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Near UV LED (around 350nm)

Near UV LED (around 350nm)

Near UV LED (around 350nm)

(OP)
Colleagues,

I'm setting up a fluorescence experiment with quinine as fluorescent dye. Quinine is a common fluorescence standard, that's why I chose it. The caveat with quinine, though, is that its excitation band is in near UV; peak is between 320nm and 370nm. Due to size constraints, I'd like to use LED for excitation. At the moment I don't know the minimum amount of illumination that will be needed.

First, I've looked for LEDs with wavelength peak in the desired range. The LEDs I was able to find are low power – under 1mW. In terms of flux, it's 10s of mlm vs. 1000s of mlm delivered by high power blue LEDs (e.g. Osram Golden Dragon).

Currently, I'm looking for high power visible light LEDs with broad tails extending into UV. Haven't found a suitable one yet.

Any suggestion or insight is really appreciated!

- Nick

RE: Near UV LED (around 350nm)

I doubt you will find a visible down converting LED that has much UV content. Typically it is a goal to avoid UV in lighting applications. Down converting LEDs use deep blue chips in the 400 to 465 range (405 and 450 are common) and the phosphors won't be putting out UV at all.

UV LEDs are available but tend to be a little expensive. What about a hand held UV cure light from Dymax or Loctite?

Harold
SW2010 SP3.0 OPW2010 SP1.0 Win XP Pro 2002 SP3
Dell 690, Xeon 5160 @3.00GHz, 3.25GB RAM
nVidia Quadro FX4600
www.lumenflow.com

RE: Near UV LED (around 350nm)

Far as I know, most visible LEDs are putting out the baseline blue LED pump wavelength, and fluorescing stuff above that, since the objective is to even out the perceived spectrum.

TTFN

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RE: Near UV LED (around 350nm)

And don't expect an LED with a wide tail, either... the whole point of LEDs is single (and sometimes multiple) excitation bands, which leads to very narrow wavelengths (or multiple wavelengths, all narrow).

Dan - Owner
http://www.Hi-TecDesigns.com

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