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Shear strenght of dry Portland Cement
2

Shear strenght of dry Portland Cement

Shear strenght of dry Portland Cement

(OP)
I am looking for the shear strength of dry Portland Cement. In other words it's shear strength as is sits in the bag before being mixed with water.

TIA

www.engtran.com
www.niswug.org

RE: Shear strenght of dry Portland Cement

I would suppose a lot depends on the grind - how fine it has been produced to.  Any info on that as this would be one controlling factor?  In India (and I think UK), they have OPC33, OPC43 and OPC53 - with the later being much more finely ground.

RE: Shear strenght of dry Portland Cement

My ancient Reynolds (Reinforced Concrete Designer's Handboook) gives the following for contained cement.

Cement Static fine Theta 10 degrees, Angle of repose 15 degrees

Static coarse  Theta 18 degrees Angle of repose 20 degrees.
Density 1440kg/m3

Air-agitated Theta 0 and density 1120kg/m3

RE: Shear strenght of dry Portland Cement

(OP)
StephenA,

Can you give the citation for Reynolds? It would be appreciated.  pipe

www.engtran.com
www.niswug.org

RE: Shear strenght of dry Portland Cement

The book is called Reinforced Concrete Designer's Handbook Seventh Edition (Revised) by Chas. E. Reynolds BSc. (Eng), C.Eng, F.I.C.E. published by Cement and Concrete Assocation (first edition 1932, Seventh Edition 1972).

It has been revised many times since!

RE: Shear strenght of dry Portland Cement

(OP)

Quote (BigH):

I don't understand what they mean by angle of surcharge which is approximately 1/2 of this - perhaps saturated angle of repose?

Your link got me to searching and I found this for example:

Trajectories Classification

Depending on who you look at the angle of repose can be anything from 44 degrees to maybe -15.

www.engtran.com
www.niswug.org

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