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gyro (Aeronautics) (OP)
29 Mar 03 7:18
Does anyone know what is the best adhesive for glueing bracing bits to polycarbonate canopies and windscreens?
I have been told that silicone causes micro cracks, what else is there that wont let go?
I hope there is an expert out there!
Cheers, Gyro.
swertel (Mechanical)
31 Mar 03 8:44
I just recently did a project dealing with bonding lexan to lexan and used Weld-On 45 from IPS Corp.  It seemed to work really well.  I'll find out for sure after a few years of continued use.

http://www.ipscorp.com/

Our shop guys didn't seem to have any troubles using it.  It is not a liquid like most Lexan adhesives and therefore stayed in place better and filled in gaps.  The rep at IPS that I talked to seemed very knowledgeable about their entire product range and really helped me pick the right adhesive for the job.

--Scott

I do not have any affiliation with this company.  They happened to provide a good product and good service for one of my projects.
twodogs (Electrical)
31 Mar 03 12:09
what does GE say to use? They made the Lexan and should know if anything is suitable for an adhesive...
dan100 (Aeronautics)
5 Apr 03 7:26
I have used Acrifix with good results on Lexan and other plastics.
jmkrri (Mechanical)
21 Jul 03 10:49
I am designing a small plumbing manifold and I would like to use lexan. I am unsure of the best way to bond lexan making it water tight. I have designed manifold like this in the past and used pvc. pvc is to soft for this application and it will get to hot for pvc. Any suggestions. Thanks
rhodie (Industrial)
21 Jul 03 11:05
How about taking some lexan shavings and disolving them in Methyl Ethyl Keytone (MEK) to make a "poor boy's" plastic cement?

(I have used this with other plastics and plexi-glass type materials, but I'm not sure how it would work with Lexan.)
IPHIX (Mechanical)
2 Jul 05 14:03
I used to build things with plexiglas and Lexan and used the Plexiglas solvent.  I just went to find a brand name on the can I have left, but the label has long since dropped off.  It is available in quart cans and you use a sqeeze bottle with a syringe needle on it to apply the solvent.  It effectively welds the plastic together.
I hope this helps. I am new to this board and noticed this thread in passing.
  
berkshire (Aeronautics)
3 Jul 05 22:19
The Solvent of choice for gluing or repairing Polycarbonate (Lexan) is Methylene Cloride, next best Methyl Trichloride  (Chloroform). Methylene Cloride will dissolve lexan without crazing it.
 Be wary of some of the commercial solvents like Plexisolv or Plastruct because some of these contain Glacial acetic acid and I am not sure what that does to Lexan.
 The Methylene Cloride can be made into a soup by dissolving chips of Lexan into it.
 Two part glues like weld-on 45 are good, however. they are amber in color and will not give you an invisible join. I hope this is of help.
Brian Evans.
berkshire (Aeronautics)
4 Jul 05 13:24
One thing I forgot to mention.Because of the high evaporation rate of MC. You will need to use it when the relative humidity is low, or your part will turn white, as the solvent sucks moisture out of the air into the piece you are gluing. Two part systems do not have this problem.
Brian Evans.
btrueblood (Mechanical)
5 Jul 05 17:06
Also please note that both methylene chloride and chloroform are considered hazardous substances, one of which is because of its high carcinogenicity.

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