×
INTELLIGENT WORK FORUMS
FOR ENGINEERING PROFESSIONALS

Contact US

Log In

Come Join Us!

Are you an
Engineering professional?
Join Eng-Tips Forums!
  • Talk With Other Members
  • Be Notified Of Responses
    To Your Posts
  • Keyword Search
  • One-Click Access To Your
    Favorite Forums
  • Automated Signatures
    On Your Posts
  • Best Of All, It's Free!

*Eng-Tips's functionality depends on members receiving e-mail. By joining you are opting in to receive e-mail.

Posting Guidelines

Promoting, selling, recruiting, coursework and thesis posting is forbidden.

Students Click Here

What does it take to make moonlighting work?
9

What does it take to make moonlighting work?

What does it take to make moonlighting work?

(OP)
I currently work at a municipality doing... well, all the things that a city engineer does. Previously I worked with a geotechnical consulting firm for 5 years.

In discussing "moonlighting" with our HR director, I was informed that our policy is not to perform any engineering work "on the side" within the county (for various reason primarily relating to the potential appearance of conflicts of interest).

I have the opportunity to do a few small jobs primarily involving things like percolation tests (and septic system design - residential), and potentially some aspects of small subdivision design such as driange studies... or even developing full construction plans for small subdivisions.

All of this work can easily be performed on nights and weekends given that I am smart enough not to take on more than can be accomodated on nights and weekends.

I guess my primary question is this:  How much revenue do you generally have to generate to make it worthwhile to moonlight.  I'm not sure how insurance premiums are set initially if you arent sure how much revenue you will be generating; but I'm hearing that it could costs between $5,000 and $15,000 per year just to do around $50,000 worth or work.  This, of course is not to mention computer/software upkeep, printing fees, etc.

Based on what I have read in other posts, I expect 1/2 to 2/3 of the responses here will be discussing the ethical aspects of "moonlighting".  I welcome posts of this nature as well.  


RE: What does it take to make moonlighting work?

Unless I've signed a contract specifically stating "no moonlighting", I'll do what I damn well please when I'm not on the clock.  Ethical lesson over...

This is a question more for you than anyone else... how much work are you willing to put in for X amount of money in return?  If I had to work an extra 35-40% hours a week to make 35-40% of my salary, I'd look for another job that allows overtime pay.  At least that way I can decide when to make the extra cash without worrying about the fixed cost of insurance, etc. every year.  If it only cost me a few thousand in fixed costs, however, to potentially pull in $50k for a minimum of hours, that's a different story.

Dan - Owner
http://www.Hi-TecDesigns.com

RE: What does it take to make moonlighting work?

ditto macgyvers.  Your employer is always your primary responsibility, and you must abide by their ethics restrictions, time requirements, etc.  But my personal time is mine, and what I do with it is not their business.  I work for them, but they don't own or control me.

Your field may require certain liability and Errors & Ommisions insurance, maybe not.  That will determine your costs vs. revenue required.  

You may consider starting small, doing minor problem solving gigs with low liability issues so that you can work out the kinks of the moonlighting method.  Also to develop a reputation so that you can get repeat business and referrals.  With enough nuturing, your moonlighting biz can go full time.  It's worked for me.

TygerDawg
Blue Technik LLC
Advanced Robotics & Automation Engineering
www.bluetechnik.com

RE: What does it take to make moonlighting work?

2
(OP)
Are you suggesting that for some things that I put my stamp on, I may not need E&O insurance?  If this is true, that is the type of information I am looking for.

Assuming I was paying for E&O insurance, how it is typically quoted?  Obviouly, if I only generated $1000 of revenue, I would be losing money by not covering my overhead.  What I'm trying to find out is where the 'break even' point typically is.  Will $20k of billing cover overhead for night&weekend home-office work?

I know some people don't play by the rules and don't get insurance, pay taxes, used licensed software, etc... but I'm wondering how difficult it is to make it work if you play by the rules.  

The unknown variable for me are: What typs of insurances I need and how much they will cost (versus the type of work and magnitude of revenue I'm generating).  Aditionally, what other fixed overhead costs might I be missing?

RE: What does it take to make moonlighting work?

The government (and PE boards) are mostly silent on insurance after your vehicle is insured and you've provided Workers Comp for employees.  The place where it comes in is (1) how much risk can you tolerate? and (2) what does your Master Service Agreement require?  In Oil & Gas, MSA's generally require $1 million liability on any vehicles that go on site and $3 million general liability.  None of the contracts I've signed (19 to date) even require E&O insurance.  I only have it because a lawsuit would bankrupt my company and me personally, not a risk I'm willing to take.

You need to talk to your potential clients about their insurance requirements--if they don't require liability insurance then E&O is much less expensive.

My liability and E&O cost about $18/thousand in gross billing.  The first year I guessed at my future gross billing and the insurance rate was $35/thousand because the guess was so low.  At the end of the year they audited me and billed me in arrears for the under-estimation (the second bill was larger than the first, but my actual billing put me into a different bracket so the second year rate was $25/thousand, the per thousand rate has gone down some every year as my billings have gone up).

The other fixed costs are pretty small.  You'll need a phone number for your business (voice over IP can work good for that), a fax machine (e-Fax works), and my biggest cost was quality printers (I went with a Xerox printer/copier/scanner combo for most stuff and got a wide carriage Canon for prints).  I relied on Office Max for wide carriage prints for a while, but it was really inconvenient and the quality mostly sucked.  

When I started I got a loan from my 401K (again that mitigates risk since if your business doesn't make it you don't destroy your credit by defaulting to someone else, you just screw up your retirement) to cover the start-up costs and the payments on the loan are still (4 years later) the biggest single recurring monthly cost my business has after my salary.

If you're going to claim a home-office deduction on your taxes then you need to have a committed space for the business and if the auditors come you have to demonstrate that the space doesn't double as a kids play area or your family financial center.

David Simpson, PE
MuleShoe Engineering
www.muleshoe-eng.com
Please see FAQ731-376: Eng-Tips.com Forum Policies for tips on how to make the best use of Eng-Tips Fora.

The harder I work, the luckier I seem

RE: What does it take to make moonlighting work?

"my personal time is mine, and what I do with it is not their business.  I work for them, but they don't own or control me."

No but they can fire you.

RE: What does it take to make moonlighting work?

Look at this from the view of a client.
Jurisdiction may be the key but city engineer, county engineer are the same to a lot of people.
You come out to my place and design a septic system.  The county engineer kicks it over. I am going to complain that someone in the "goverment" approved it.
Someone in the county goverment complains to the city, right or wrong your going to be explaining things.
You get more work than your competition, they are going to complain that you use your connections to get "their" work.  Do you see and know of building projects before they do?
I am not against moonlighting, it just in your situation I see more "mines" in the minefields than other situations.

RE: What does it take to make moonlighting work?

(OP)
David, thanks for the input.  A plotter is something I would only consider if I found out I really needed it after a couple of medium sized projects.  I am basically just trying to find a way not to pass up small jobs as I get offered by word of mouth.  Currently, I pass on these small opportunities because I am not setup to confidently/legally perform the work. I have no intention of doing this full-time.  

I enjoy design work, especially when it varies slightly from project to project.  I am looking for a way to do some of this work during some of my free time without a big risk of losing money in the process.

If my place of employment did not allow work of this nature, I would not do it. It is as simple as that. They don't allow me to use any city property for personal use; So I don't do it.  For me, these rules are not difficult to abide by.  I enjoy my work I do now and I stay busy doing it.  I think I would enjoy doing some additional engineering work during my free time as well... that is the motivation behind this thread.

RE: What does it take to make moonlighting work?

Even if you did not sign an employment contract which forbids moonlighting, you may have an Employee Policy Manual that covers it.
I do think that as a municipal employee the appearance of a conflict of interest is very real, if you perform work within the municipality's jurisdiction. Fox guarding the henhouse and all that.
You have been told by HR that the policy is no moonlighting.  If discovered, you have no defense.  Is the extra income worth the risk of losing your  job?

RE: What does it take to make moonlighting work?

Can you do the work in adjoining counties instead of the one you're working in?

Dan - Owner
http://www.Hi-TecDesigns.com

RE: What does it take to make moonlighting work?

(OP)
"Even if you did not sign an employment contract which forbids moonlighting, you may have an Employee Policy Manual that covers it.
I do think that as a municipal employee the appearance of a conflict of interest is very real, if you perform work within the municipality's jurisdiction. Fox guarding the henhouse and all that.
You have been told by HR that the policy is no moonlighting.  If discovered, you have no defense.  Is the extra income worth the risk of losing your  job?
"

For some reason, when it comes to the topic of moonlighting, everyone on these forums makes bold assumptions about other engineer's ill motives.

I clearly stated that the HR director outlined the areas in which a city engineer is not to perform professional services.  This is also clearly stated in the policy manual.  I thought I clearly implied that I did not intend to do work in those restricted areas.  I have plenty of opportunity in the adjacent counties, which are within very short driving distances (10 minutes in one direction or 20 in the other).  The City neither has any jurisdiction outside of the county we are in, nor does the policy restrict work in adjacent counties.

I will not break any rules or practice unethically in any capacity. I think it's sad that I am not given the benefit of the doubt on a professional forum.  If I had stated something that indicated I would be unintentionally practicing unethically, I would definately want to know about it... but you are merely being cynical at this point.

Nonetheless, its still great getting feedback from other engineers, and I appreciate your time spent responding to my posts.

RE: What does it take to make moonlighting work?

I think you need to re read your original post. Nowhere does it imply that you were considering work only outside your county.  You can tell by the replies that it's not clear that you were not going to work in the "restricted" areas.

RE: What does it take to make moonlighting work?

(OP)
You are correct.  I apologize for being unclear.

Regarding E&O insurance:  Can one policy cover two engineers working in a parntership (ie- A policy that covers the entire LLC or Corp)? Or does each engineer need seperate coverage?

RE: What does it take to make moonlighting work?

Like Geosavvy I am also interested in moonlighting, maybe not now, so soon in my career, but in the near future. What I am wondering is how much does it cost to run a small business out of your home? 5K/year, 10K/year... With all the insurances and liabilities and that kind of stuff. Or in other words how much do you need to do to make it profitable? 10hr/wk, 20hr/wk... @ what rate 80$/hr, 100$/hr... I know this will vary from state to state and from industry to industry, but an idea of what people have experience in their industry and their area would be a great help.

So even another way to ask the question would be when you started your business out of your home, what was your overhead in the first year? and did you have a hard time being profitable?

I have asked this question of other people around my area that are in the oil and gas business in New Mexico and they said that 13K was the bare minimum overhead for a small business out of your home. This took into account legal stuff, software licenses for CAD and other programs and other minor overhead stuff. The legal included the one million liability that zdas04 mentioned. I was wondering if others on this forum experienced similar things when starting up their businesses.

RE: What does it take to make moonlighting work?

Get out your spreadsheets and do the math.

Get quotes for software you think you'll need.
Get quotes for insurance, which you should be doing anyway.
Get quotes for computer hardware and any other office supplies.
Find out how much it costs for your lawyer/accountant to set up your LLC or whatever corporation structure you're going to use.
Find out how much the firm registration costs annualy through your local professional engineering board - because you must be licensed to perform engineering services.

Add them all up and that's how much money you are going to need.  Figure out how much time you can work billable hours per week/month/year and that determines the rate you can charge.  Is your rate competitive in the market?

There are plenty of posts dealing with this topic on eng-tips, do a search.  There are plenty of free websites devoted to starting your own business, do a search.

--Scott

http://wertel.eng.pro

RE: What does it take to make moonlighting work?


       No but they can fire you.

My experience is that it could happen when you're NOT moonlighting, too.

I've decided to build my own safety net.  The financial freedom and confidence it provides is thrilling.  It's clear some folks aren't up to the task.

TygerDawg
Blue Technik LLC
Advanced Robotics & Automation Engineering
www.bluetechnik.com

RE: What does it take to make moonlighting work?

In my part of the woods if you are a government employee working for a contractor you could end up with a new career making licese plate for 5-10 years depending on your behavior. Workig for a contractor that does business in your county can create huge conflicts of interest. If you do have a firm you could work for with out a conflict, you may want to talk to them about being a part time employee. You would not be eligible for benifits, which is okay, but you would probably be covered by there e&o and have access to their resources. This would give you minimal start up costs. Even though you would be classified as a part time employee, you would be acting as a consultant.

RE: What does it take to make moonlighting work?

DRC,

That's like saying the bottom-rung employees of Enron should go to jail just for working there.  They didn't do anything wrong, they didn't even know something was wrong.

...now the guys on the top rungs, well, that's a different matter...

As long as geo is conscious of the choices he makes and ensures they're all without conflict, he'll be fine in any potential court case.

Dan - Owner
http://www.Hi-TecDesigns.com

RE: What does it take to make moonlighting work?

My poit is that different standards (and laws) apply to interaction between government employees and government contractors than people in the private sector. Simply working for a contractor that works in the same municipality, even if the part time work has nothing to do with the full time municipal work, could be a serious violation. I am not questioning anyone's integrity, but some places have very strict government ethics laws that as a municipal employee, geosavy may need to consider.

RE: What does it take to make moonlighting work?

As someone who has ran a small consulting business, I think that it is unethical to moonlight in competition to small consultants.

You have to be very careful about not using any of your employer’s resources to promote your business. If any employer’s resources are used in your side business that is unethical conduct.

For example

Looking up something at work or taking home a reference book to look it up at home.

Taking phone calls related to business at work.

Even spending time thinking about a business problem when you are supposed to be thinking about your work.

Giving out moonlighting business cards while being paid for your time (i.e. at an employer paid conference for example.)



Since most business is done during normal business hours then how can you service your clients ethically while your employer is paying for those same hours for you to do your job.


If you want to be a consultant then quit your day job, get the necessary advise spend the necessary money to hang out your own shingle and become a consultant full time.


Rick Kitson MBA P.Eng

Construction Project Management
From conception to completion
www.kitsonengineering.com

RE: What does it take to make moonlighting work?

(OP)
RDK, y

You basically cut and paste the same post over and over again throughout these forums.  I have received your message, as has everyone else one these boards.  I don't know what motivates your sentiments, but whatever it is I need some in the form of a breakfast snack.

I really don't appreciate you telling me that I have to quit my job to consult on a weekend. Clearly I do not have to quit my job to do this, although that is what you would like me to do for whatever real reasons.

80% of your post is based on contrived assumptions about my potential behavior.  The other 20% you are just telling me what to do as it would best suit your businees from a competitive standpoint.

If I happen to learn something reading a book at work, and I can use this information outside of work... horray for me. This is not 'stealing time' from my company.  By your rationale, if I learn something on my free time that I can use at work, then I should send my boss an invoice for the time I spent learning this.

I also think you need to stop generalizing.  You are making me look like some kind of an weasle, when in reality I am asking innocent questions about a legitimate proposition.

Let me ask, for example: If someone is building their home in an adjacent county and needs a percolation test performed... You are saying that I cant perform this test and write up the report on the weekend without quitting my full time job?  

Or a small engineering firm is doing some subdivision plans for a nearby project (outside of the county I work in) and they ask me if I would want to do the drianage study for them... if they have 4 weeks to finish the plans, but don't want the added hassle of doing the drainage study, you're saying that I can't work on this during nights and weekends wihout quitting my full-time job?

It's fine to be cynical, but its unfair to stifle every thread on these boards becuase of your obsession.





In direct response to your comments...


"As someone who has ran a small consulting business, I think that it is unethical to moonlight in competition to small consultants."

I am sorry you feel that way.


"You have to be very careful about not using any of your employer’s resources to promote your business. If any employer’s resources are used in your side business that is unethical conduct.

For example

Looking up something at work or taking home a reference book to look it up at home.

Taking phone calls related to business at work.

Even spending time thinking about a business problem when you are supposed to be thinking about your work.

Giving out moonlighting business cards while being paid for your time (i.e. at an employer paid conference for example.)
"

I give you my word, I will not break any rules.  You may sleep tonight.


"Since most business is done during normal business hours then how can you service your clients ethically while your employer is paying for those same hours for you to do your job."

Well I don't intend on taking work that would require attention during normal "businees hours".  Luckily for me, I have email and voicemail at home.  I appreciate your concerns regarding my potential attention to clients... but if you are convinced that I would not be able to maintain a working relationship with any client, then wouldn't this be advantageous to my competition?


"If you want to be a consultant then quit your day job, get the necessary advise spend the necessary money to hang out your own shingle and become a consultant full time."

This last sentance is an island since everything you stated above it is invalid in my specific situation.  For me, there is no reason to do this.



I apologize for being snide, and for posting such a lengthy response. However, the primary reason I was compelled to start this thread was becuase you, RDK, had personally derailed every other thread on this topic.

Swertet,

I will take your advice and crunch the numbers on my own.  I was posting here first in an attempt to get a ballpark idea prior to diving fully into a prospectus.

Once I get some estimates I will post the information here.

RE: What does it take to make moonlighting work?

Geosavy
I agree with you.  My previous post was just to point out that the politics in city and county goverments can be hazardous.
After hours it's nobodys business what you do (within reason).  If you get a part time job at Home Depot nobody would say anything ( even RDK).  Why sell hours at Home depot when you have more valuabe time to sell.
In additions to RDKs warningsI would add:
Don't use anything you learn on your moonlighting job in you primary place of employment.

RE: What does it take to make moonlighting work?

Allow me to rephrase the warning in (in my opinion) a more appropriate manner...

Do not use "insider information" learned while working with one employee while working on jobs from another employer.  Yes, it's obvious, but is often times done by accident (and in the majority of those cases the slip-up is benign).

However, feel free to use any career-related knowledge on any job, regardless of where it was learned.  This could be a faster technique of inputting/calculating data, it could be a previously unknown publicly available program, a source of publicly available data, a new vendor/consultant, etc.  As long as none of the above are patented by one of your employers or specifically listed as a non-disclosure in something you've signed, you should feel free to use it whenever it suits your purpose.  If a coworker shows me how Excel can graph data I was previously looking at as pure numbers, I'm going to use that whenever the appropriate opportunity arises, not just at that particular job.  If a client introduces me to a program I never knew about that was useful, I will purchase a copy to use on my next job.

Just because you learn something at job 'A' doesn't necessarily mean they own exclusive rights to it.

Dan - Owner
http://www.Hi-TecDesigns.com

RE: What does it take to make moonlighting work?

That last sentence should have been like this.

Don't use anything you learn on your moonlighting job in you primary place of employment  <%A)}.  



 

RE: What does it take to make moonlighting work?

I think letting your employer know you are moonlighting is the upfront thing to do.  Nothing worse than having the CEO of the jurisdiction (mayor, administrator, city manager, etc.) have to deal with a surprise.  When I was building official of my town, I did work on the side outside my jurisdiction with both my supervisor and his (city manager) aware I had a corporation.  

What I do is aobut $5000 a year of billable to pay for my cell, internet, buy some toys like CAD, computers, servers, etc., and get the tools ready for the day I strike out on my own.  Meantime, my expenses exceed my income and I reduce my tax liability (S-corporation).  

Just something to think about.

Don Phillips
http://worthingtonengineering.com

RE: What does it take to make moonlighting work?

Geosavvy/RDK,

You both have great comments and as someone who did moonlighting consulting prior to starting my own consulting firm I'd like to add my comments.

I did my consulting with the permission and even encouraging of my manager (i did not work for a consulting engineer). He thought it was a great way to technically broaden myself and offered that I could use company resources (texts, codes, etc).  There was no potential client conflict and he knew I would not take work on when we were busy. I actually did very little of this because it just wasn't worth it.  It is difficult to seek the work out (I helped one local company w/ overflow and that was about it) and because you cannot commit to big tasks the level of work (in a technical sense) is rather boring.  I eventually started my own company and am glad I did.

It can be frustrating when someone "moonlighting" who has lower overhead (many of their benefits, such as medical and disability insurance are paid by their employer plus they borrow books from work, most often with permission of their employer, etc) tries to get work.  However, that is life and there is always competition so I have to deal with it and make my own advantages. Generally, they only get one or two jobs and then blow schedule because of their regular work and it balances out.  

At the same time, I use an engineer who moonlights to help me with certain tasks which he is highly specialized in.  He has his own software (FEA), computers, resources, etc. I make this my competitive advantage when I can.  I make sure he has all his insurance, is licensed, my E&O company is aware, etc.

In otherwords, there is a definite place in the market for moonlighting consultants. They have a responsibility to upfront with their employer and their clients. At the same time, I can help my clients by utilizing moonlighting consultants too. That is good for my business and my client.  

Geosavvy, getting back to your question, it really isn't all that expensive to start.  E&O does not have to be terribly expensive (depends on your billings), zero payroll workers comp (if allowed in your state) plus USD1,000,000 general liability and auto won't be too bad.  Most drawings can be done on AutoCad LT (<USD1,000), use a cell as your business phone, a PLLC is less than USD1,000 to start in my state, state building codes, etc. Zdas04 covers this side of it very well.

I agree that you have to be as "transparent" as possible. Let your employer and your clients know what you are doing.

Finally, if working on your own is something you think you want research it and if it looks good do it.  The moonlighting thing really doesn't give you a full flavor of what it takes.

Best of luck.

RE: What does it take to make moonlighting work?

To make it worthwhile, i,e. risk and reward fully compensated, you need to charge about 3 to 4 times your normal salary. $150.00/hr is worth the trouble, easily achievable if you are experienced.

Don't take any assignment by the hour.

Put aside additional time for site visits, when following through during construction services. You will need official time OFF from work to address a field issue during business hours. That means that your vacation time at your normal job will erode quickly. I found that field surveys are my worst enemies in moonlighting. I had to use a week of unpaid vacation time last year.

If you stamp anything, you should charge $100.00+/hr plus  multiplier, just like a company would do. I'd say that if you use licensed software, you are no longer a moonlighter, you are a business.

Go for it, the money is really good. But be warned, if you do more that 12 hours/week, you will be burned quickly. Boy, that extra money saves a lot of problems, no more worries about high childcare costs, high car payments while driving a new car, etc..

I never agreed with RDK, but I must say that he is right is some ways, that at one time or another, you will use your normal time at the office tending to your own business (answering the cell phone, checking personnal e-mails, setting up appointments, etc.). On the other hand, I used experience gained from moonlighting to apply on my daily job, which benfits the boss.

RE: What does it take to make moonlighting work?

I know of a rather good engineer who is moonlighting from his day job. I approached him with a potential project that required expertise that my employer didn't have, but that he had. Although I had confidence in his skills, I doubted those of his employer. Unfortunately, it appeared that the time & schedule demands of the potential project were greater than what a moonlighter could provide. We had to subcontract the job to another formal company. I offer this as an example of the potential difficulties with moonlighting.

RE: What does it take to make moonlighting work?

(OP)
Thanks for all of the replies.  I certainly understand that big projects could never receive the attention that the should during 'off hours'.

Once again, my itentions were more for things like percolations tests for indivisual homeowners, small drainage studies subbed out from the primary civil, or any other various smaller tasks subbed out from a bigger firm... or other work generated from private individuals.

I know when I worked in geotechnical consulting, we kept a couple of phone numbers on hand of outside engineers that would take small residential work that we were unwilling to do.

There's always someone who needs a footing inspeciton report for an addition, or a percolation test report for a septic system.  My goal was to determine if it would be feasible to provide any of these services on the weekends.

Thanks again for all of the advice. I found it to be very useful.

RE: What does it take to make moonlighting work?

Our firm does not strictly prohibit moonlighting, because as many of you have said, what you want to do on your time is your business.  What does affect your employer is how much time you spend during your regular business day working on your "side jobs".  When you do, you are stealing. You will end up using company computer equipment and software to design plans, office plotters, burning CD's, reference books, phone and internet service. Are you going to reimburse your employer for the expense and your unearned income? We had one guy that used our Spec-Link program to create architectural specifications for a side job.  He spent 2 weeks of our time, took our money, used our software, printers and copier.  He is not eligible for re-hire.  His $2,500 side job cost him a salary of $105,000, 100% medical insurance for his family paid by the company,401K/profit sharing and 3 wks paid vacation per year.  Go figure.

RE: What does it take to make moonlighting work?

Unless there is a specific exclusion mentioned regarding this by your employer, the only problem I could see is a possible "Conflict of Interest".  Even though you may be in a smaller market than your employer, and, technically a different one, although that is an arguable point, the potential for him seeing you as a competitor is very real.  

If you pursue it, do so knowing that you very well may be going out on your own.  And in doing so, you may burn a bridge that may have been valuable to you.  Hopefully, by that time, you will have a viable network, capable of supporting your lifestyle and that of your family.  I had to do just that within one month, but had 5 years to prepare for it.  It worked.

Good luck.

Mike McCann
McCann Engineering

Red Flag This Post

Please let us know here why this post is inappropriate. Reasons such as off-topic, duplicates, flames, illegal, vulgar, or students posting their homework.

Red Flag Submitted

Thank you for helping keep Eng-Tips Forums free from inappropriate posts.
The Eng-Tips staff will check this out and take appropriate action.

Reply To This Thread

Posting in the Eng-Tips forums is a member-only feature.

Click Here to join Eng-Tips and talk with other members! Already a Member? Login


Resources

Low-Volume Rapid Injection Molding With 3D Printed Molds
Learn methods and guidelines for using stereolithography (SLA) 3D printed molds in the injection molding process to lower costs and lead time. Discover how this hybrid manufacturing process enables on-demand mold fabrication to quickly produce small batches of thermoplastic parts. Download Now
Design for Additive Manufacturing (DfAM)
Examine how the principles of DfAM upend many of the long-standing rules around manufacturability - allowing engineers and designers to place a part’s function at the center of their design considerations. Download Now
Taking Control of Engineering Documents
This ebook covers tips for creating and managing workflows, security best practices and protection of intellectual property, Cloud vs. on-premise software solutions, CAD file management, compliance, and more. Download Now

Close Box

Join Eng-Tips® Today!

Join your peers on the Internet's largest technical engineering professional community.
It's easy to join and it's free.

Here's Why Members Love Eng-Tips Forums:

Register now while it's still free!

Already a member? Close this window and log in.

Join Us             Close