Smart questions
Smart answers
Smart people
INTELLIGENT WORK FORUMS
FOR ENGINEERING PROFESSIONALS

Member Login




Remember Me
Forgot Password?
Join Us!

Come Join Us!

Are you an
Engineering professional?
Join Eng-Tips now!
  • Talk With Other Members
  • Be Notified Of Responses
    To Your Posts
  • Keyword Search
  • One-Click Access To Your
    Favorite Forums
  • Automated Signatures
    On Your Posts
  • Best Of All, It's Free!

Join Eng-Tips
*Eng-Tips's functionality depends on members receiving e-mail. By joining you are opting in to receive e-mail.

Donate Today!

Do you enjoy these
technical forums?
Donate Today! Click Here

Posting Guidelines

Promoting, selling, recruiting, coursework and thesis posting is forbidden.
Jobs from Indeed

Link To This Forum!

Partner Button
Add Stickiness To Your Site By Linking To This Professionally Managed Technical Forum.
Just copy and paste the
code below into your site.

bahram (Electrical) (OP)
25 May 03 11:35
As far as I know, there is no specific guideline in NEMA CC1-2002 for selecting the number of bolt holes for a terminal connectors. It only introduces the typical configurations in Appendix A.

As it is clear, the number of bolt holes is related to the rated current of connector. Is there any specific instruction in this regard?

What is the standards recommendation for a terminal connector with current rating of 1600A and 2500A.

jbartos (Electrical)
26 May 03 3:23
Suggestion: Contact NEMA since it is not currently shown on NEMA web:
http://www.nema.org/help/titles.html
http://www.nema.org/help/docno.html
RajT (Electrical)
26 May 03 8:45
I don't think there are any atandards as such. It is more of a question of engineering judgement. For high current ( say 1000A plus) lugs, one should allow for 4 bolts subject to adequate spacing between hole centres.
jghrist (Electrical)
26 May 03 11:18
NEMA requires connectors to operate cooler than the conductor in a standard heat run test.  For normal operation, you should be able to use whichever connector is listed for the conductor you are using.  If you are designing to run at high conductor temperatures, however, I'd use a larger connector (more bolts).  The more area on the connector the better.

Reply To This Thread

Posting in the Eng-Tips forums is a member-only feature.

Click Here to join Eng-Tips and talk with other members!

Close Box

Join Eng-Tips® Today!

Join your peers on the Internet's largest technical engineering professional community.
It's easy to join and it's free.

Here's Why Members Love Eng-Tips Forums:

Register now while it's still free!

Already a member? Close this window and log in.

Join Us             Close