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Due to

Due to

(OP)

Is it correct to say : "it was cancelled due to rain"?
If not, what would be the correct phrasing ?

RE: Due to

No, it is correct to say that "It rains all the time and if you let a bit of rain interfere with things nothing will ever happen."  winky smile

From the way too hot Pacific Northwest where we could sure use some of that "rains all the time".

RE: Due to

It's a bit blurred, but English language pedants will probably tell you that "due to" means "attributable to", where as "owing to" means "because of".

- Steve

RE: Due to

That most welcome phrase in the English language, "Rain stopped play".

JMW
www.ViscoAnalyser.com
 

RE: Due to

"It rained, it was cancelled."

RE: Due to

If you say something and a normal person does not raise a eye brow, that generally means you are all right. Normal does not include purists, pundits and paranoids who think they are the guardian of a language.

If you dare to include me in normals, I would say yes. In fact, I find many Americans say and write "do to", which obviously erroneous but they mean "due to". You could use "because of"


 

Rafiq Bulsara
http://www.srengineersct.com

RE: Due to

25362,
"It was cancelled due to rain." is correct usage.

RE: Due to

... is probably as common as "owing to rain" in modern usage, though not strictly correct.

- Steve

RE: Due to

Most people use "due to" to mean exactly the same as "because of".  Purists will say that they're not the same, that it means something more like "caused by", and so has to follow a noun rather than a full clause.

When I'm editing someone else's writing, I don't usually replace "due to" with "because of" unless I'm feeling really, really persnickety, but I do in my own writing.

So it depends on how fussy you want to be, or how fussy you think your readers will be.

Hg
 

Eng-Tips policies:  FAQ731-376: Eng-Tips.com Forum Policies

RE: Due to

I used "due to" in conversation but "because of" more often in writing.  Not by design, but something I thought about as I read the thread.

drawn to design, designed to draw

RE: Due to

(OP)

Trying to summarize about the meanings and correct use of "due to":

• owed to, as in $ 1 due to David
• because of, as in the cancellation, due to rain, of...
• arranged to, as in the meeting is due to end next Monday.

Am I on the right track ?

RE: Due to

I'm not awfully keen on CSD72's "It rained, it was cancelled."; the two instances of "it" almost certainly refer to different things.

A.

RE: Due to

I like 25362's summary.

Note the difference between a *cancellation* being due to rain, and something being *cancelled* due to (or rather because of) rain.

But, again, the average speaker won't know or care about the difference.

Hg

Eng-Tips policies:  FAQ731-376: Eng-Tips.com Forum Policies

RE: Due to

As jmw has hinted, who cares?  A draw is a draw.

- Steve

RE: Due to

I don't go walking on my lawn in only my socks first thing in the morning, because that, my friends, is dew terrain.

Sorry, it has been a long day.

RE: Due to

Why not just skip all the confusing jargon and say: "it was canceled 'cause the weather sucked."

@richkeoh - lol. Thanks for the laugh!

Jeff Mirisola, CSWP, Certified DriveWorks AE
CAD Administrator, Ultimate Survival Technologies
My Blog

RE: Due to

jmw - not if you were losing and past the 5th inning!

RE: Due to

Richkeogh, best pun I've seen in months :)

RE: Due to

You know, I've certainly heard, read, and used "due to" plenty of times.  I don't think I've ever come across "owing to" in any kind of common usage.

Edward L. Klein
Pipe Stress Engineer
Houston, Texas

"All the world is a Spring"

All opinions expressed here are my own and not my company's.

RE: Due to

Due to / owing to both mean "because of".
Due / owing to the bad weather, the match was cancelled.

Some people believe that it is incorrect to use 'due to'at the beginning of a clause in this way, but the structure is common in educated usage.  (Practical English Usage,Michael Swan,Oxford University Press, 1980)

RE: Due to

or "as a result of" . . .

RE: Due to

That is absolutely correct usage. Some might be confused in using whether "due to" or "because of" but there is an excat diference between them. If something occurs as a results of someone's action or effect you need to use "becuase of" while the effect coming from other things "due to" is used.

Regards.
 

RE: Due to

HgTX please unveil what you mean?

RE: Due to

"If something occurs as a results of someone's action or effect you need to use 'because of' while the effect coming from other things 'due to' is used."

I can't tell what you're saying.  And can you cite a reference for this?

Hg

Eng-Tips policies:  FAQ731-376: Eng-Tips.com Forum Policies

RE: Due to


 It is only correct if the event actually was cancelled due to inclement weather. If that was not the case then the statement is false. Am I missing something here? smile

Dan

RE: Due to

Does anyone know when the rescheduled game is on?

drawn to design, designed to draw

RE: Due to

Since this is a language forum ...

==> Does anyone know when the rescheduled game is on?
If the game was cancelled, then it would not be rescheduled.  If the game were postponed, then it would be rescheduled.
 

Good Luck
--------------
As a circle of light increases so does the circumference of darkness around it. - Albert Einstein

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