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Foaming MDEA problem

Foaming MDEA problem

Foaming MDEA problem

(OP)
How is foaming measured in the Lean Amine sample? What is considered too much foaming?  

RE: Foaming MDEA problem

Too much foaming is defined by not being able to make specification on the treated gas.  OR, if amine losses exceed the design.

here is 1 link I googled up, I remeber some lab test where you just took a sample of the amine and shook it, then added a drop of oil and shook it again and noted the difference.

http://www.d-foam.com/files/Unit_Foaming_Potential_and_Training.pdf

 

RE: Foaming MDEA problem

Dear Aaronb82,

You could see in the appendix of this following reference from Pall for the method:

http://www.pall.com/pdf/GDS120.pdf

Once I was informed by an MDEA manufacturer that they use these following numbers to interpret the result of such analysis and determine the severity of foaming:

Rating          Foam Volume               Break Time

Nil                 < 10 ml                   < 5 sec

Slight             11-60 ml                6 – 20 sec

Moderate          61-125 ml               21 – 30 sec

Severe             > 125 ml                  > 30 sec

Hope this help
 

RE: Foaming MDEA problem

(OP)
What would cause the Recyle H2 gas leaving the Scrubber to be 150 degrees? The lean amine is 130 degrees and the gas going into the Scrubber is 95 degrees.   

RE: Foaming MDEA problem

The amine reacts with the H2S to produce a water soluble salt. This reaction is exothermic, hence the higher outlet temperature.

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