Smart questions
Smart answers
Smart people
INTELLIGENT WORK FORUMS
FOR ENGINEERING PROFESSIONALS

Member Login




Remember Me
Forgot Password?
Join Us!

Come Join Us!

Are you an
Engineering professional?
Join Eng-Tips now!
  • Talk With Other Members
  • Be Notified Of Responses
    To Your Posts
  • Keyword Search
  • One-Click Access To Your
    Favorite Forums
  • Automated Signatures
    On Your Posts
  • Best Of All, It's Free!

Join Eng-Tips
*Eng-Tips's functionality depends on members receiving e-mail. By joining you are opting in to receive e-mail.

Posting Guidelines

Promoting, selling, recruiting, coursework and thesis posting is forbidden.
Jobs from Indeed

Link To This Forum!

Partner Button
Add Stickiness To Your Site By Linking To This Professionally Managed Technical Forum.
Just copy and paste the
code below into your site.

sprintcar (Mechanical) (OP)
17 May 04 8:05
Being a yankee living in the south (yes, I know there's another 'name') I thought that a translation of southern engineering terms might be appropriate here. I've actually heard these.

Please add any that might help us all communicate - just include the translation.  Who knows, maybe Jeff Foxworthy will be interested...

CONCENTRISICAL - 2 circles on the same center
OVALATED - Circle that becomes out of round
WALLERED OUT - When the fit becomes too loose
CRASSION - Rust or corrosion


Keep the wheels on the ground
Bob
showshine@aol.com

Helpful Member!  CoryPad (Materials)
17 May 04 9:02
ADHEDE - to make multiple objects stick together

THATBIGAROUND - semi-quantitative dimensioning of a part in which the speaker makes a circle with his/her forefinger and thumb that corresponds to the object in question

YAY BIG/YAY LONG - semi-quantitative dimensioning of a part in which the speaker uses one or two of his/her hands to identify the size of the object in question

Regards,

Cory

Please see FAQ731-376 for tips on how to make the best use of Eng-Tips Fora.

EnglishMuffin (Mechanical)
18 May 04 18:08
Dunno - I've heard New Englanders say "yay big" etc. Maybe it's spreading.
CoryPad (Materials)
18 May 04 18:12
I forgot a good one:

CADDY-WOMPUS - (adjective) description of an object that is not level, plumb, and generally lacking orientation with adjacent space-time.

Regards,

Cory

Please see FAQ731-376 for tips on how to make the best use of Eng-Tips Fora.

EnglishMuffin (Mechanical)
18 May 04 18:19
I thought it was "kitty wompus"(?). And then there's "kitty corner" - ie "opposite corner", so maybe I'm getting mixed up.
digger242j (Civil/Environmental)
18 May 04 22:03
Where I grew up (and still am--Southwestern PA), I've mostly heard "catty-corner", although occasionally I've run into people who use "kitty-corner". I've never heard "kitty-wompus, but I have heard "catty-wompus".

As far as the length and width of something that's "yay big"--that would be (accompanied by appropriate hand gestures), "about Yie by Yie"....
EnglishMuffin (Mechanical)
18 May 04 22:34
kitty corner wins over catty corner - 49% to 30%.

http://hcs.harvard.edu/~golder/dialect/staticmaps/q_76.html

But in this dialect survey, they are claiming that for some people (.13%) kitty corner and kitty wampus mean the same thing, which is news to me. Can't find either of them in my American slang dictionary for some reason.
ml13 (Structural)
19 May 04 12:10
"Masonary"--masonry
"Joistus"--Joists
"Sheeting"--Sheathing

True southerners will shorten caddy-wompus to caddy-womp.  
rmw (Mechanical)
19 May 04 13:37
Freezone for freon.

rmw
Snork (Mechanical)
26 May 04 17:06
And don't forget:

gozinta - as in 2 gozinta 4 twice

and

halfagain - as in 3 is halfagain 2
MarauderX (Mechanical)
27 May 04 11:41
RIGHT FAR - "Close..."

CURVY CURVY - turn or bend, or multiple turns or bends in ductwork or piping.

DINGTWIZZLED - confused, upset, frustrated, and/or catty-wompus.

MASHBUTTON or MASHBUT - To press a button or other lever to activate appropriate device, such as a disconnect switch.  

rmw (Mechanical)
27 May 04 23:52
ScottyMc,

I think it is hafagin.  There is no "l" nor "a" after the "g" in the word, if said correctly, maybe even haffagin.  And, the more I roll it around in my mind, it is haffagiun.  You definately have to have two syllables after the "g" to be a true redneck.

rmw
Helpful Member!(3)  sprintcar (Mechanical) (OP)
28 May 04 7:34
Spent some time in Mfg yesterday...

WELT - (welded)- "them 2 parts is WELT together"
Weldeddid - same meaning, different operator

Windup Scale - tape measure

See It - verb meaning sit -  "Ya'll See It that part on the machine"

Keep the wheels on the ground
Bob
showshine@aol.com

metman (Materials)
28 May 04 21:10
richeer---meaning pretty close by.

Jesus is THE life,
Leonard

Bung (Electrical)
29 May 04 5:58
I have heard tell of "Wayne's coating" and "rot iron".  Both require reading with a North American accent before it becomes clear what these are (I will leave it to you to puzzle out - the rot iron took me a while...) (with thanks to New Scientist).

Bung
Life is non-linear...

ivymike (Mechanical)
1 Jun 04 12:40
those are easy enough.  I have both in a bathroom that I recently built.
ivymike (Mechanical)
1 Jun 04 12:44
ScottMc,

gozinta - what water does through a guzzins, usually before it does the opposite through a guzzouts.  In vehicle design, properly placing all the guzzins and guzzouts can take quite a lot of time.

-I
Snork (Mechanical)
1 Jun 04 17:28
Inhiding

I work on vehicle design so I appreciate what you are saying, but it is amazing how many people don't.

At one of my early jobs I was assigned to work on underhood cooling and one of the managers took me aside to give me some pointers.  Most important, he said, was to make sure you had a way to let the air out, you couldn't just let it in or your cooling would be poor.  I learned that this was actually tested.

zdas04 (Mechanical)
1 Jun 04 17:38
ScottMc,
Actually tested?  As in a wind tunnel, or as in caveat emptor?

David
Helpful Member!(2)  TheTick (Mechanical)
2 Jun 04 9:07
Milwaukee (WI) engineering terminology:

Chicago bolt (n.)
1. A fictitious fastener (screw ot bolt) with a jog in the shank to allow the fastener to pass through misaligned holes
2. An undersized screw or bolt used when misalignment of holes does not permit use of the correct size screw or bolt

Due to illness, the part of The Tick will be played by... The Tick.
http://www.EsoxRepublic.com

Helpful Member!(2)  ctopher (Mechanical)
2 Jun 04 10:00
Good one Tick.
The note on the dwg would be "Pound to fit, paint to match".
jmw (Industrial)
2 Jun 04 10:31
I knew that as "file to shape, bash to fit and paint to cover."

Another favourite expression, "don't force it - use a bigger hammer."

JMW
www.viscoanalyser.com
Eng-Tips: Pro bono publico, by engineers, for engineers.

Please see FAQ731-376 for tips on how to make the best use of Eng-Tips Fora.

zdas04 (Mechanical)
2 Jun 04 12:06
jmw,
Actually that last one is something that everyone should learn and employ.  When I was working in a steam plant, it was frequently necessary to "persuade" massive objects into small movements.  A small hammer would seldom allow the control needed (you would have to swing too hard to impart adequate force).  A "bigger hammer" often was able to shift the object with a smaller proportion of the operators available strength and gave much better control.

Even in dumb-sounding sayings, there is sometimes a valid genesis.

David
mloew (Automotive)
2 Jun 04 13:21
David,

Not dumb sounding at all; the description is accurate. I call all my hammers "persuasion devises". Of course, I call my wife "spousal unit".

Best regards,

Matthew Ian Loew
"I don't grow up. In me is the small child of my early days" -- M.C. Escher

Please see FAQ731-376 for tips on how to make the best use of Eng-Tips Fora.

jmw (Industrial)
2 Jun 04 14:55
I was visiting a trial site in Portugal for a new viscometer when the (German)engineer wanted to remove it from the pipe for inspection.
It was secured by a 1.5" hex nut and rather than look for an adjustable spanner (Monkey-wrench?) he reached for a hammer.

"We call it an English spanner." he said with a wry grin.

0

JMW
www.viscoanalyser.com
Eng-Tips: Pro bono publico, by engineers, for engineers.

Please see FAQ731-376 for tips on how to make the best use of Eng-Tips Fora.

TheTick (Mechanical)
2 Jun 04 15:32
Wow!  One more for my upcoming book on great German humor.  Now I'm up to 4 pages :)
blutfort (Mechanical)
2 Jun 04 18:14
Silver Hammer = Any large crescent wrench closer than the hammer in the back of the truck.
RCH = Unit of measure.  Very Small.  R stands for Red.  H stands for Hair.  I'll let you figure out the C.
Southern Chrome = Duct Tape
metman (Materials)
2 Jun 04 18:58
My friend David, a design engineer, was being criticised for pounding on a rather delicate piece of manufacturing machinery with a hammer.  David protested, "I did not hit it with a hammer -- I was using pliers."

In some parts of the South, that would be "...I was usin plars.

Jesus is THE life,
Leonard

rmw (Mechanical)
3 Jun 04 0:34
jmw,

I once worked in a production machining plant where lathes were turning rough forgings held on a mandrel, and which had several tools active in the work piece at a time.  It was called rough turn.  The tools, which were held in the tool holder by hex nuts on studs, had to be changed often, and the operators used hammers instead of wrenches to loosen and re tighten their tool holders.  There weren't even any wrenches anywhere to be found at the work station.

I learned the technique from them, and often, to this day, prefer the use of a "persuasion device" instead of a wrench.  I think I will go relate this story to my "spousal unit".  (good one mloew)

rmw

rmw
ctopher (Mechanical)
3 Jun 04 0:43
'puter

(the pc on your desk)
ctopher (Mechanical)
3 Jun 04 0:47
Helpful Member!(2)  ScottyUK (Electrical)
3 Jun 04 5:16
Mloew,

Try these acronyms out on your 'spousal unit':


W worship
O our
M master's
E every
N need

If we never hear from you again, we'll know you have tried it. I have too strong a sense of self-preservation to test it on my partner!!




------------------------------

If we learn from our mistakes,
I'm getting a great education!
metman (Materials)
3 Jun 04 18:56
ctopher,
'puter is what my grandaughter calls it.  She is in speech therapy.

I failed every question that I tried on Redneck eng exam.  does this mean I don't qualify or that I am a prime candidate.

Jesus is THE life,
Leonard

ctopher (Mechanical)
3 Jun 04 18:59
Nothing to worry about.
Exams don't mean much to rednecks anyway.
ckenny (Electrical)
4 Jun 04 14:48
Mechanic on the line: Hand me a screwdriver.
Mechanic at toolbox: Phillips or common?
Mechanic on the line: Ether one, I am going to as a hammer.
MintJulep (Mechanical)
4 Jun 04 19:44
Going off-topic a bit:

In Japan a Phillips screw driver is a "Plus Driver", and a straight screw driver is a "Minus Driver", used even if the rest of the discussion is in Japanese.
vpl (Nuclear)
5 Jun 04 0:55
ScottyUK,

I showed your initialisms to my "spousal unit".  HE thought they were real funny!

But, boy, is this thread off-topic!  Should'nt a new one be started on "the best tool to use for any given job"  

P.S, I vote for staplers and scissors as multi-purpose tools.  The former makes a good hammer and the latter a good screw-driver and pliers.

Patricia Lougheed

Please see FAQ731-376 for tips on how to make the best use of the Eng-Tips Forums.

TheTick (Mechanical)
5 Jun 04 1:15
My sister can tell you a story about using scissors as a circuit tester.  At least she lived to tell the tale.
sprintcar (Mechanical) (OP)
7 Jun 04 16:23
the beat goes on

MYTHOLOGY - Wayz ya'll do stuff (Methodology)

Keep the wheels on the ground
Bob
showshine@aol.com

rerig (Aerospace)
15 Jun 04 11:08
ScottyUK,

Used that one on the wife!

Doc. says, no perminant damage to the left eye.
Need new glasses though.

Found another use for a cutting board!!!

Rerig.

(You can't cut me off...you don't know where I'm getting it!)
Helpful Member!  sms (Mechanical)
17 Jun 04 12:33
Here is a new one I came across, kryshtilized: Anything that has cracked and broken must have kryshtilized first. Prounounced like crystalized, but with a large wad of chewing tobacco in your mouth.
BJC (Electrical)
18 Jun 04 2:08
Note on drawing:  HTFFSPTM  ( hammer to fit, file smooth, paint to match)

After watching Troy a couple of weeks ago I remembered the Millihelen,  a unit we use to use in school as opposed to the 1 - 10 scale.  
TheTick (Mechanical)
18 Jun 04 7:43
Millihelen = face that would launch one ship?
jmw (Industrial)
18 Jun 04 8:34
I am not familiar with the Troy system.
What is the "avoirdupois" equivalent?

http://www.hyperdictionary.com/dictionary/avoirdupois
http://www.fact-index.com/a/av/avoirdupois.html

JMW
www.viscoanalyser.com
Eng-Tips: Pro bono publico, by engineers, for engineers.

Please see FAQ731-376 for tips on how to make the best use of Eng-Tips Fora.

BJC (Electrical)
18 Jun 04 10:23

The tick

It's the amount of beauty required to launch one ship.
(Helen of Troy being the emost beautiful woman in the world) caused a thousand to be launched.

http://www.hyperdictionary.com/computing/millihelen
ScottyUK (Electrical)
18 Jun 04 11:40
BJC,

Explain Queen Elizabeth the Second and her involvement in launching ships? The requirements have clearly changed!



------------------------------

If we learn from our mistakes,
I'm getting a great education!

jmw (Industrial)
18 Jun 04 11:46
Actually, it is just another excuse to dispose of champagne without having to drink it. There is a limit on how much of the stuff can be sprayed over race fans at motor car and bike racing events.

An important function as the number of people who can be pursuaded to drink the stuff, despite PT Barnums famous adage, is insufficient to keep up with the supply.

I think they'd let anyone launch ships. In fact, it might be an idea to have group launchings, not one person launching a group of ships, but a group pf people (C list celebs) to launch each ship. Given the increased size of ships today, this is the only way to match the champagne consumption to the tonnage launched.

QEII obviously can't launch enough of them by herself.

JMW
www.viscoanalyser.com
Eng-Tips: Pro bono publico, by engineers, for engineers.

Please see FAQ731-376 for tips on how to make the best use of Eng-Tips Fora.

IRstuff (Aerospace)
18 Jun 04 12:10
QEII was actually much better looking when she ascended the throne.

TTFN

crossframe (Structural)
18 Jun 04 12:41
I'm sure a lot of us were!
jmw (Industrial)
18 Jun 04 12:43
I wish I could say the same but I never ascended to any throne.

JMW
www.viscoanalyser.com
Eng-Tips: Pro bono publico, by engineers, for engineers.

Please see FAQ731-376 for tips on how to make the best use of Eng-Tips Fora.

IRstuff (Aerospace)
18 Jun 04 12:47
While you and she might have been better looking when she ascended the throne, I would have been a single cell with half of my chromosomes, so it's arguable in my case.

TTFN

metman (Materials)
18 Jun 04 18:22
jmw,
Ain't you never heard of the poem and song "Ode To The Little brown Shack Out Back?" I think the poem is by Browning or Longfellow.

Jesus is THE life,
Leonard

ScottyUK (Electrical)
19 Jun 04 4:07
Ain't you never heard of...

What kind of expression is that to be using in the Language / Grammar Skill forum??

------------------------------

If we learn from our mistakes,
I'm getting a great education!

sms (Mechanical)
19 Jun 04 19:16
In a Redneck Engineering Fora, that is an extremely  appropriate expression. I reckon it were specially good, when that ol boy was fixen to tell about a lil brown shack out back. Ceptin it owtta been lil brown shack out yonder....
ihg (Chemical)
29 Jun 04 1:52
Thanks jmw. Perhaps the reason jewelry is weighed in Troy units has a connection with Helen of.

Avoirdupois
The avoirdupois system is a system of weights defining terms such as pound and ounce. It is the everyday system of weight used in the United States, and was used in the United Kingdom and elsewhere until metrication. It is considered more modern and standardised than the alternative troy or "apothecary" system.

Does this definition strike anyone as a mite odd. But then, I find folk refering to it as the Imperial system, dating back to George III. Even the UK finally agreed that the French were onto a good idea.
metman (Materials)
29 Jun 04 14:12
Maybe for this thread it should be spelled avewahdupwee?

Jesus is THE life,
Leonard

mrainey (Industrial)
3 Jul 04 8:40
Where I live:

We machine shafts on a LAY

Before we can use a hand drill we have to PLUG IT UP

When it gets dark suddenly we change the LAHT BUB

Manufacturing Freeware and Shareware
http://mrainey.freeservers.com

Qshake (Structural)
3 Jul 04 13:04
Being of a certain wonderful vintage, I've heard many of those and have certainly learned some new ones!  

Here's some from the structural/civil realm...

Footer...usually a small footing for a residential wall.  It's common pronunciation is more like "Foot-her".

Coluuuum...a vertical support in a building or bridge.  The pronunciation is "Col-you-mmm.

I've heard of structural ironworkers dreadedly refer to using the "Monday".  Or when all else fails in persuading drift pins and (forbid) bolts inbetween several plys of steel, they'll call for the "Monday".  

The "Monday" is a monster of a "beater" or sledgehammer.  While most typical sledges on a job are 8 pounders, the Monday is a whopping 12 pounder.  The best I could figure is that long ago some ironworkers would forget things over the weekend and pick-up the Monday, thinking it was a typical 8 pounder only groan, under the added weight, "its gotta be Monday!".

Anyway, it doesn't sound like much more weight until you give it a go and remember most bolt points aren't oriented on a horizontal plane but a vertical one which means you're swinging sideways!

Regards,
Qshake

Eng-Tips Forums:Real Solutions for Real Problems Really Quick.

leanne (Electrical)
6 Jul 04 18:14
I received directions to a July 4th party. "At the end of the street - it's the only lot with a rod iron fence. "

Quote (MLoew):

Not dumb sounding at all; the description is accurate. I call all my hammers "persuasion devises". Of course, I call my wife "spousal unit".  

I call my hammers "spousal attitude adjusters". Now, where is that left-handed monkey wranch (sic) & wahr straightner (double sic)?

(snicker)
DwattedWabbit (Civil/Environmental)
12 Aug 04 8:48
Having been raised in northern New England, having lived in the South for six years, and now living in southern New England, I repeatedly run into the misconception that rednecks inhabit the South exclusively.  I couldn't say about other parts of the US, but I have found rednecks native both to New England and to the South.  They has some individual distinctions, but for the most part tend to be rural residents.
JNieuwsma (Mechanical)
12 Aug 04 10:16
I once heard about a flywheel from a regular car (designed for,what, about 8000 rpm maximum?) that was used in a home-built monster truck which revved past 20,000 rpm. The flywheel exploded. Casualties ensued, and then of course the lawsuits. Subsequent investigation revealed that a spec for moster truck flywheels did in fact exist, and specified flywheel material to be "duck tail iron".
jmw (Industrial)
12 Aug 04 18:58
..and held together with duck tape?



(duct tape for the educated)

JMW
www.viscoanalyser.com
Eng-Tips: Pro bono publico, by engineers, for engineers.

Please see FAQ731-376 for tips on how to make the best use of Eng-Tips Fora.

rnd2 (Materials)
13 Aug 04 6:21
7. A man owns a house and 3.7 acres of land in a hollow with an average slope of 15%. The man has 5 children. Can each of the children place a mobile home on the man's land?
Answer:
Yessir show can. R cain't say fshowr ef they can liveinm.
Mah't b ginst reguelayshons.
ivymike (Mechanical)
13 Aug 04 17:48
duck tape  Ace Hardware used to (does?) carry a brand of duct tape called "Duck Tape."  Little picture of a duck on the package, etc...
CoryPad (Materials)
16 Aug 04 22:21
ivymike,

http://www.duckproducts.com/

Regards,

Cory

Please see FAQ731-376 for tips on how to make the best use of Eng-Tips Fora.

McCormick93 (Mechanical)
25 Aug 04 13:57
My uncle, editing newspaper advertisements in Columbia, Missouri, took a call from a guy selling a Four Star Furnace.  After the ad was printed, the guy called back irate that the newspaper grossly misspelled "forced air furnace".

True
Helpful Member!  092961 (Mechanical)
25 Aug 04 18:32
How about:

PERTNEER - meaning about or approximately

Warren
Haf (Mechanical)
26 Aug 04 9:19
I always thought that "pertner" (no idea on the correct spelling) was a redneck translation of "pretty near" as in "I pertner kicked the bucket when that there twister come through my trailer park."
HgTX (Civil/Environmental)
26 Aug 04 11:21
Qshake--what's the proper pronunciation of "footer"?

Hg
NickelMet (Materials)
9 Nov 04 8:40
Just one thought, for those of us practicing engineering in the rural parts of America:

High Tech Redneck

The first time I heard this phrase, I was pierced to the soul.  But now, many years later, older and wiser, I proudly display the nom de plume on my hardhat.

~NiM
JPatten (Civil/Environmental)
9 Nov 04 9:55


Yoyo - Air impact wrench used to tighten bolts in structural steel erection.

Rattle the bolts - Tighten the bolts.

Plumb Bob - When a crane hook is not being used and is just sitting.

NickelMet (Materials)
9 Nov 04 9:57
Another defining moment for YOYO:

"What happens to the human body when a safety harness is tested at great heights."

~NiM
VeryPicky (Petroleum)
10 Nov 04 10:38
Remember what Prof. Higgins said about english language in "My Fair Lady"?
"...in America they haven't used it for years..." or something like that...

Putting Human Factor Back in Engineering

Qshake (Structural)
10 Nov 04 10:42
HgTX,

I've always used "footing" as in "For stability, Joe better improve his footing".  Yet, we use it as a noun - "Joe is designing footing no. 2"!?  Crazy, but that's the way it's been used around the Midwest for as long as I've been in the business.

Footer, of course, is often pronounced foot-her, a very distinctive second syllable and more or less a good strong southern accent to it!

Regards,
Qshake

Eng-Tips Forums:Real Solutions for Real Problems Really Quick.

evelrod (Automotive)
10 Nov 04 13:42
In truth, my speech patterns reflect my Texas origins and my writing skills, such as they are, reflect my English teacher (mother). I do get confused from time to time.  A few things that I heard, indeed, used that have not been listed here---
Beater---actually ANY hammer. Usually a short (21") handled 8, 10 and, 12lbs. sledge.
Monday---16 or 20lb. beater often with short handle(20"-30")
Stob---ya stick it in the ground with a beater.
New York---to drive a missalligned bolt with a Monday.
Drive up---rattle up, tighten-from old rivet terminology.
Mesican speed ranch---adjustable spanner
Enfadoe---reverse direction or turn around.
Bullpen---large drift pin.
Burner---skilled with a cuttintorch.
hotwrench---what a burner uses.

That'le  do for now.

Rod
CESSNA1 (Mechanical)
15 Nov 04 18:33
how about these

RATCHAIR - On this spot - put thet thin RATCHAIR.

TINSINSTOW - I ama goin to the TINSINSTOW for a chaw ah tobaccay, y'all want sompin.

GETOUTAHEER - Go way

STAND AND CHAIR - Let me hear y'all STAND AND CHAIR for duh Citadel.

ALL - everyone - We be ALL here

ALL - A lubricant - Ah change mah ALL every tin tousand miles, mo or lest.

bobcat2000 (Electrical)
8 Dec 04 14:12
How about NUCULAR for NUCLEAR?
MadMango (Mechanical)
11 Dec 04 11:13
Double-wide with a Porch- Meaning: "That's a good design/device/item."

"But what... is it good for?"
Engineer at the Advanced Computing Systems Division of IBM, 1968, commenting on the microchip.
Have you read FAQ731-376 to make the best use of Eng-Tips Forums?

NickelMet (Materials)
13 Dec 04 8:17
Just a small one:

EARTIS or AIRTIS - as in "Here it is..." or "There it is..."  You have to know the situation in order to understand the context (here or there).

~NiM

evelrod (Automotive)
13 Dec 04 13:28
Having lived in SoCal for almost 39 years, even I find it difficult to understand the folks back home.
However---after a couple weeks, Ah'm tawkin jess the same.  Reckon it's the hillbilly genetics takin over!

Rod
MadMango (Mechanical)
13 Dec 04 13:49
As they say, "You can take the boy out of the country, but can't take the country out of the boy."

"But what... is it good for?"
Engineer at the Advanced Computing Systems Division of IBM, 1968, commenting on the microchip.
Have you read FAQ731-376 to make the best use of Eng-Tips Forums?

ctopher (Mechanical)
13 Dec 04 14:27
yeeeup
crossframe (Structural)
14 Dec 04 8:35
evelrod,

In SoCal I had a boss from S.C.  We hated it when he went "home" to visit because it was three weeks before we could understand him again!
TerryScan (Civil/Environmental)
14 Dec 04 14:13
I am in Delaware.  I once had a contractor from Alabama who was bidding on a job and called to inquire about cover over the "bale"....What "Bale"?... "the pipe bale"....."the pipe bale?"...."yeah....the bale...at the end of the pipe, where it gets wider"

HgTX (Civil/Environmental)
6 Jan 05 3:25
Millitad--izzat the opposite of the metric buttload?

Hg
flamby (Structural)
8 Jan 05 1:51
cement n. concrete

Ciao.

UcfSE (Structural)
10 Jan 05 22:54
awallago: "A while ago", not to be confused with an island group in the Pacific near South America.

We done designed thet thar beam awallago. Dubya twayllve by twenny-six.  

fixin' ta:  "fixing to"

Weer fixin ta go home n havabeer.  Yankees say, "Fixing to go home? What's broke?  I don't understand."
CajunCenturion (Computer)
11 Jan 05 9:38
UcfSE, when you refer to "Yankees say,", do you mean northern Americans or all Americans?

Good Luck
--------------
As a circle of light increases so does the circumference of darkness around it. - Albert Einstein

CoryPad (Materials)
11 Jan 05 10:58
Yankee obviously is the opposite of Redneck.  Geography is irrelevant these days.  

Regards,

Cory

Please see FAQ731-376 for tips on how to make the best use of Eng-Tips Fora.

ewh (Aerospace)
11 Jan 05 11:02
CoryPad,
I must disagree.  I've known many redneck yankees, and many southern gentlemen (and gentlewomen) who are definitely not rednecks.
DwattedWabbit (Civil/Environmental)
11 Jan 05 12:08
Agree with ewh: The South is not the exclusive home of rednecks.  Rural parts of New England abound with a Yankee version of rednecks who (I'm sure) evolved concurrently with Southern rednecks.  I've lived in Maine, New Hampshire, and Massachusetts, and have known and worked with quite a few rednecks of the Northern variety.  And I've lived in Virginia, where I have also known and worked with members of the Southern variety.  In basic philosophy and outlook on life, there's not much difference between the two.  No aspersions cast here upon personality or abilities: I've found many of both types to be intelligent and savvy, as well as some who are just plain stupid.  No difference there between rednecks and the rest of the population.
SomeYahoo (Military)
12 Jan 05 15:44
One from the welders:

Slippery Hot: So hot that when you pick it up it slips out of your hand.  Typically occurs after it's been welt or had the blue wrench put to it.
UcfSE (Structural)
14 Jan 05 14:47
LOL, being born and raised in Florida I meant northern United States people.  It looks like everyone got it anyway
rmw (Mechanical)
16 Jan 05 23:26
Cajuncenturion,

I was raised in the central portion of the cajun state, and was called a "yankee" by my coona__ friends all my life.

rmw
CajunCenturion (Computer)
17 Jan 05 10:32
That's because you were north of US190, if you're friends are liberal, and I-10 if they're conservative.  

Good Luck
--------------
As a circle of light increases so does the circumference of darkness around it. - Albert Einstein

sprintcar (Mechanical) (OP)
18 Jan 05 8:08
Glad to see ya'll fixin ta keep this hear fourom alive!

We had a secretary who was always 'fixin' to do things... one day I told her I was "..repairing to go to a meeting.."

I responded to her puzzled look with "Repair, fix... all the same. I'm just trying to fit in down here"

She was never 'fixin to' around me again!

Keep the wheels on the ground
Bob
metman (Materials)
20 Jan 05 3:08
Was it the barouque period when they were always repairng to the smoking room or wherever?  Maybe they felt repaired after a little glass of sherry. Sorry for the time warp tangent.

NormPeterson (Structural)
21 Jan 05 7:10

Quote:

originally posted by flamby
cement . . .
That be pronounced see' ment.
DwattedWabbit (Civil/Environmental)
21 Jan 05 8:14
As in Jethro's "CE-ment" pond ("Beverly Hillbillies")?  (I love that show - Jed may be ignorant of high society ways, but he has a keen wisdom that sustains him.)
flamby (Structural)
22 Jan 05 0:41
Just to post 100th post!!!

Ciao.

quark (Mechanical)
22 Jan 05 0:49
hmmm...100th reply. Now I got both the credits.

quark (Mechanical)
22 Jan 05 0:52
huh...it is foolish. Somebody misguided this lazy soul in another thread.

Neighmond (Mechanical)
23 Jan 05 4:41
From a long line of hill billies:
Antigodlin-sort of like catter wampus ("that frame's got antigodlin and it chatters to beat he--!")
wrent-mangled or ripped ("drill bit caught it and wrent that setting all to h---")
(give it) all nine pounds-I am told this referres to a nine-pound hammer. Means hit it hard.
From head to feather-in all of the way, or a ways in("I had a long taper pin and run it in from head to feather.")
Fraction-breakage by trauma("drop that while it's too cold and there'll be fraction")

I have seldom if ever heard those terms outside of the old shop I used to work in.
sprintcar (Mechanical) (OP)
24 Jan 05 9:16
Thanks Neighmond  - when I was in Talladega, the Harley mechanics used "Anigoglin" (local dialect I guess) when it was past "waller'd out" but I never knew there was a real spelling. They told me the best translation to us yankees was "All F***'d up" but they were too polite to use such words.

>>Neighmond (Mechanical) Jan 23, 2005 From a long line of hill billies: Antigodlin-sort of like catter wampus <<

Keep the wheels on the ground
Bob

Helpful Member!  DRWeig (Electrical)
24 Jan 05 17:03
Gee, I didn't read the whole thread but did anybody mention "POOKY?"

It's what we do to the open ends of fiberglass pipe insulation where it terminates, as in, "Pooky up them there ends with some of that there sealant."  Southern sheetrock installers have been known to pooky-up joints in walls too...

Love this!!!

Old Dave
rerig (Aerospace)
26 Jan 05 14:02
It's frightning, but they use the term "Pooky" in aviation as a Verb & a Noun.
The antenna base needs a little pooky.
I need to pooky the panel after installation.

I have tried, in vein, to stop the shop slang.
But I won't let them use it when requesting assistance.
I guess that makes me anal. Too bad.

Now I have to go clean the pooky off of my hands.
metman (Materials)
27 Jan 05 23:49
Maybe if you rerig your methodology , you can keep the pooky off of your hands.

dwedel (Mechanical)
29 Jan 05 21:31
Thanks for the thread.

From Montana,

Gas axe = acetylene torch
Yep = affermative
Hanging prepositions = I'm going to town, you want to go with?
NickelMet (Materials)
2 Feb 05 7:39
Just heard this one over the plant maintenance radio:

"Ahr compressure"

Which I took to mean "air compressor". It wasn't just one instance, it was a whole 5 minute conversation with several people.

Gotta love living in redneck country!

~NiM
sprintcar (Mechanical) (OP)
2 Feb 05 13:17
I just got back from the Alabama plant that makes fixtures. For what you ask?

" To assemble 'Cadillac Converters'. These here fixtures hold sompthin so's they can add the gold, silver, platnum and other stuff. "

I guess if I drove a Cadillac, I'd want gold plated muffler bearings too....

Keep the wheels on the ground
Bob

metman (Materials)
3 Feb 05 0:06
Tahfun--

That is how the receptionist paged people to answer the     _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _  in a Bluefield WV manufacturing facility.

metman (Materials)
2 Mar 05 3:43
And then there was the coal miner who kept referring to something called a "pear-center" when we were underground in Kentucky.  For the life of me I could not figure out what he was talking about.  I was fairly certain there were no pear trees down there or pear processing facilities.

Finally we came near to a pear-center and/or by context it became clear that he meant power-center.

FalsePrecision (Structural)
2 Mar 05 6:52
Mud = cement grout, or concrete, or drywall joint compound, or drilling fluid (as in drilling for oil or geotech core drilling).

Now, does anyone know what they call wet, sloppy dirt? It has to be something other than mud.

Bofems = Both of them

Colyum = column, such as structural steel column

Footer = Footing

Sheer = Shear wall

Hedder = Header (slightly diffrent prunuskiation)
sprintcar (Mechanical) (OP)
2 Mar 05 8:04
..rampant "R" symdrome..
overheard yesterday:

"I got an idear...how's about ya'll foller me over yonder so's I kin carry my truck back?"

On local TV: "I sure hope we don't git no more tornaders around here"

...and don't forget to warsh your hands after you use the terlet....

Keep the wheels on the ground
Bob

FalsePrecision (Structural)
2 Mar 05 8:38
Red awrnn = structural steel
Mrfxit (Industrial)
9 Mar 05 22:34
A Chicago bolt or Chicago screw is a real fastener use in belts and other things like gun rigs. They are shaped with wide flat heads on both the nut and bolt halves so as to keep from pulling out. Some are slotted for a screwdriver. The nut is long enough to allign two or more holes then you tighten the materials together with the bolt. Commonly used to hold the buckle on belts.
Eggbert (Industrial)
11 Mar 05 7:14
Just to shift from Redneck to English phrases, here are a few common ones for the use of 'persuasion devices';

Bray it
Belt it
Smack it
Twat it

All of which mean, of course, if it dunt fitit, itit.

jmw (Industrial)
11 Mar 05 7:57
My nephew, who has had a good education at Auburn, has occassional Redneck fits and said  "....this whole bunch of army guys...."
Now I deduced he meant soldiers,his use of "bunch" as a colective, especially for a military unit, had me going.
Just how many collective nouns are there in Redneck?
I know just two:
"Bunch" as in the above example and "muss" as in: a "whole muss of wares" (a whole mess of wires e.g. when refering to the wiring loom in a car, sorry, pick-up)
I am not sure if a "six-pack" counts as a collective.

JMW
www.ViscoAnalyser.com

sprintcar (Mechanical) (OP)
11 Mar 05 8:24
JMW - From local experience (observed)...
A six-pack qualifies as one of the four major food groups for any meal during the day.

Keep the wheels on the ground
Bob

weh3 (Electrical)
11 Mar 05 10:05
I have been asked to bring down one of those pin-you-matic (or pee-numatic) controllers, i.e., 3-15 psi.

Wm
FalsePrecision (Structural)
11 Mar 05 10:54
Is there a branch of redneck jargon called NASCAR-ese? Does anyone have any examples?
MadMango (Mechanical)
11 Mar 05 15:24
Similar to 'bunch' near the inner cities you might hear the term  'gang', "There's a whole gang o'wires stuffed in there."

"I think there is a world market for maybe five computers."
Thomas Watson, chairman of IBM, 1943.
Have you read FAQ731-376 to make the best use of Eng-Tips Forums?

sprintcar (Mechanical) (OP)
11 Mar 05 15:54
don't forget 'passel' as in
"She's got a whole passel of young'uns running around the double wide"

Racing and bullfighting are the only real sports...everything else is just a game.
Bob

FalsePrecision (Structural)
11 Mar 05 16:02
Idea - let's start a bull racing event. There would be dubblewides strategically located as obstacles on the race course.
HgTX (Civil/Environmental)
11 Mar 05 18:34
jmw--don't forget all the variations on the ****-load theme.

Hg
rerig (Aerospace)
14 Mar 05 9:52
HgTX

I'm guessing a Butt-load comes before a ****-load?

Rerig
Qshake (Structural)
14 Mar 05 11:27
Speaking of the proper sequence of butt-load and $&!^-load, does it bother anyone else why someone would to "take" a crap as opposed to "leaving" a crap?!

Regards,
Qshake

Eng-Tips Forums:Real Solutions for Real Problems Really Quick.

DRWeig (Electrical)
14 Mar 05 14:52
FalsePrecision mentioned NASCAR above, so before it gets out of hand in this thread, please remember:

There are only two sorts of NASCAR fan:

1) Foul mouthed, drunken, shirtless tobacco-juice spitters,

and,

2) Their husbands.

Rjeffery (Civil/Environmental)
14 Mar 05 18:43
Crescent-Hammer = adjustable wrench
Flame-Hammer = Oxy-Acetylene Torch
Stinger = Electrode Holder on an SMAW rig

Na Angledah is someone born in either Maine, New Hampshire, (forgive me mother) Vermont, Mass, Connecticut, or Rhode Island.

The Above are also Yankees and proud to be the ones that were brave enough to eat the first Labstah!
jcfoley (Mechanical)
15 Mar 05 9:00
I picked up this one in the army.

Flaming Wrench = Oxy-Acetylene Torch
Qshake (Structural)
15 Mar 05 10:12
I've also heard "gas-hatchet" for the torch!

Regards,
Qshake

Eng-Tips Forums:Real Solutions for Real Problems Really Quick.

Victoripod (Aerospace)
27 Mar 05 20:07
C-clamp
(micrometer)
NickelMet (Materials)
28 Mar 05 8:01
New one for the day:

unliahned (pronounced like 'un-lined')

refers to MISALIGNMENT!

~NiM
sprintcar (Mechanical) (OP)
14 Jun 05 10:18
"Due to lack of particapation...  "

(from a recent email)

Nobody likes to particap I guess

Southern spelling creates an entire new language


"If A equals success, then the formula is: A = X + Y + Z, X is work. Y is play. Z is keep your mouth shut."
-- by Albert Einstein

Helpful Member!  rmt131 (Electrical)
14 Jun 05 16:02
Hmmm...perhaps a new set of linguistic anomalies?

For those of us north of the 49th, generally the most puzzling dialect to comprehend would be so-called 'Newfie' sayings.  Newfoundlanders have their own, very distinct sayings, and they often compound the problem by talking incredibly fast (as compared to central and western Canada).

Nevertheless, I worked for several years with citizens of Newfoundland, and I found them to be some of the best-natured, fun-loving, and most extremely hospitable people I have ever worked with. If you ever have a chance to, I'd highly recommend a trip to Newfoundland or Labrador!  Just sitting in the local bar and trying to understand conversations going on around you is challenging! (and if they find out you're from "away", it generally gets even more fun, as sometimes the entire bar will participate in testing your knowledge of local saying to date...)

Here's only a few Newfie-ism examples:

"she" or "Her" (pronounced 'er) - generally used to replace the word 'it', as in "How's she goin', eh?" (How are things with you), "Boy, she's gettin' nasty out there" (The weather is getting rough) or "Fiddle wit' 'er until she's right" (Keep adjusting it until it works properly)

"side by each" - beside one another, as in "Just put those there side-by-each, that'll do 'er."

"slippy" - slippery, as in "She's gettin mighty slippy out there, better watch 'er." (watch your footing, it's slippery outside)

"where y' to?" - Where are you right now?

"about" - doing, happening, see "B'ye"

"hold up" - Stop, hold on, desist, see "B'ye"

"B'ye" - 'Boy', general reference for someone else, as in "Hold up there, b'ye, let's see what yer about" (Stop what you're doing, I want to see what you're doing before you do any more)

"stay where yer to, b'ye, I'll come where yer at..." - (Don't move, I'll come over there [for whatever reason])

"Bass-ackwards" (or "arse-frontwise", "arse front") - backwards, all wrong, as in "See b'ye, ye've gone an' wired it all arse-frontwise" (you've wired it backwards)

Other places for some example Newfie-isms, including excerpts from the Newfie-English dictionary:

http://www.io.com/~sjohn/sandra/nfsay.htm

http://www.joe-ks.com/archives_nov2003/Newfie_English.htm


Enjoy!
rmt131
sprintcar (Mechanical) (OP)
17 Jun 05 8:49
Apostrofacized

to add an apostrophe  "He get's it done"

"If A equals success, then the formula is: A = X + Y + Z, X is work. Y is play. Z is keep your mouth shut."
-- by Albert Einstein

NickelMet (Materials)
20 Jun 05 7:51
New one this morning, on the way into the plant, overheard a receiving clerk tell a truck driver:

Truck Driver:  "Where'd ya want dis load?"
Clerk:  "Dumpitdare"  (say it really fast with an arm wave and emphatic finger pointing)

Translation:  "Where do you need me to set this load down?"  "Put it over in the area marked B-2.  (DUMP-IT-THERE"


~NiM
sprintcar (Mechanical) (OP)
20 Jun 05 9:45
Email from our plant nurse:

"Don't forget, the meeting to meet the instructor for smoking cesession is tomorrow June 21st at 10:00 am.  Please come and meet him."

I wonder what she is smoking.....

"If A equals success, then the formula is: A = X + Y + Z, X is work. Y is play. Z is keep your mouth shut."
-- by Albert Einstein

sprintcar (Mechanical) (OP)
18 Oct 05 9:55
and they continue to amuse here:

You must be REGISTRATED by Friday October 21

"If A equals success, then the formula is: A = X + Y + Z, X is work. Y is play. Z is keep your mouth shut."
-- by Albert Einstein

SomeYahoo (Military)
18 Oct 05 9:57
...from the same folks that brought you "instrumentated".
sprintcar (Mechanical) (OP)
18 Oct 05 10:18
yup - they are all "Edumacated" at fine collages and universals

"If A equals success, then the formula is: A = X + Y + Z, X is work. Y is play. Z is keep your mouth shut."
-- by Albert Einstein

MadMango (Mechanical)
18 Oct 05 12:35
I've heard it again...

Playing Tech Support this morning over the phone with a service technician in Arkansas, "Are you sure the 10a fuse didn't blow after replacing the controller?"

Tech says, "Done been had that."

This is a term that means, "I have already tried/checked that."  I can never seem to find the opprotune time to use that phrase.

"I think there is a world market for maybe five computers."
Thomas Watson, chairman of IBM, 1943.
Have you read FAQ731-376 to make the best use of Eng-Tips Forums?

crossframe (Structural)
18 Oct 05 12:36
One that I am trying to get into common usage in my office:

OUTVERT:  The elevation of the inside of the downhill end of a pipe or culvert, where the water flows out.  Often used with INVERT.


jraef (Electrical)
18 Oct 05 19:22
Ok, OK, I've now soiled myself, got ta go git me sumpen ta git cleaned up wif!

My employer is based in Florida, I am in California.  Because of the time difference, I take tech support calls once the Florida operation goes home. This entire thread describes my daily work life.

Sorta = absolutely

Kinda = almost

Kindasorta = I think so, can't remember

There 'bouts = close, but not sure

'bout chyahr = closer still

That'll do = meets specifications

Jes fahn = exceeds specifications, but I will not give you the satisfaction of knowing that.

Yessur = yes

Yessur = I understand the question, but I have no idea and I don't want you to know it

Nosur = I had no idea what you were even asking me.

Wahr = wire

Kaybull = cable (often, the 'u' is silent, especially in Texas)

Heet sank = heat sink (I have seen it spelled this way in several emails and faxes)

Huckedy-puck = Hockey Puck (a euphamism for ceramic style SCR electrical device)

Frahd = fried, as in the magic smoke came out

Uppun dahd awn me = It was working, but quit when I shoved that scewdriver into it.

Kaint = can't, or won't, no difference.

The worst thang ees?, afta 'bout 'n hour er 2 wif 'em on th' phone?, I starts ta talken lahk 'em too, and sumuvem gets ta thanken its down raht insulten. Kaint hep muself tho.

Eng-Tips: Help for your job, not for your homework  Read FAQ731-376

HgTX (Civil/Environmental)
19 Oct 05 11:11
"Kaybull = cable (often, the 'u' is silent, especially in Texas)"

How else is one to pronounce "cable"?  (And before you get after the "TX" in "HgTX", I learned to talk north of the Mason-Dixon line and east of the Mississippi.)


From at least one of my inspectors:
Correct = I didn't know that.

Hg

Eng-Tips policies:  FAQ731-376

rmw (Mechanical)
19 Oct 05 12:36
MadMango,

Southern-ese 'verbal short hand' (otherwise known as Red Neck Engineering Terminology) for "done been there, already had that fun."

Completely understandable, and usable in normal deep south technical conversation, but you have to have been there to understand it.

rmw

jraef (Electrical)
19 Oct 05 21:42
HgTX,
I couldn't adequately translate the phonics of how Texans say cable. I used to deal a lot with an outfit named Houston Wire and Cable, and whenever any of them said the name of their company I would crack up. Houston was pronounced something like "HEws'n", Wire was in a drawl, like "whohr", and the Cable came out with a heavy accent on the "kAIy", with a truncated "bl".  Still makes me chuckle. I bought so mych whohr from them on an emergency project once that they sent me a pair of Tony Loma's and a Stetson XXX Beaver (that's a hat for y'all who don't know). That's still my fall back Halloween costume, but here in the SF Bay Area, you have to be carefull about wearing that, it can attract the wrong kind of attention.
rmw (Mechanical)
19 Oct 05 22:06
jraef,

Your last sentence is open to all kinds of ambiguities.

rmw
crossframe (Structural)
20 Oct 05 8:03
rmw,

Not to someone who's LIVED in San Francisco!


blackwed (Electrical)
20 Oct 05 8:19
A couple things crack me up.  

First, my son and I were talking with some friends one time and someone used the term "you guys."  "Hey," said Son, "you're in South Carolina.  The term is y'all."  

The other is New Englanders' inability to pronounce "er" unless it isn't in the word.  The guy on the woodworking show says he's going to install the "draws" as shown on the "drawering."  Fortunately, even though I watch him several times a week, it ain't rubbed off on me yet.

BTW, Son's in grad school in MA.  If you ever run into someone giving out y'all's like they grow on trees, that'd be him.

DB

deja moo:  I've heard that BS before.

zeusfaber (Military)
20 Oct 05 8:21
"Antishipwise"
-When submarines are built by stacking hull rings one on top of the next, prior to being turned "shipwise" (so the boat is pointing forward, not up.

A.
HgTX (Civil/Environmental)
20 Oct 05 20:37
"Cable came out with a heavy accent on the 'kAIy', with a truncated 'bl'."

I still can't think of any other way to say it.

Oh well.

Hg

Eng-Tips policies:  FAQ731-376

sprintcar (Mechanical) (OP)
21 Oct 05 12:05
crossframe reminded me of this - note the date

System Pipe Specifications

With reference to B31.3, new specifications for system pipe have been adopted by the Warranty Department on 1 Apr 04.  If the customer's pipe does not meet the following specifications, it may interfere with system operation or move the operating conditions away from those specified on the initial bid. In this case, the Warranty may be considered void and any failure will be the responsibility of the Customer.

1.    All pipe shall be made of a long hole, encased by metal or plastic material concentric with the hole.
2.    All pipe shall be hollow throughout the entire length.
3.    Do not use holes of different length than the pipe.
4.    All pipe is to be of the very best quality, perfectly tubular or pipular.
5.    All acid proof pipe is to be made of acid proof metal.
6.    The I.D. (inside diameter) of all pipe must not exceed the O.D. (outside diameter) or the hole may be on the outside of the pipe.
7.    All pipe is to be supplied with nothing in the hole so that water, slurry or other process material can be put inside at a later date.
8.    All pipe should be supplied without rust. This shall be applied at the job site by the Contractor, Fitter or Customer.  Note: Some Vendors are now able to supply pre-rusted pipe. If available, this product will save a lot of time on the job site.
9.    All pipe is to be cleaned free of any covering such as mud, tar, barnacles, or any form of manure before putting up, otherwise it will make lumps under the paint.
10.    All pipe over 500ft (153m) in length should have the words "long pipe" clearly painted on each end, so the Contractor will know it is a long pipe.
11.    Pipe over 2 miles (3.2km) in length must have the words "long pipe" painted in the middle, so the Contractor will not have to walk the entire length of the pipe to determine if it is a long pipe.
12.    All pipe over 6" (152mm) in diameter shall have the words "large pipe" painted on it, so the Fitter will not mistake it for small pipe.
13.    All pipe closers are to be open on one end.
14.    All pipe fittings shall be made of the same stuff as the pipe.
15.    No fittings are to be put on the pipe unless specified. Otherwise straight pipe will be crooked pipe.
16.    When ordering 90 degree, 45 degree or other elbows, be sure to specify right hand or left hand or the pipe will end up going the wrong way.
17.    Be sure to specify horizontal, vertical, uphill or downhill sloping pipe. If downhill pipe is used for going uphill, the water will flow in the wrong direction.
18.    Fittings come bolted, welded, or screwed. Always use screwed. They are the best.
19.    All threaded pipe couplings should have either right hand or left hand thread. Do not mix the threads or as the coupling is being screwed on one pipe, it is unscrewed from the other.
20.    Flanges must be used on all non-threaded pipe connections.
21.    Flanges must have bolt holes external to and separate from the big hole in the middle.
22.    Fasteners are required to hold flanges together.
23.    If flanges are to be blank or blind, the big hole in the middle must be filled with metal.
24.    All metal flanges must be cast or forged of the very best quality iron metal, close grained, free from blow holes, lumps, cavities, pock marks, pin pricks, and warts, otherwise we can't use them.
25.    Gaskets shall be used to fill in the space between flanges
26.    Gaskets are to be made of metal, rubber, plastic, paper, or some kind of goop. Do not use cow or sheep manure, it cracks when it gets dry.
27.    All bolts are to be screwed.
28.    All bolts must have a head on one end and a nut on the other.
29.    Bolts without heads are to be furnished as studs.
30.    Studs without heads are to be screwed all over and have two nuts, which is standard.
31.    Studs with three nuts shall not be used since they would be odd.
32.    All nuts are to be furnished in sacks. Sacks must be whole and sound, with a minimum of two nuts per sack. Paper sacks will not be tolerated.
33.    All piping shall be installed with valves.
34.    All valves must have an opening on each end with a flapper in the middle which goes up and down or sideways when you turn the wheel or crank so that it will open or close. Otherwise the stuff in the pipe will run out of the ends.
35.    Valves are to be furnished by the kind required as follows:
* Ball valves shall have a ball inside.
* Gate valves shall have a gate inside.
* Globe valves shall have a globe inside.
* Check valves shall have a check inside. Czech's shall be in the Czech Republic.
* Angle valves shall have an angle inside.
* Plug valves shall have a plug inside.
* Diaphragm valves shall have a diaphragm inside.
36.    Ball valves are not to be used anywhere with a female connection.
37.    Diaphragm valves shall only be used with a female connection.
38.    All completed pipe lines must go somewhere and connect to something. The Fitter and Contractor shall verify this prior to turnover.
39.    Specify that the correct specifications are specified on all specific pipe specification documents.

"If A equals success, then the formula is: A = X + Y + Z, X is work. Y is play. Z is keep your mouth shut."
-- by Albert Einstein

kchayfie (Chemical)
2 Nov 05 7:08
Northern England rather than Southern US:

Bi reet - it will be alright
seaduck (Mechanical)
4 Nov 05 8:59
Quote
"Give a man a hammer and the whole world becomes his nail" Dennis Mori 2005
sprintcar (Mechanical) (OP)
7 Nov 05 9:05
Give a man a fish and you feed him for a day..
Teach him to surf the web and he'll leave you alone for months...

"If A equals success, then the formula is: A = X + Y + Z, X is work. Y is play. Z is keep your mouth shut."
-- by Albert Einstein

hawkeyes (Mechanical)
11 Nov 05 17:49
Give a man a match and he'll be warm for a minute.
Set him on fire and he'll be warm for the rest of his life.
bacon4life (Electrical)
14 Nov 05 20:24
So is ca·ble (k?'b?l) pronounced like produced by the speaker icon half way down this page?
http://www.answers.com/cable&r=67
JPatten (Civil/Environmental)
15 Nov 05 8:04
OVER YONDER: Not North, South, East, or West.  Which ever direction the finger is pointing.

kidCivil (Civil/Environmental)
17 Nov 05 19:07
hehhe - got a few from Australia!

Not so much redneck words but site slang:

OUT OF WHACK = misaligned
DONGER = site shed
POP IT = drill it
SMOKO = morning tea
CHIPPY = carpenter
SPARKY = electrician
STEELIE = steelfixer
SCAFFY = scaffolder
BRICKIE = bricklayer
DOGGIE = dogman/ crane chaser
ZAPPY = welder/ boilermaker
SLUMPY = concreter
SLOPPY = painter
NIPPER = site shed cleaner
ENGO or ENGY (pronounced en-joe or en-jee) = engineer
TREE-HUGGER = environmental engineer or any other environmental profession
ACCO = accident
TRUCKWITS (as in f***wits) = arrogant/ dangerous truck drivers
ALIMAK (brand) = builders hoist

enjoy


sprintcar (Mechanical) (OP)
23 Nov 05 8:32
at a local restaurant:

"I'm fixin' to fix all ya'll's tea"

"If A equals success, then the formula is: A = X + Y + Z, X is work. Y is play. Z is keep your mouth shut."
-- by Albert Einstein

GPHill (Mechanical)
2 Dec 05 14:47
When something is "FIXIN' TO BREAK" It's almost to the point of failure
rasor1514 (Electrical)
2 Dec 05 15:14
How about: jeet?

Means: did you eat?

And the reply could be: yawnto?

Means: do you want to?
yoyo133 (Mechanical)
5 Dec 05 0:30
from the northern neck of Virginia

1. intoit - past tense of installing one object in another (refering to a replacement engine in the pickup.."I put a motor intoit"
2. cork - caulk .. as in wooden boats. "Ah corked the hull"
blackwed (Electrical)
5 Dec 05 11:16
Sprintcar, your server was clearly waiting a table with multiple diners as is indicated by the use of the plural, "all y'all."  The singular, of course, being simply "y'all."

DB

deja moo:  I've heard that BS before.

HgTX (Civil/Environmental)
5 Dec 05 14:37
In my experience, it's mostly people who don't know how to use "y'all" in the first place who make that comment about "all y'all" being the plural of "y'all".  

I don't get the big deal.  It's the same as the difference between "you people" and "all of you".  Both are plural.  One is exhaustive in its reference, the other is not.  Wow, that sure gives me giggle fits.

Hg

Eng-Tips policies:  FAQ731-376

blackwed (Electrical)
5 Dec 05 15:58
Would it have come out any better if I'd a' stuck a big ol' South Carolina smiley face at the end of my last post?

DB

deja moo:  I've heard that BS before.

analogkid2digitalman (Electrical)
5 Dec 05 16:28
What are yous talking about?

Wheels within wheels / In a spiral array
A pattern so grand / And complex
Time after time / We lose sight of the way
Our causes can't see / Their effects.

sprintcar (Mechanical) (OP)
7 Dec 05 11:59
Yous guys....
Thanks for the interpretation blackwed


New one for the main topic.... Fellow just moved here and the real estate agent told his wife:
"It won't take you long to get antiquated with the area"

"If A equals success, then the formula is: A = X + Y + Z, X is work. Y is play. Z is keep your mouth shut."
-- by Albert Einstein

JPatten (Civil/Environmental)
12 Dec 05 9:34
North of the Mason Dixon Line:  You guys

South of the Mason Dixon Line:  Y'all

Pittsburgh Area:  Y'inz
HgTX (Civil/Environmental)
12 Dec 05 10:54
New Jersey and Staten Island, age 50 and up:  youse guys

Eng-Tips policies:  FAQ731-376

ACtrafficengr (Civil/Environmental)
13 Dec 05 9:04
The law of conservation of consonants: For every cah pahked in Hahvahd,Mass, there a four worshed in Hewsn, Tehxus.

------------------------------------------
     "...students of traffic are beginning to realize the false economy of mechanically controlled traffic, and hand work by trained officers will again prevail."

              Wm. Phelps Eno, ca. 1928

HgTX (Civil/Environmental)
13 Dec 05 11:15
I've heard "warshed" only in Pennsylvania, not Houston.  

The Texasism that has knocked me for the biggest loop so far is "oil" pronounced to rhyme with "hole".  Even weirder when it's "oily" pronounced to rhyme with "holy".  Somehow I just wasn't expecting it.

Weird thing about the conservation of R is that it's often "conserved" within the dialect.  So pahking the cah in the illegal arear is a wicked bad idear.  (There's actually a perfectly normal and unfunny linguistic explanation for this pattern but I'll spare y'all.)

Hg


Eng-Tips policies:  FAQ731-376

JAE (Structural)
13 Dec 05 16:12
When I first moved to San Antonio, Texas, I stepped across the street to meet my new neighbor.  She visited with me for a while and her accent was quite pronounced.  I asked her where her husband was and she said,

"He's out hunting fer air heads".

It took me about a week to figure out she was trying to say "arrow heads".
JAE (Structural)
15 Dec 05 10:58
COMPUTER TERMS - TEXAS TRANSLATION:

LOG ON: Making a wood stove hotter.
LOG OFF: Don't add no more wood.
MONITOR: Keeping an eye on the wood stove.
DOWNLOAD: Gettin' the farwood off the truck
MEGA HERTZ: When yer not keerful gettin' the farwood
FLOPPY DISC: Whatcha git from tryin to carry too much farwood
RAM: That thing tha splits the farwood
HARD DRIVE: Gettin' home in the winter time
PROMPT: What the mail ain't in the winter time
WINDOWS: What to shut when it's cold outside
SCREEN: What to shut when it's black fly season
BYTE: What them dang flies do
CHIP: Munchies fer the TV
MICRO CHIP: What's in the bottom of the munchie bag
MODEM: Whatcha did to the hay fields
DOT MATRIX: Old Dan Matrix's wife
LAP TOP: Where the kitty sleeps
KEYBOARD: Where ya hang the dang truck keys
SOFTWARE: Them dang plastic forks and knives
MOUSE: What eats the grain in the barn
MOUSE PAD: That's hippie talk fer the mouse hole
MAIN FRAME: Holds up the barn roof
ENTER: Northerner talk fer "c'mon in, y'all"
RANDOM ACCESS MEMORY: When ya can't 'member what ya paid fer the rifle
zeusfaber (Military)
15 Dec 05 14:46
Xenos (Greek):  Stranger; Enemy; Guest (see also Texan:  Tourist).

A.
ScottyUK (Electrical)
17 Dec 05 3:56
I'll post this safe in the knowledge that Pat will have to delete it. But hopefully he'll have a laugh first...

http://www.jardmail.co.uk/attachments/windaz2000.gif

----------------------------------
  Start each day with a smile. Get it over with.

GregLocock (Automotive)
17 Dec 05 6:46
Hey scotty, wrong forum but very funny. Reet lad.

Cheers

Greg Locock

Please see FAQ731-376 for tips on how to make the best use of Eng-Tips.

sprintcar (Mechanical) (OP)
2 Feb 06 7:10
This was in an email to the CEO from the person in charge of the entire manufacturing operation - he was busy bashing Engineering trying to make a case for dual (in/mm) drawings:

I read in the paper Sunday that a conversion error caused the crash of a Nasser Space craft last year so it is not just machinists who make mistakes.

Nasser?? Maybe that's what it will be called when NASCAR starts racing in outer space....

"If A equals success, then the formula is: A = X + Y + Z, X is work. Y is play. Z is keep your mouth shut."
-- by Albert Einstein

jraef (Electrical)
2 Feb 06 22:32
Maybe Egypt got farther along with Soviet technology than we thought...

http://www.time.com/time/covers/0,16641,1101550926,00.html

PS: Am I the only one who caught that? Does it show my age?

Eng-Tips: Help for your job, not for your homework  Read FAQ731-376

NormPeterson (Structural)
3 Feb 06 6:49
You're not alone, jraef.  Though my first quick glance at sprintcar's post picked up "Nasser" and "NASCAR" on the same line - and prompted a vision of a G.A.N. Memorial race 'round the pyramids.

Norm
sprintcar (Mechanical) (OP)
3 Feb 06 10:20

Great Idea!  They could convert the sloped sides of the pyramids into grandstand seating, use the Sphynx for victory lane, probably not have to worry about rain... and race in the sand just like the original Daytona 500!

"If A equals success, then the formula is: A = X + Y + Z, X is work. Y is play. Z is keep your mouth shut."
-- by Albert Einstein

jraef (Electrical)
3 Feb 06 13:59
Come to think of it, wouldn't a pyramid be the ideal grandstand for a circuit race? Elevators and concessions in the middle, seating on the outside with everyone getting a clear view of a big portion of the track. The premium seats wuld be at the top where you could walk around and follow the whole circuit. Maybe even the topmost box on a rotating platform tracking the lead car!

Eng-Tips: Help for your job, not for your homework  Read FAQ731-376

ScottyUK (Electrical)
4 Feb 06 3:40
jraef,

You and sprintcar must have been at the wacky baccy...

but don't you think the Mayan pyramids with their stepped sides are a much better design for a grandstand? Those sloping Egyptian ones could lead to all kinds of lawsuits when people slip off! You could have a South American jungle race at Chichen Itza!

----------------------------------
  I don't suffer from insanity. I enjoy it...

sprintcar (Mechanical) (OP)
6 Feb 06 7:47
Back on headline topic briefly.... the day job continues to provide new words.
Last week one of the newly hired engineers told me he was doing some

Measurementation

ScottyUK - a Jungle race??  That would really get the tree-huggers up in arms if someone proposed clearing the forest for a race.
Besides - how would all the redneck fans get there??

"If A equals success, then the formula is: A = X + Y + Z, X is work. Y is play. Z is keep your mouth shut."
-- by Albert Einstein

sprintcar (Mechanical) (OP)
7 Apr 06 15:32
... and they were living on the only inhibited island in the area..."

I guess they had to wear bathing suits?

"If A equals success, then the formula is: A = X + Y + Z, X is work. Y is play. Z is keep your mouth shut."
-- by Albert Einstein

electricpete (Electrical)
7 Apr 06 17:31
True story - one of my first visits outside of Yankeeland going househunting in preparation for my move to a rural town in Texas.  I stopped at a convenience store and asked directions.

The lady behind the counter pointed and said: "Go the the lot and turn left."

Alertly, I said: "What?"

She repeated louder this time: "GO TO THE LOT AND TURN LEFT!"

Politely I asked: "Excuse me, can you repeat that just one more time?"

Impatiently she replied: "JUST GO'ON OUT TO THE LOT AND TURN LEFT!!"

Sheepishly I asked: "So... is there a parking lot of there or something?

Her reponse: "No, a TRAFFIC lot."

It was then that I knew I was in for loads of fun in this strange place that I now call home.

=====================================
Eng-tips forums: The best place on the web for engineering discussions.

MikeHalloran (Mechanical)
7 Apr 06 19:26
True story:

Very recently, I sought directions from a native of _far_ "upstate New York".  Furriners would describe the area as 'rural'.

His reply began, emphasis added, "Turn left _before_ the building that _used_to_be_called_ ..."

Mike Halloran
Pembroke Pines, FL, USA

sprintcar (Mechanical) (OP)
10 Apr 06 10:43
A few years back I was riding in the rural... VERY rural... southeast and stopped for gas at a small station. It was the holiday season (For those of you not familiar with the deep south, it's also known as the Bible Belt) and there was a nativity scene set up in the parking lot. However, there was a fireman's hat on the head of each of the 3 Wise Men.
When I commented about this to the cashier, this elderly lady informed me that I should spend more time reading the bible. She pulled out her bible and showed me right where it said that
"three wise men came from a far...."

(For those not fluent in southern, "far" = fire)

"If A equals success, then the formula is: A = X + Y + Z, X is work. Y is play. Z is keep your mouth shut."
-- by Albert Einstein

PeteWA (Mining)
13 Apr 06 10:04
I've only ever seen this once, so it isn't common usage, and the only connection to engineering is that the vehicle in question was previously the site managers, but it was advertised for sale as being in "excellent condition and professionally immaculated"
Pete
waross (Electrical)
13 Apr 06 10:41
The only place to go from there is "Conceptionally immaculated"
yours
berkshire (Aeronautics)
18 Apr 06 13:55
Sprint cars analogy,
Reminds me of one of the guys in my shop when I ran a business outside of Atlanta Ga.
  He came in late one morning apologising because he and his wife had stayed up late doing "fixins" for a barbeque they were having after work. Then he says "fixin them taters las night gev me a heyud ache. I gotta find me some peels." So I asked him why he had come to the shop looking for peelings, that he must have had enough of those with the potatoes. No he says "Peels fur m heyud ache. the kind ya swaller."
B.E.   
jraef (Electrical)
19 Apr 06 15:27
At the risk of this turning into a "south bashing" session, I have my own true story.

6 engineers in a car (me driving) on our way to a conference in Alabama north of Huntsville (pronounced Huntsvull BTW). Get to an intersection in a small town and the map shows our route going straight, which we can see becoming a 2 lane residential street. A big green sign on the right side however says our route number and destination as being a right turn, and we can see that main road going east (instead of north) for as far as visible. We take the map route anyway thinking that the sign was attempting to route us through a gauntlet of fast food restaurants or something.  

The road however quickly gets down to one lane and large dirt patches, so we decide maybe the sign is right. We go back and travel that way for 10 miles, but that road is now down to one lane as well, without any further reference to our route number, destination etc.

After a voice vote, we decide to swallow our manly essence and ask directions, so we go back to the intersection because there was a gas station there. We tell the attendant our destination and he confirms that the map was correct, it's down that little dinky road "a spell". I point out to the guy that there is a sign across the street saying the route goes to the right. He says (as phonetically as I can get it);
"Yessir, thaits raht, but don' pay no nevermahnd t' them there sahns, theys wrong!"

Eng-Tips: Help for your job, not for your homework  Read FAQ731-376

pols624 (Electrical)
19 Apr 06 18:11
I work with a gentleman that pronounces the wire size "4/0" as four naught, instead of four aught.

Where I come from eether one is correct, or is it ither.
(either)
sprintcar (Mechanical) (OP)
20 Apr 06 7:36
jraef - At least you didn't get the usual southern directions:
"Ya'll drive down yonder fer a few miles then turn left right where Smitty's gas station used to was..."

"If A equals success, then the formula is: A = X + Y + Z, X is work. Y is play. Z is keep your mouth shut."
-- by Albert Einstein

yanceman (Mechanical)
20 Apr 06 15:53
From Cleveland, Ohio area:

Unobtainium: Material that is so costly, you cain't find it.

FUBAR: F**ked Up Beyond All Repair (ARMY, Ft. Hood Tx)

Taar's: Them round rubber things on yer wheel rims.

And yes, there be rednecks this far north.

Yanceman

Helpful Member!  Ashereng (Petroleum)
20 Apr 06 16:20
I worked with an engineers from Alabama (pronounced alaBAMa)and Georgia (pronounced Jooor-gia I think)

They sounded every bit like I did, except for the pronounciation of place names ... and Allen-Bradley. They pronounced it Ailin' Badly.

Apologies to AB employees. blush

"Do not worry about your problems with mathematics, I assure you mine are far greater."   
Albert Einstein
Have you read FAQ731-376 to make the best use of Eng-Tips Forums?

UcfSE (Structural)
20 Apr 06 16:37
"Ailin Badly" looks more like a joke as a deliberate mispronunciation than a southern thang.
Ashereng (Petroleum)
20 Apr 06 17:15
rofl

Yes it is. But you have got to hear them say it.

I say it, and people get offended. They say it, and it's an souther accent thing.

"Do not worry about your problems with mathematics, I assure you mine are far greater."   
Albert Einstein
Have you read FAQ731-376 to make the best use of Eng-Tips Forums?

berkshire (Aeronautics)
21 Apr 06 4:26
Ashereng (Petroleum)
I think the local pronuciation of Georgia is Jaw-Ja
with the J pronounced hard as in Jaw breaker.
B.E.
Ashereng (Petroleum)
21 Apr 06 12:43
bershire, could be. I'm never one to correct how another pronounce where they come from.

"Do not worry about your problems with mathematics, I assure you mine are far greater."   
Albert Einstein
Have you read FAQ731-376 to make the best use of Eng-Tips Forums?

sprintcar (Mechanical) (OP)
21 Apr 06 14:13
Careful folks.... in Georgia He just needed killin' is a legal defense in court

"If A equals success, then the formula is: A = X + Y + Z, X is work. Y is play. Z is keep your mouth shut."
-- by Albert Einstein

Ashereng (Petroleum)
21 Apr 06 14:16
I have heard that in Texas, you don't even need a defense if he/she/it was on your property. cannon

"Do not worry about your problems with mathematics, I assure you mine are far greater."   
Albert Einstein
Have you read FAQ731-376 to make the best use of Eng-Tips Forums?

danw2 (Industrial)
25 Apr 06 22:01
maul nar

The SAE technical term for rate of ground speed, enjoys  wide spread use in the general population, as in,

Ah musta bin doin' bout 100 maul nar when dat tar blew out.

Dan
sprintcar (Mechanical) (OP)
27 Apr 06 9:39
Just a reminder..
When you visit a Zoo in the north, in front of each enclosure is a sign containing the name of the animal, its scientific name, habitat and a description.
When you visit a Zoo in the south, the sign in front of the cage also includes a recipe......

"If A equals success, then the formula is: A = X + Y + Z, X is work. Y is play. Z is keep your mouth shut."
-- by Albert Einstein

Ashereng (Petroleum)
27 Apr 06 10:38
sprintcar,

That is hilarious.

"Do not worry about your problems with mathematics, I assure you mine are far greater."   
Albert Einstein
Have you read FAQ731-376 to make the best use of Eng-Tips Forums?

HgTX (Civil/Environmental)
8 May 06 11:59
In the "life imitates bad joke" department, I passed Bob Wire Road the other day.

Hg

Eng-Tips policies:  FAQ731-376

SomptingGuy (Automotive)
8 May 06 17:18

Quote:

When you visit a Zoo in the north, in front of each enclosure is a sign containing the name of the animal, its scientific name, habitat and a description.
When you visit a Zoo in the south, the sign in front of the cage also includes a recipe......

Several years ago I took my (now) wife to one of those wildlife places (in Illinois) where they take in and look after birds with broken beaks, rats with sore feet, etc.  There was an excellent booklet describing what to do if you hit a deer with your car.

We were expecting to read about road-side care, mouth-mouth, vets, fosterring of young, that sort of thing.  But the whole leaflet was devoted to the legalities of who owns the body (if other vehicles were involved), where to take it to be butchered and whether or not you could sell the meat.

Amazing, such a different world!
ctopher (Mechanical)
8 May 06 17:53
Samething here in So Cal. You hit someone ... the lawers, insurance companies, hospitals and families fight over who gets the body parts, and for how much!

Chris
Systems Analyst, I.S.
SolidWorks Pro 06/PDMWorks 06
AutoCAD 06
ctopher's home site (updated 06-21-05)
FAQ559-1100
FAQ559-716

sprintcar (Mechanical) (OP)
17 May 06 8:38
This was on the cover of the final draft for a sales brochure and repeated inside in great big letters:

metalergical

Someone must have been "huecked on foniks"

(for those outside the USA - "Hooked on Phonics" is an educational spelling and speech program for young children heavily advertised on TV)

"If A equals success, then the formula is: A = X + Y + Z, X is work. Y is play. Z is keep your mouth shut."
-- by Albert Einstein

jmw (Industrial)
17 May 06 11:12
That says it all.... "heavily advertised on TV".
In the UK "phonics" as a teaching method, was pretty much discredited, so I had thought, so I was surprised, on the plane back from the US a couple of years back to be sat next to some guy grumbling about not being able to upgrade (so he had to sit next to me). He relaxed a bit and said he was coming to the UK to do some TV selling of his "Phonics" "educational" toy.... I don't think he apreciated me telling him my impressions (which have to be easily as mis-informed as most of the population here so right or wrong, I felt he needed to up his market research).

Anyway, he unbent enough to invite my wife and I along to the QVC studio in London and out for a meal afterwards.
I guess, on reflection, that his marketing was probably fine... TV sales must be the ultimate for impulse buying... switch of brain, hit the mute button and reach for the phone and credit card... I'd guess he did OK.

JMW
www.ViscoAnalyser.com

Ashereng (Petroleum)
17 May 06 11:22
Phonics is a tool, like memorization, and others, in learning how to deal with english.

Phonics by it self is insufficient.

When I see a new word, I try to pronounce it phonetically.

Whe I try to spell a new word, I also do it phonetically.

It's a tool.

"Do not worry about your problems with mathematics, I assure you mine are far greater."   
Albert Einstein
Have you read FAQ731-376 to make the best use of Eng-Tips Forums?

3lilaggies (Mechanical)
17 May 06 16:55
Jackamo-refers to another person, possibly another engineer when he does something retarded.
rerig (Aerospace)
18 May 06 8:29
HGTX,

Someone miss-spelled the name of the street.
It is "Bob Wor"
Never heard a Redneck pronounce the word "Wire" correctly.
Actually, I don't think you can spell the pronunciation of the word...it is a cross between "War" and "Were".
Anyhow, enough about Bob Wor.

By the way...for those of you not in the know.
"Bob Wor Fence" - to keep in/out the Cattle.

Rerig (Dallas-Ft. Worth)
sprintcar (Mechanical) (OP)
18 May 06 9:58
It just gets better every day. Today's message from Security:
ADT is working on the Fire Alarm system today, and it will be in test mode all day.

If you see a fire, please call 911,  as the ADT system will not work.


This is the same company where I had to point out that there were no fire extingushers anywhere near the kitchen and the closest one was behind 2 separate locked doors in the lab.

Call 911??  Maybe from my cell phone as I'm heading home!

"If A equals success, then the formula is: A = X + Y + Z, X is work. Y is play. Z is keep your mouth shut."
-- by Albert Einstein

waross (Electrical)
18 May 06 11:57
Years ago, at a technical school, someone in authority noticed that the school had no fire alarm system. A notice was composed.

Quote:

In the event of a fire, please notify other occupants by saying "Fire" in a loud voice, several times. Then proceed to the office and request that a call be made to the fire department.
A copy of the notice was posted at every location that was required by code to have a fire alarm pull station.
yours
pmover (Mechanical)
19 May 06 15:00
while working in albuquerque at a warehouse, i took a telephone call from a fellow in west texas.  the native west texan had an accent difficult for me to understand.  he needed a particular tool and upon confirming possession of tool, i requested the business name and shipping address.  so far so good until he mention the city name.
what city? - "dam it, texas"
sorry you feel that way about texas, but what city? - "no, dam it, texas."
after a few times of hearing this, i was confused and asked the fellow to spell the city name:
"D i m m i t t", Texas.

enjoyed the postings here!
-pmover
ewh (Aerospace)
20 May 06 12:43
Cities in TX aren't always pronounced as it seems they should be.  "Jourdanton" for example is "Jerdenten".
rerig (Aerospace)
22 May 06 8:29
Two gents were traveling from Dallas to Houston.
The were passing through the small town of MEXIA.
They stopped in a fast food restraint for lunch and asked the lady behind the counter how she would pronounce the name of this place. "And please say it slowly" they asked. (Knowing Mexican names sometimes aren't pronounced as the spelling would suggest)
Very slowly and with purpose, she said "BERR GERR KING".

P.S. The town name is pronounced "MU 'HAY UH" (go figure)
P.P.S. I once asked a phone Operator for the name of a company in El Conejo. I knew it was not pronounced as I was about to ask, but with no "tilde" over the "N" I wasn't sure.
I'll bet she is still laughing about the redneck that asked for El Cone-E-Jo.

Rerig (Engineer - not a linguist, not a redneck - don't own a Pickup Truck)
THEReifleman (Mechanical)
22 May 06 11:29
That is an old joke in Texas but I believe it is a Dairy Queen rather than a Burger King.  Unless Mexia has grown enough to merit a Burger King.  Most villages in Texas get a Dairy Queen before they even rate a post office.  Need somewhere to go on Friday nights, I guess.
winky smile
Ashereng (Petroleum)
23 May 06 11:03
I'd vote for Dairy Queen before Burger King too! Soft ice cream and a grill. Hard to beat.

"Do not worry about your problems with mathematics, I assure you mine are far greater."   
Albert Einstein
Have you read FAQ731-376 to make the best use of Eng-Tips Forums?

sprintcar (Mechanical) (OP)
23 May 06 13:13
After 220 posts, I think it's time to grab a burger and a DQ, and move to Redneck Engineering Technology 2, since it takes a LONG time for this big file to open.

Ya'll come by now, ya hear?

"If A equals success, then the formula is: A = X + Y + Z, X is work. Y is play. Z is keep your mouth shut."
-- by Albert Einstein

HgTX (Civil/Environmental)
23 May 06 18:34
Here's a link to Part 2:
thread1010-155528

Reply To This Thread

Posting in the Eng-Tips forums is a member-only feature.

Click Here to join Eng-Tips and talk with other members!

Close Box

Join Eng-Tips® Today!

Join your peers on the Internet's largest technical engineering professional community.
It's easy to join and it's free.

Here's Why Members Love Eng-Tips Forums:

Register now while it's still free!

Already a member? Close this window and log in.

Join Us             Close