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SperlingPE (Structural)
17 Apr 03 17:50
Does anybody know of a source for detailing the shear transfer around openings in a wood shear wall?  Something that has some practical use (i.e. it has been done by a contractor on an actual project).
SperlingPE (Structural)
18 Apr 03 11:29
I am aware of the perforated shear wall design method.  This method, however, reduces the capacity of the wall and also reduces labor/materials (less hold downs).  The UBC and IBC give a choice between what details to use.  One is detailing openings to transfer shear loads around the opening the other option is to not detail the load transfer and design as shear wall segments (typical).  I am looking for information on detailing the openings to transfer the shear load.
boo1 (Mechanical)
26 Aug 04 14:25
CTruax (Civil/Environmental)
18 Sep 04 13:04
I have an excel sheet that details one opening
(perforated shear wall with one window/door).
I can email it to you if you still need it
SperlingPE (Structural)
20 Sep 04 7:56
Looking for a detail source.  
RARWOOD (Structural)
17 Nov 04 16:25
Contact the American Plywood Association in Tacoma, Washington they have a lot of good publications on shear walls.

You also might want to pick up a copy of "Design of Wood Structures" by Donald E. Breyer.  I am not sure it covers your topic but it has a lot of information on diaphragms and shear walls.

It also has a large number of examples of ways to detail wood connections to transfer load through a building.  
Helpful Member!  whyun (Structural)
17 Nov 04 20:16
Full depth blocking at the header line of the opening (and sill line if it is a window opening) and provide full length strap entire length of shear wall.

Vertically, you would have a full height post to transfer the force to the holdowns, horizontally, the straps/blocking will provide the shear transfer to the piers.

Depending on the forces, strap may be partial length and remainder of full depth blocking edge nailed.
SperlingPE (Structural)
17 Nov 04 23:00
Thanks to whyun
Any source for an example.
Basically, you give the load a path around the opening.
boo1 (Mechanical)
18 Nov 04 9:46
RARWOOD (Structural)
19 Nov 04 16:55
Another reference you might check is the "Wood Engineering & Construction Handbook" Keith F. Faherty & Thomas Williamson.
whyun (Structural)
22 Nov 04 17:53
SperlingPE,

I'm not sure what codes apply in your area but I'm in California dealing with 1997 UBC based code here.

There is a book called "SEAOC Seismic Design Manual Volume II".  An example of a perforated shear wall can be found in Design Example 1, Section 9 (pages 69-75).  Detailing can be found on Section 11 (page 76).  Not too different from my description on my previous reply.

I believe SEAOC published the next series of these "Seismic Design Manuals" per the IBC 2000.  I do not have copies of these yet as California isn't yet using the IBC.

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