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Working in your own firm, or for somebody else - can't decide?
3

Working in your own firm, or for somebody else - can't decide?

Working in your own firm, or for somebody else - can't decide?

(OP)
I'm in a position to work in a small, private engineering firm that's 22% owned by my parent. The firm is progressing nicely, seems to be working in a perspective field (agricultural equipment, seeming to grow with all the whole wheat/ecological production hype), it offers good training and working possibilities, a secure job and a decent wage. The flaws are that it's situated in a backward area, offers little possibilities of advancement once I learn doing my job (apart of eventually becoming a co-owner and assuming a managing position, which has been openly suggested since they'd start training me for that right off), and seems to want a contract in blood that I'll not retire but die from there.

At present I'm working at an institute in a college, which is a temporary work until I make up my mind about work, which is very difficult. As the grass always seems greener somewhere else, I'd like to change jobs (and cities, possibily countries) for a while to see what suits me best, not get employed now and become a constant acessory in a firm where my salary will be just as constant. However I am not sure if it's a good ide, throwing away a fact that I have a chance to work for myself, not for some boss who'll just seek to exploit my services and try to pay me as little as possible. In my position, what would you do?

RE: Working in your own firm, or for somebody else - can't decide?

It doesn't matter what I would do in your position. That type of advise, I find, usually doesn't calm my doubts. And, obvisously, you have some doubts about working in the family business. I always heed my own doubts - that is why nature gave us doubts.

You need to look into your self, and figure out what you should do.

"Do not worry about your problems with mathematics, I assure you mine are far greater."   
Albert Einstein
Have you read FAQ731-376 to make the best use of Eng-Tips Forums?

RE: Working in your own firm, or for somebody else - can't decide?

Ashereng:

The noun  is ADVICE .

Buy a dictionary, keep it nearby and USE it. Webster's New World Dictionary of American English is recommended, and Webster's Collegiate Dictionary.

RE: Working in your own firm, or for somebody else - can't decide?

You are correct! "That type of advice, ..."

"Do not worry about your problems with mathematics, I assure you mine are far greater."   
Albert Einstein
Have you read FAQ731-376 to make the best use of Eng-Tips Forums?

RE: Working in your own firm, or for somebody else - can't decide?

A number of local companies in my area refuse to extend the contract of apprentices when they have served their time.  They believe that it is necessary to first spread their wings, go else where pick up new skills, knowledge, expertise etc before bringing this back.
I'm sure the same follows for engineers, technologists etc.
Maybe by getting experience else where you may be able to improve your family business at a later date.

Hope this makes sense

RE: Working in your own firm, or for somebody else - can't decide?

If you just consider it, it is enough to advise you ti go somewhere else, no doubt about that!

You can broaden your view and if you decide to come back, you'll be smarter!

sunshine

RE: Working in your own firm, or for somebody else - can't decide?

I agree with bazaka.  Gaining experience elswhere will help not only you, but your current firm as well, should you choose to return.  I deal with alot of family owned companies.  Many second and third generation 'owners' tend to develope tunnel vision.  Good luck.

RE: Working in your own firm, or for somebody else - can't decide?

(OP)
Thanx everyone! You pretty much confirmed what I thought about the subject.

However, I'd also like to ask you one other question. How do you treat/would you treat such an engineer (owner's child/relative) if you got one at your workplace? Cosimo mentioned these people developing a "tunnel vision", how about everything else? I noticed a lot of respect being shopwn to me on the account no one wanting to anger "the boss's kid" what with all the strings attached, and if I'm not treated like everyone else, I can't hope to learn and advance like everyone else - and my goal is to be a good engineer, not take some managing position and feed off of other people's work. Could working elsewhere and making a name for myself first, so to speak, rectify this problem?

RE: Working in your own firm, or for somebody else - can't decide?

Everyone treats the boss differently, because they know he/she's the boss.

If you want everyone to treat you as just another employee - it's not going to happen. They know who you are - the boss' kid, and probably the next boss.

If you want everyone to treat you fairly, with due respect to what you can do based on merit, then do the same with them. Keep a low profile (as best you can), keep discussion based on "technical", "logical" and "objective" basis, and you will succeed in fostering a meritocracy environment when they think/deal with you.

Trying to ignore who you are is disingenious, and problematic. Acknowledge who you are, and work towards a fair and open mindedness so that others feel that they can disagree with you and not offend.

"Do not worry about your problems with mathematics, I assure you mine are far greater."   
Albert Einstein
Have you read FAQ731-376 to make the best use of Eng-Tips Forums?

RE: Working in your own firm, or for somebody else - can't decide?

TurbulentFluid (Mechanical)
As someone who worked as the bosses son.I can tell you , the only, way to avoid the syndrome you are describing is to work through your training at another company.
  Then when you do, come back into the company, you will have more respect. However you will still be the bosses son, you will never get away from that.
Brian Evans.

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