases and sayings

Regarding the use of "penultimate," check out the comic strip "Frazz" beginning June 6, 2011.  

RE: Misuse / misquotes of phrases and sayings

I have always thought that penultimate meant 'second from the end'.  For a series of objects, there are two ends, so there are two penultimate objects.

BA

RE: Misuse / misquotes of phrases and sayings

Maybe, but it doesn't mean second from the beginning.

RE: Misuse / misquotes of phrases and sayings

Recently, I was at a graduation dinner for a sudent association at the local university.  The MC (who had just graduated) kept introducing speakers with the phrase "without further to do..." instead of "without further ado".  She must have said it at least a dozen times.

RE: Misuse / misquotes of phrases and sayings

I'm just trying to decide which is worse...to do or ado.  I have always disliked that expression.

BA

RE: Misuse / misquotes of phrases and sayings

I read "misdenomer" in these fora today.  Is that a real word, or a bad hybrid?

- Steve

RE: Misuse / misquotes of phrases and sayings

I think I read that too, but can't remember where.  I believe it should have been "misnomer".

BA

RE: Misuse / misquotes of phrases and sayings

(OP)
Oooh... Oooh I heard a great one today.  We had a CAD guy come in for a test to see if we wanted to contract him.  One of the senior guys who grades the test said "I will not capsize you for an incorrect model, I just want to see your methodology"

I believe he meant chastise....

Cabbages, knickers, It hasn't got A BEAK!

RE: Misuse / misquotes of phrases and sayings

Depends on whether you were looking for someone specializing in CAD software for naval architecture or not winky smile

John R. Baker, P.E.
Product 'Evangelist'
Product Design Solutions
Siemens PLM Software Inc.
Industry Sector
Cypress, CA
http://www.siemens.com/plm
http://www.plmworld.org/museum/

To an Engineer, the glass is twice as big as it needs to be.
 

RE: Misuse / misquotes of phrases and sayings

In my part of the country if you ask someone to do something and they and they have no objection to doing it, they will respond with "I don't care to."  

RE: Misuse / misquotes of phrases and sayings

Care must be a tricky word.  Where I come from, when offered something to eat, instead of saying "no thank you", it is common to say "I don't care for any".  My wife has pulled me up on that a few times, as she thinks it is rude.

RE: Misuse / misquotes of phrases and sayings

Mrs. hokie is a smart lady.

BA

RE: Misuse / misquotes of phrases and sayings

I'll tell her you said so, and then she'll never let me forget it.

RE: Misuse / misquotes of phrases and sayings

Hokie,
Best not to then.

My wife always uses those overpolite roundabout english phrases that really get up my goat because there is no certainty to them. I prefer direct statements like 'no thank you' as there is no room for uncertainty.

One example of this is saying 'would you like a piece of cake' instead of saying can you get me a piece of cake. When I say no thanks, she still expects me to get hers.

I cannot seem to think of a better example but I will post one when I can.

RE: Misuse / misquotes of phrases and sayings


Where I was reared, it was common to say, "if you don't mind" when requesting approval of a potential action or statement/question etc.

That was in Southern California, USA.  In the state of Kentucky, I heard it as, "if you don't care."  That sounded strange to me at first and I wanted to say, "but of course I care" but I didn't say it.  "If you don't care" still sounds strange to me and yet it seems so colloquial it has a bit of charm about it.

There is that word "care" again.  Take care how you interpret these sayings.

RE: Misuse / misquotes of phrases and sayings

I taught fluids lab last semester, and my kids complained about the guy doing the fluid mechs lecture. Apparently he always said, "this isn't rocket science," and the students were like "but, um, it kinda is rocket science isn't it?"

 

Hydrology, Drainage Analysis, Flood Studies, and Complex Stormwater Litigation for Atlanta and the South East - http://www.campbellcivil.com

RE: Misuse / misquotes of phrases and sayings

Quote:

I taught fluids lab last semester, and my kids complained about the guy doing the fluid mechs lecture. Apparently he always said, "this isn't rocket science," and the students were like "but, um, it kinda is rocket science isn't it?"

lol. def. out of place as it is related. But there are some grad courses you can take that are specifically on rockets. Does involve a lot of fluid mechanics, thermo, and heat transfer.  

peace
Fe

RE: Misuse / misquotes of phrases and sayings

Today I learend its not a mute point but rather a moot point.

knowledge is power

RE: Misuse / misquotes of phrases and sayings

I remember a SNL (Saturday Night Live) skit when The Rev Jessie Jackson guest-hosted the show called "the question is moot".  Very funny, and how I learned the meaning of the word moot.

-Kirby

Kirby Wilkerson

Remember, first define the problem, then solve it.

RE: Misuse / misquotes of phrases and sayings

cdxx139....but....

If knowledge is power; and
power corrupts;
Would it be better to remain ignorant?

RE: Misuse / misquotes of phrases and sayings

"It's a moo point, like when a cow has an opinion. The point is moo" - Joey Tribbiani

Yes, it's fictional usage but cdxx139's post reminded me how great an example it is.

Will
Sheffield UK
Designer of machine tools - user of modified screws

RE: Misuse / misquotes of phrases and sayings

Quote (cdxx139):

Today I learend its not a mute point but rather a moot point.  

   There is an old joke about a bunch of cowboys who have captured a horsethief.

   "We are going to try you for horse stealing before a jury of your peers, and then we are going to string you up."

   "A jury of my peers?  What is a peer?"

   The cowboys tell the horse thief what a peer is.

   "You mean I am going to be tried by a jury of horse thieves?"
 

               JHG

RE: Misuse / misquotes of phrases and sayings

There is one of the engineers here whom has a habit of repeatedly saying, after almost every statement he makes, "actually in fact".  It isn't that bad in a short conversation, but in any prolonged discussion, when that phrase out-numbers the quantity of statements actually germaine to the discussion, it becomes the most distracting thing in the world.  It is very difficult to sit through one of these discussions.  Combine this with his habit of repeating any statement that one makes to him about whatever the subject may be, then adding "actually in fact", and the statement, idea, concept or design is instantly his own.  Can be very frustrating.

Another engineer, quite well spoken and educated in England has very precise diction and ennunciates every statement very clearly.  He just happens to add an "or so" appendage to every other sentence.  He might say, "We need to summarize our questions to the client, or so.  Then we need to put together a cost for each item, or so.  And then provide an estimate for the amount of additional time we will need, or so."  It is unnecessary, and doesn't really change any meaning once you get used to it, and it doesn't carry over to his written communication, so it does no harm except to the mental health of those in the meeting or conversation with him.

RE: Misuse / misquotes of phrases and sayings

Why don't you tell him, or so?

BA

RE: Misuse / misquotes of phrases and sayings

on the phone right now with someone who insists on starting every sentence with "my only point is"
 

RE: Misuse / misquotes of phrases and sayings

(OP)
I just thought of a few others that bother the crap out of me...

These aren't really wrong sayings, well except for one... they just bother me...


supper instead of dinner
sweeper instead of vacuum
warsh instead of wash (this is the one that I say is poor English)
coke for everything that is a pop or soda
 

Cabbages, knickers, It hasn't got A BEAK!

RE: Misuse / misquotes of phrases and sayings

It took me a while to pluck up the courage to point out to my girlfriend that "bricks and water" might not be the best investment...

Although whenever I do have a problem, I can always count on her to "emphasise" with me, and I love her for it!

Another "pacific" phrase I'm used to hearing is "bless her cotton little socks."

More to follow I'm sure...

RE: Misuse / misquotes of phrases and sayings

haha... I'm going to have to try out the cotton socks on my neighbor, she is perpetually blessing others' hearts.

RE: Misuse / misquotes of phrases and sayings

what about T'was for "it was"  

peace
Fe

RE: Misuse / misquotes of phrases and sayings

Or Tain't for "it's not"...

John R. Baker, P.E.
Product 'Evangelist'
Product Design Solutions
Siemens PLM Software Inc.
Industry Sector
Cypress, CA
http://www.siemens.com/plm
http://www.plmworld.com/museum/

To an Engineer, the glass is twice as big as it needs to be.
 

RE: Misuse / misquotes of phrases and sayings

Kenat,
Nah. I don't hate it. In fact I don't mind most of these abbreviations. I was just point it out.
There are some language gurus that anticipate that this is in fact how we evolve our language. Eventually the most accepted little niks will get embedded into the language and the things we once though were stupid or gibberish will be the norm.  

peace
Fe

RE: Misuse / misquotes of phrases and sayings

My ex used to p1ss me off royally whenever she went into a cafe and ask for a "throffy" coffee.  She even talked our daughters into believing this was the right way of pronouncing the word. Arrggg.

RE: Misuse / misquotes of phrases and sayings

In the Midwest it is common when the temperatures are low and the wind is blowing to hear people complain about "the windshield factor."

Dan

www.eltronresearch.com
Dan's Blog

RE: Misuse / misquotes of phrases and sayings

I always thought it was the Winchell's factor?  :)

RE: Misuse / misquotes of phrases and sayings

Kenat,

My wife uses 'twee' all the time in it's proper meaning of excessivly cute or dainty or sentamental.  Something like that anyway, often while flipping through a home decor catalog which we seem to get too many of.

-Kirby

Kirby Wilkerson

Remember, first define the problem, then solve it.

RE: Misuse / misquotes of phrases and sayings

KENAT,
That's because it t'aint one thing and it t'aint the other.

RE: Misuse / misquotes of phrases and sayings

"supper instead of dinner"

Meal naming is beaten into us as kids.

'Er indoors refers to "dinner" as a hot meal, which is the one main meal of the day.  "Are we having A dinner?" she often used to ask as we were sitting in some food place looking at the menu ("Well I'm going to eat, dunno about you" would give me a death stare).  The other meal of the day is "lunch", which is usually smaller and cold, like a sandwich ... and mostly taken midday rather than in the evening.

Having A dinner in the noon hours made the whole naming scheme break down.

- Steve

LinkedIn
 

RE: Misuse / misquotes of phrases and sayings

Supper vs. Dinner...that's colloquial.  In the southern US, it was common that "dinner" referred to lunch and supper was the evening meal.  Both were "informal" connotations.  Over the years, I've noticed that "supper" is used less and the term "dinner" in place of lunch is only used in a few places, mostly by "old timers" or in the less cosmopolitan areas of the south ("out in the country" as they say).

RE: Misuse / misquotes of phrases and sayings

I was brought up to use breakfast when referring to the first meal of the day, lunch when referring to the noontime meal, and supper when referring to the last meal of the day.  Dinner, on the other hand, was the main meal of the day, which depending the circumstances, could be any one of the three meals.  That being said, I don't really care what you call it or when you eat it; a meal is a meal.
 

Good Luck
--------------
As a circle of light increases so does the circumference of darkness around it. - Albert Einstein

RE: Misuse / misquotes of phrases and sayings

Breakfast, dinner, supper where I grew up.  Then I went to the big city, and it was breakfast, lunch, dinner.  Here in Oz, it is breakfast, morning tea, lunch, afternoon tea, tea (yep, more often than dinner), supper.

RE: Misuse / misquotes of phrases and sayings

There seems to be a north-south divide in the UK.  In the north and midlands it's breakfast, dinner, tea.  In the south it's breakfast, lunch and dinner.  Supper is usually a light snack just before bedtime.

RE: Misuse / misquotes of phrases and sayings

When I was a kid we had school dinners.  Dinner ladies, who spent all  morning cooking food for almost all the kids in school.  It was real food too, no fast food allowed.  A kid's main meal could easily be at school, so maybe that's why so many people think of "dinner" as the main meal of the day, whenever it is taken.

I think these dinners were free at primary school age too.  I don't remember any money or meal tickets ever being mentioned.  But there were no options, you just got what you got.

- Steve

LinkedIn
 

RE: Misuse / misquotes of phrases and sayings

Steve,
I think I'm a few years older than you - and I certainly had to pay dinner money when at primary school. I have pretty clear memories (going back to a school I left in 1970) of there being two registers:  one which I think had green ruling (filled in with a series of alternating oblique strokes or circles) to record attendance - and a blue dinner money register.
A.  

RE: Misuse / misquotes of phrases and sayings

In approximate order during the day: Breakfast, Brunch, elevenses, tiffin, lunch, tea, dinner, supper, midnight snack.

Of course as alluded to by others, some of these terms are interchangeable and may shift in the day.

For instance, for me growing up school lunches were school dinners, and 'Sunday Dinner' was had in the middle of the day, with 'tea time' in the late afternoon being the 'evening' meal.

Posting guidelines FAQ731-376: Eng-Tips.com Forum Policies http://eng-tips.com/market.cfm? (probably not aimed specifically at you)
What is Engineering anyway: FAQ1088-1484: In layman terms, what is "engineering"?

RE: Misuse / misquotes of phrases and sayings

In keeping with the "or so" from above, I worked with a guy who ended most every sentence with "per se" for some reason.  In the south where I live it is Breakfast, Dinner, and Supper.  You often hear Dinner and Lunch used interchangeably.  And we can have tea with any of them (sweet tea, of course).

RE: Misuse / misquotes of phrases and sayings

OMG!
It's just brekie, lunch, dinner.
jeeze pipe

peace
Fe

RE: Misuse / misquotes of phrases and sayings

Years ago, after we acquired a company in Cambridge (UK), I made several visits there and one of the things that I had never seen in the states was when in the mid-afternoon the 'tea & sandwich' lady came around the office with her cart of hot tea (as well as coffee) and small crustless sandwiches.  Just one more example of why I think of England as one of the most 'civilized' places I have ever visited (and I've been to over 30 countries during 31 years with my company).

John R. Baker, P.E.
Product 'Evangelist'
Product Design Solutions
Siemens PLM Software Inc.
Industry Sector
Cypress, CA
http://www.siemens.com/plm
http://www.plmworld.com/museum/

To an Engineer, the glass is twice as big as it needs to be.
 

RE: Misuse / misquotes of phrases and sayings

What happens to the crusts?

BA

RE: Misuse / misquotes of phrases and sayings

In my travels I've learned that in some parts of the world, they cut off the crust (the outer edge of a slice of bread) when they make sandwiches, which I've always thought was odd since I consider that as being the only part of the loaf that was 'done' winky smile

John R. Baker, P.E.
Product 'Evangelist'
Product Design Solutions
Siemens PLM Software Inc.
Industry Sector
Cypress, CA
http://www.siemens.com/plm
http://www.plmworld.com/museum/

To an Engineer, the glass is twice as big as it needs to be.
 

RE: Misuse / misquotes of phrases and sayings

Seems like a terrible waste of good food to me.  The crust is the best part and the end slice of a loaf is the best slice, though perhaps not for sandwiches.

BA

RE: Misuse / misquotes of phrases and sayings

Couldn't agree with you more...

John R. Baker, P.E.
Product 'Evangelist'
Product Design Solutions
Siemens PLM Software Inc.
Industry Sector
Cypress, CA
http://www.siemens.com/plm
http://www.plmworld.com/museum/

To an Engineer, the glass is twice as big as it needs to be.
 

RE: Misuse / misquotes of phrases and sayings

Heels are make crackin' good toast!

"Good to know you got shoes to wear when you find the floor." - Robert Hunter
 

RE: Misuse / misquotes of phrases and sayings

To this day, I still call a refrigerator an ice box.  That's what we had as kids and I just can't change.

RE: Misuse / misquotes of phrases and sayings

Do you still use tin foil, too?

RE: Misuse / misquotes of phrases and sayings

(OP)
Oh I just thought of another glorious phrase of my former co-worker...


It came to Fruit-tition.... I used to chuckle every time he said that.
 

Cabbages, knickers, It hasn't got A BEAK!

RE: Misuse / misquotes of phrases and sayings

I all moot forgot. My onliest entry.

 

RE: Misuse / misquotes of phrases and sayings

Anyone besides me have a "hot water heater"?

RE: Misuse / misquotes of phrases and sayings

Quote:

hot water heater

Yes, my stove heats already hot water pipe

peace
Fe

RE: Misuse / misquotes of phrases and sayings

No, but I have a cold water cooler.

BA

RE: Misuse / misquotes of phrases and sayings

All this talk about food.... I am likely to be strung up for homicide/murder one day when I hear "let's do lunch" called out by some dickhead to another......
How do you "do" lunch? Do they intend to cook it?


Oh, and something missing from our culinary delights in another thread, and I enjoyed some last week, Scratchings..... luvlly jubbly!

My SB has some good expressions.
I am so used to them I tend not to notice unless she says them to someone else and it is there look of confusion that alerts me to another of her little foibles.

Here's a simple example:

"Beans" , meaning Bees ...
"remember me to get some garlic". "Remind me." say I automatically. We've got some set dialogue down now that has been going on for 15 years.
She says it wrong and I correct her and she says it wrong again. 15 bloody years of this.

But guess what appears in the sh1t argument list with the regularity of the Great Escape at Xmass...my never helping her with her English.....
  

JMW
www.ViscoAnalyser.com

 

RE: Misuse / misquotes of phrases and sayings

"paralysis analysis"

I've seen this phrase used on this site a few times, when I'm pretty sure they mean "analysis paralysis" i.e. too busy analyzing the problem to actually solve it/make a decision.

I'd have thought "paralysis analysis" would be what neurologists or someone did.

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RE: Misuse / misquotes of phrases and sayings

I worked on a job that had structural helpers. One of which was the most happy go-lucky individual you have ever met. The words she use to invent...My favorite was when she said" you must have misunheard me..."  

RE: Misuse / misquotes of phrases and sayings

I think the actual phrase is "paralysis by analysis".
 

John R. Baker, P.E.
Product 'Evangelist'
Product Design Solutions
Siemens PLM Software Inc.
Industry Sector
Cypress, CA
http://www.siemens.com/plm
http://www.plmworld.com/museum/

To an Engineer, the glass is twice as big as it needs to be.
 

RE: Misuse / misquotes of phrases and sayings

Quote (KENAT):

I've seen this phrase used on this site a few times, when I'm pretty sure they mean "analysis paralysis" i.e. too busy analyzing the problem to actually solve it/make a decision.

Guilty!  I did it this morning w/out thinking.  I often don't think so please forgive me.  smile  If you don't, I'll forever walk with my head hanging in shame.  winky smile

RE: Misuse / misquotes of phrases and sayings

KENAT, you crack me up.  smile

RE: Misuse / misquotes of phrases and sayings



Quote:

In keeping with the "or so" from above, I worked with a guy who ended most every sentence with "per se" for some reason.  In the south where I live it is Breakfast, Dinner, and Supper.  You often hear Dinner and Lunch used interchangeably.  And we can have tea with any of them (sweet tea, of course).

One of the most curious conversational quippings I have ever heard:  My friend where we lived in West Virginia, USA would often end a sentence with ".... on the the thing."  But sometimes during the conversation, he would abbreviate this "ending" with "...on it."

Example:  "Yeah, I've had this knife collection for niegh-onto 17 year on the thing.  Sure nuff, I wouldn't part with none of um on it.

RE: Misuse / misquotes of phrases and sayings

Most curious thing about a West Virgina conversation would be if it didn't include the phrase "lookit" and end with either "darlin'" or "youall".

RE: Misuse / misquotes of phrases and sayings

Uh oh, "...on the thing" sounds normal to me, and my folks hail from western KY, not WV.

"Good to know you got shoes to wear when you find the floor." - Robert Hunter
 

RE: Misuse / misquotes of phrases and sayings

Quote:

Uh oh, "...on the thing" sounds normal to me, and my folks hail from western KY, not WV.

Hmmmmm -- Normal eh?  Makes me feel almost abnormal.  Could you elucidate on the meaning of "...on the thing."?

RE: Misuse / misquotes of phrases and sayings

One of my former co-workers related that he'd bought his toddler daughter a "unicef".

When the obvious questions arose, he explained, "you know, like a horse, with a big johnson on his head".

 

old field guy

RE: Misuse / misquotes of phrases and sayings

A classic and a good album: Disraeli Gears. Similar to going over like a Led Zepplin.

RE: Misuse / misquotes of phrases and sayings

I didn't realize how long this discussion was until halfway through.  I couldn't finish it all but it was very funny.  I've got a co-worker who uses TOUCHE often and inappropriately.  Usually (aside from the use in fencing of course) you can respond to someone's witty point with a "touche" (two-shay) just to be funny.  He will respond to anything.

Him:  Let's walk over to the deli down the street for lunch.
Me:  I've been craving BBQ.  Let's drive to Billy Bob's.  
Him:  Touche!!

 

RE: Misuse / misquotes of phrases and sayings

My local paper has an entertainment writer who regularly writes that this or that new band, restaurant or whatever has "cache".

Too lazy to look up unfamiliar words I suppose:)

Regards,

Mike

RE: Misuse / misquotes of phrases and sayings


Is it just my poor hearing or has anyone else ever heard the phrase, "...,for all intents and purposes" misquoted as, "...for all intensive purposes."?

RE: Misuse / misquotes of phrases and sayings

SnTMan:  I was thinking that was acceptable usasge pronounced (ka-shay), but I just looked it up and the food writer and I are making the error of using the wrong spelling for a near-homophone.  He should be writing that the band or restaurant has "cachet".  I also thought that cache could be pronounced either way, but dictionary.com does not support this as it only lists (kash) for the pronunciation.  Thanks for the lesson, I have learned something today.

-Kirby

Kirby Wilkerson

Remember, first define the problem, then solve it.

RE: Misuse / misquotes of phrases and sayings

Glad to do it:)

RE: Misuse / misquotes of phrases and sayings

Metman,

 "...for all intensive purposes."

I hear people saying that all of the time. I have stopped trying to correct them. After all, Grammar isn't Rocket Surgery!

Rerig

RE: Misuse / misquotes of phrases and sayings

I had a phone interview for a co-op position in a Blow Molding facility. It didn't sound as interesting as another interview I had already been to and I was pretty sure I would get (I did).  He was explaining that it would be a good place to get a foot in the door for automotive jobs later and I would have opportunities for networking.  So I thought I replied with "I don't think I would want a job that has me pigeon-holed into such a specialized process"

The guy I was talking to was obviously shocked for a few seconds so I rewound my internal tape recorder and realized I actually said.

"I don't think I want a job that that has me Corn-Holed into such a specialized process"

Needless to say he mentioned that my lack interest was unfortunate but understandable and the interview ended about a minute later.
I never use the words Pigeon-holed anymore for fear I will do it again some day.  

RE: Misuse / misquotes of phrases and sayings

Corn hole is a very popular game in much of the American South.

.... no, it's not what you think. It's like horseshoes except you throw been bags and try to get them through a hole in a slanted 2'x3'board. The name comes from how the game originated using corn cobs rather than bean bags.

RE: Misuse / misquotes of phrases and sayings

Yes we have that game here in the big OH.  But 10 years ago we didn't and it universally meant something much different.  

RE: Misuse / misquotes of phrases and sayings

Had a boss who was famous for this.  He could slaughter any word possible and always with a straight face.

His daughter was 21 or so before she found out that it wasn't really "veryclose veins".

He would mention putting 'frezone' in the AC.

He was going to transfer an employee to another city and move him there 'livestock and barrel'.

He mentioned looking for someone to hire with 'vim, vigor and vitalis.'

He'd have you in for a serious conversation and then look at you funny when you tried to stifle a laugh while he was talking.  I'll post more of his if they come to me.  Unfortunately, many of his are now part of my vocabulary, although I added "rocket surgery" this evening.

I usually say 'six of one, half of another'.

rmw

 

RE: Misuse / misquotes of phrases and sayings

When my friend, Bob, saw the fender bender on my car, he asked me, "what happened to your car?"  I replied, " oh I pulled a dumb stunt."  Bob immediately -- in about two nanoseconds -- replied, "Leonard it's not a stunt car."  Bob is the quickest wit I have ever known.

One comedian said it should be:

Hersterectomy instead of Hysterectomy and

Hisniotomy    instead of Herniotomy

RE: Misuse / misquotes of phrases and sayings

A Favorite:

"No Left Turn Un-Stoned."

RE: Misuse / misquotes of phrases and sayings

"Tooth-comb" anyone?  Possibly even a "fine" one.

- Steve
 

RE: Misuse / misquotes of phrases and sayings

I have been told growing up that, just before I was born, my father sang the following to my mother:

"I love you from here to maternity.".

Her English was a bit better than his at the time.

Regards,

SNORGY.

RE: Misuse / misquotes of phrases and sayings

SNORGY, maybe he meant it:)

RE: Misuse / misquotes of phrases and sayings

SnTMan:

Considering how I turned out, sadly, there may be a ring of truth in that.

Regards,

SNORGY.

RE: Misuse / misquotes of phrases and sayings

Sometimes the guys in the shop have to call the "Project Mangler" out to take a look, and determine why the parts that were ordered don't fit together.

Or when some threaded stainless parts are "galded" together.

RE: Misuse / misquotes of phrases and sayings

1gibson, I don't see anything wrong with the first statement:)

RE: Misuse / misquotes of phrases and sayings

Agreed, once they get out there and see the problem it rarely is appropriate to correct the phrase...

RE: Misuse / misquotes of phrases and sayings

Most of you know of many people using the word may when they mean might.

An interesting thought entered my mind today:

Maybe the word "maybe" is in part a reason that people use "may" when they mean "might (be)."

One of the synonyms for possibility is "might be" and another synonym is "maybe."  So there could be a subconscious association of words.

I am eager but not anxious for any comments.

RE: Misuse / misquotes of phrases and sayings

You really need to get a life.

OH, sorry.  That wasn't the sort of comment that you were looking for, now was it?

John R. Baker, P.E.
Product 'Evangelist'
Product Design Solutions
Siemens PLM Software Inc.
Industry Sector
Cypress, CA
http://www.siemens.com/plm
http://www.plmworld.com/museum/

To an Engineer, the glass is twice as big as it needs to be.
 

RE: Misuse / misquotes of phrases and sayings

maybe

RE: Misuse / misquotes of phrases and sayings

metman, I may be wrong but I think it would be wise for you to change your "maybe" response to JohnRBaker on getting a life to "will."  winky smile

RE: Misuse / misquotes of phrases and sayings

(OP)
How about this gem I heard yesterday at a cook out....

Make sure you use explanation marks in that text so he knows you are angry...

Cabbages, knickers, It hasn't got A BEAK!

RE: Misuse / misquotes of phrases and sayings

And here I thought that that was what UPPERCASE was intended for.  If I weren't emotionally involved I WOULDN'T BE SHOUTING AT YOU!!! (of course, a few exclamation points never hurt)

And let's not forget utilizing BOLD RED UPPERCASE.

John R. Baker, P.E.
Product 'Evangelist'
Product Design Solutions
Siemens PLM Software Inc.
Industry Sector
Cypress, CA
http://www.siemens.com/plm
http://www.plmworld.com/museum/

To an Engineer, the glass is twice as big as it needs to be.
 

RE: Misuse / misquotes of phrases and sayings

denial and error.

RE: Misuse / misquotes of phrases and sayings

Just heard a good one today: "Stab ourselves in the foot."

Situation arose where a salesman "stabbed us in the back" at the factory by selling equipment with some unpriced, unrealistic features on a short delivery.

Factory now has to eat the cost and likely will not meet delivery of the equipment, so the company as a whole has "shot ourselves in the foot."

Chalk this one up as a misquote, but definitely not misuse. I don't think he realized what he was saying but subconscious or not, have to give him credit for coming up with it.

RE: Misuse / misquotes of phrases and sayings

Better than shooting yourself in the back, I suppose, if such a thing were possible...:)

RE: Misuse / misquotes of phrases and sayings

Make sure you get it right the first time, as testing could prove to be problematic since it might leave you in a state where you were unable to reload and set everything back up for the official run through winky smile

John R. Baker, P.E.
Product 'Evangelist'
Product Design Solutions
Siemens PLM Software Inc.
Industry Sector
Cypress, CA
http://www.siemens.com/plm
UG/NX Museum:   http://www.plmworld.org/p/cm/ld/fid=209

To an Engineer, the glass is twice as big as it needs to be.
 

RE: Misuse / misquotes of phrases and sayings

I'd argue that "shooting yourself in the back" would mean taking extreme measures to sabotage yourself.

Where "shooting yourself in the foot" is likely accidental.

RE: Misuse / misquotes of phrases and sayings

"shooting yourself in the foot" is an expression that hails from the days of gunslinging.  Imagine being off your game, grabbing for your sidearm and pulling the trigger before the gun leaves the holster.  Yeah a shot in the foot is a careless gunslinger.

Stabbing yourself in the foot gets lost in translation. Yeah it's an injury, but the premise isn't there.

f-d

¡papá gordo ain't no madre flaca!

RE: Misuse / misquotes of phrases and sayings

I saw the phrase "dogging the grim reaper" today.  A typo I'm sure (and I hope).

- Steve
 

RE: Misuse / misquotes of phrases and sayings

That's odd.

I thought "shooting yourself in the foot" was a First World War stratagem for getting yourself sent back from the Front without suffering too much lasting damage.  As an expression, originally used to describe an act which, while self-destructive at face value, is intended to leave you better off in the long term.

A.

RE: Misuse / misquotes of phrases and sayings

My wife's favorite misquote..."Like a Wolf in Cheap Clothing".

At first I thought she was referring to me. :)

RE: Misuse / misquotes of phrases and sayings

Had a welder tell us that he was buying his little girl a "unicef" for Christmas.

"A unicef?"

"Yeah, you know, like a hose with a big johnson growin' out his head..."

old field guy

RE: Misuse / misquotes of phrases and sayings

I heard while in the south, "Y'all" for a few people, "All Y'all" for several groups of people.

RE: Misuse / misquotes of phrases and sayings

Y'all is the proper second person plural pronoun.  All y'all means "each and every one of you individually" as opposed to all of you as a group.
Yankees say you's guys or some such nonsense.  Y'all is actually a historical phrasing of the second person pronoun.  Also, Yankees don't have any way of phrasing all y'all to mean each one of you as opposed to you as a group.  
Some Yankees think y'all is used in the singular because Southerners, politely, will say y'all when speaking to an individual who is representing a company or business and therefore is a representative of a larger group.

RE: Misuse / misquotes of phrases and sayings

Y'all might-could write a book about this stuff.

f-d

¡papá gordo ain't no madre flaca!

RE: Misuse / misquotes of phrases and sayings

I call this a kind of 'expression dyslexia', and it seems to afflict young journalists and TV presenters most acutely.  I am not sure if it is that, or just a lethal combination of overeagerness and underliteracy.  Either way, it grates on my O-C brain every time.   

RE: Misuse / misquotes of phrases and sayings

And what is an Orange County brain?

RE: Misuse / misquotes of phrases and sayings

It's what you use to design an OC Chopper.

RE: Misuse / misquotes of phrases and sayings

That would be obsessive-compulsive, I would guess.

RE: Misuse / misquotes of phrases and sayings

The misuse of your, you're, they're, there, their, etc.

The spelling of etc. as "ect." (ectetera??)

He should "of" known that it was not the right way to spell them.

NX 7.5
Teamcenter 8

RE: Misuse / misquotes of phrases and sayings

A minor sin in any other forum.

RE: Misuse / misquotes of phrases and sayings

I was at a design presentation and one of the engineers was asked a question. His answer was, " Of course, some componentalising will need to be done..." and just kept rolling on

RE: Misuse / misquotes of phrases and sayings

Pittsburgh language:  http://www.pittsburghese.com/

And then we have the Yoopers on the UP and the Tidewater accent along some of the Atlantic Coast.  We have Cajun.....  The US is a diverse country, eh?

Pamela K. Quillin, P.E.
Quillin Engineering, LLC

RE: Misuse / misquotes of phrases and sayings

My local journalist type recently struck again with "...taking a different tact".

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